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Psychology Chap 4

sqeemish fundersnatch

AB
sense organsorgans that receive stimuli
sensory receptor cellscells in sense organs that translate messages into neural impulses that are sent to the brain.
sensationthe process of receiving, translating, and transmitting messages from the outside world to the brain.
perceptionthe process of organizing and interpreting info recieved from the outside world
stimulusany outside influence of our behavior or conscious experience
transductionthe translation of energy from one form to another
absolute thresholdthe smallest magnitude of a stimulus that can be detected half the time
difference thresholdthe smallest difference between two stimuli that can be detected half the time
sensory adaptionweakened magnitude of a sensation resulting from prolonged presentationof the stimulus
psychophysicsa specialty area of psychology that studies sensory limits, sensory adaption, and related topics
Weber's lawthe amount of change in a stimulus needed to detect a difference is in direct proportion to the intensity of the original stimulus
retinathe area at the back of the eye on which images are formed and that contains the rods and cones
rodsthe 125 million cells located outside the center of the retina that transduces light waves into neural impulses, thereby coding info about light and dark
conesthe 6 million receptor cells located mostly in the center of the retina that transduces light waves into neural impulses, thereby coding info about light, dark
foveathe central spot of the retina, which cotains the greatest concentration of cones
optic nervethe nerve that carries neural messages about visions to the brain
blind spotthe spot in the brain where the optic nerve attaches to the retina, which contains no rods or cones
iristhe colored part of the eye behind the cornea that regulates the amount of light that eners
pupilthe opening of the iris
optic chiasmthe area in the brain where the optic nerves cross

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