BeeEnglishIV
Attleboro High School English/Creative Writing Instructor
http://www.attleboroschools.com
WELCOME TO ENGLISH IV and the 2019-2020 School Year
http://www.quia.com/pages/abee/page5

This is one of your final high school English courses and quite possibly
your most important one! This trimester you will study famous writers such as William Shakespeare and James Dashner, along with contemporary authors. You will write essays (Remember the acronym CER = Claim, Evidence, Reasoning), including a college essay (if already completed, we will revise and update), increase your vocabulary (Do you know what "didactic" means?), explore new literature, and make wonderful senior memories.
Did you know the more you read, the better your vocabulary, and the better your vocabulary, the better you do on tests, ?
The trimester will fly once it's begun, so keep up with your work. If there's a problem (personal or professional), let me know early (email or in person), not after the fact please. We will try to work something out. Good luck and keep smiling. This is your LAST year of high school. Make it a great one with wonderful grades and no procrastination, or at least not too much. LOL
The "real" beginning of your life is around the corner! Where will your footsteps lead?


Check this site often (Sunday evening is a great time) to find out new assignments, missed assignments, or other information. Review the suggested links below for different assignments/projects. If you find one of them doesn't work, please let me know. Web pages do change.
You can use REMIND to bounce an idea off of me or if you have a question/comment. Remember, if you send me anything online, be sure to keep a hard copy or a copy in your own files (just in case) and put something in the "message" box so I'll know it's to do with school (I delete all messages when I don't know their origination.) Now is a good time to create a professional e-mail address. Ihateschool@gmail.com is not professional. LOL

We will read The Maze Runner by James Dashner and Macbeth by William Shakespeare first.

    The computers will be used almost daily, but please bring college ruled paper, post-its (various sizes), pen/pencil for class assignments or if the printer stops working (very possible!). A flash drive may be used if preferred to Google.

    First Trimester Only: Summer Reading discussion. We will complete in small groups. Everyone was to read Exit West by Mohsin Hamid from the Recommended Reading List. Go to: https://sites.google.com/attleborops.net/ahssummerreading.
    Select ONE of the four pathways and be sure to have completed all of the requirements listed. Submit projects to your advisor on September 9, 2019. *** Students taking Honors English MUST select the AP/Honors pathway.
    Assignment from Recommended Choice:

    1. Read ONE book from the Recommended Reading List.
    2. Watch ONE movie from the Recommended Viewing List.
    3. Complete ONE project from the Summer Literacy Project List.
    4. Turn into your Advisor on September 9, 2019.





    JOURNALS: You will be required to keep a Journal, which should be saved to a Google file on the computer. Journal responses will be chosen from my Journal website or "This I Believe" essays. It should be computer generated through a Google document. Date every Journal entry.
    Choose two writing journal topics weekly (http://www.quia.com/pages/abee/page3) or through "This I Believe" (http://thisibelieve.org/themes/). Write approximately one-half typed page, single-spaced, for each. Don't forget to copy/paste the journal entry (c/p) or c/p the web address for the Journal entry and date them.

    (Extra credit: if you bring in a writing journal item and I add it to my site...you receive extra credit added to your homework grade.)

    NOTE: Classwork becomes homework if not completed in class.


    Essay Writing There will be two formal class essays (first one is the college essay) and one department essay.
    Remember the two acronyms CER (claim/evidence/reasoning) and SODA (Help evaluate a claim: Specific/Original/Defensible/Arguable). When peer editing to evaluate each other’s claims use SODA.

    Vocabulary: There are vocabulary lists on the website. You will be assigned them periodically. Learning these words is as easy as playing the games! :-)

    The first fifteen to twenty minutes of most classes will be devoted to Journaling and Vocabulary. Check the easel to see which one will be completed each day.


    GRADE DERIVATION: • Summer Reading Project Discussion (included in classwork) • Research project, group assignments, tests 40 % • Written assignments (Journal entries, essays, stories, poetry, etc) 35 % • Homework /Participation/Classwork/Attendance (Preparedness) 25 %
    ********************************************




    "Journal item #1:
    List what you expect to learn in Eng. IV; list what you want to learn in Eng IV, and list what you think you should know when you finish this class to prepare you for college and/or life. Don't forget to date this.
    Journal item #2: your choice from my Writing Journal site or from "This I Believe."
    Journal item #3: Your choice from "This I Believe" by theme http://thisibelieve.org/themes/ or my Writing Journal site:. Additional Journal entries are your choice from either site.
    ** Be sure to date each entry and copy the journal prompt or write down the topic and copy the web address to your journal. When responding to an essay, the first paragraph should explain what the essay was about. The second should be your reaction to the essay.





    IMPORTANT: Trimester 1 and II Homework: Due at the end of the first week - Two topics for your first college essay, the "proverbial" college essay (if already written, choose another topic). Try researching college topics online before you make a choice. Also check with the schools you are interested in attending and see if they have a specific question/s that you must write an essay on. Print out a hard copy of any college's essay topics and bring it/them in or save the website to your "favorites." Consider a topic you are passionate about.
    Check the Common App for their prompts (https://www.commonapp.org/blog/2019-2020-common-app-essay-prompts). Create a Common App account today (https://www.commonapp.org/) for college support.


    _____________________________________________________
    TRIMESTER I



    Wednesday-Thursday, Aug. 28-29, 2019: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will understand what is expected of them in English IV by setting up a Google document for Notes and beginning "important" notes.

    AGENDA:
    Wednesday: Quia, Google documents, classroom procedures, Freedictionary.com, and Remind.
    REMIND Sign-Up: https://www.remind.com/join/engivtri ... Text to 81010 and type in @23bcac
    Answer three of the following questions in groups of 3, then share one thing per person with the class on Thursday.

    1. Explain the funniest thing you have ever seen.
    2. What is the best advice anyone ever gave you?
    3. What is something you wish you had never done?
    4. What is your favorite book or author and why?
    5. How do you know if someone is a true friend?
    6. What does a teacher do that shows s/he likes you?
    7. What is your favorite thing to do on weekends (besides sleep LOL) and why?
    8. What is the best piece of advice you ever gave someone?

    Share answers with a small group first, then with the class.

    Thursday: Quia Roster and vocabulary. Identity vs Identification exercise.

    Homework: Email the teacher with this information: your full name, personal email address, cell phone number, the number of hours you work a week and where, and a parent or guardian’s email and cell phone. Also include your favorite picture that tells something about yourself.

    Thursday Heads Up: We will work on the "Get to Know You" collages on Tuesday.
    Thursday homework: - see above re college essay topics.




    Tues.- Thursday, Sept. 3-5: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will complete their Get To Know You introductions and write their first two Journal entries. The second one can be from "This I Believe" (https://thisibelieve.org/) or the teacher's Journal page (www.quia.com/pages/abee/page3).
    AGENDA: Tuesday: 1. Begin Journaling #1 (see above). 15 minutes
    2. Begin "Get to know You" self-intro collage.
    Word document with a picture of yourself centered in the middle and one where you will be in five years next to it. Add five adjectives across the page in different fonts, colors and angles to describe yourself. Use these tools to intensify your project. Copy, paste and center a favorite saying (be ready to explain it) in a COOL font at the bottom of the page. Paste three pictures of things you really love to do around the page (different sizes please ... can you figure out how to put borders on each one?). Add one final picture of what you will be doing this time next year.
    "Get to Know You" collages to be shared on Wednesday and Thursday.
    3. If time on Thursday, brainstorm with a friend (you should have already been thinking about this), three topics for your "fabulous" college essay based on one or more of the College App prompts. Choose your favorite and list three things that could be part of the essay in order to support the topic. Turn this in at the end of class on Friday.


    Journal #2 from my Webpage ... https://www.quia.com/pages/abee/page3 or from the "This I Believe" essays with your thoughts (Minimum = 1/2 page).
    Website entries: What does the quote mean? How does the quote connect to your own life? What examples can you give that make this quote important to you personally?
    "This I Believe" instructions: How did each "This I Believe" entry affect you emotionally? Did it remind you of anything? What did you think of the tone, the theme? Are you glad you chose that entry? Why? What made it good or was it "great"? Be ready to share if asked.

    Friday Sept. 6: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to brainstorm college essay topics with peers, choose one and then report out.
    AGENDA:
    Discussion on college essays. Read one to the class. Discussion and research re College Board prompts at Common App.
    Small group discussion:
    Answer these questions ... 1. What important event happened in your life that you would want a college to know about you? 2. How does that event tie into one of the Common App questions? 3. What other events happened that also connect to this topic? How can you show your own growth from this topic?
    Talk to your peers about what is important? About how you can show the reader that you would be a good student? About what your own personal goals are? Jot down some notes so you don't forget really good ideas.


    Monday-Tuesday Sept. 9-10: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to take a pre-test, with both multiple choice questions and an essay.
    AGENDA:
    Pre-test (Tuesday: multiple choice questions.)
    (Monday- Pre-test essay)


    Wednesday Sept. 11-Thursday Sept. 12: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to research a college essay topic they want to write about and then write a thesis with both student and teacher feedback.
    AGENDA:
    Research the colleges' application process to see what essay question/s is required.
    Research the Common Application essay choices (7).
    Choose an essay prompt.
    Brainstorm possible ideas to respond to the prompt.
    Write a thesis for the prompt.
    Edit the thesis after student feedback.
    Edit the thesis one more time after teacher feedback.
    Keep for next week and begin writing the second paragraph.
    Write 2 Journals using either my Webpage or "This I Believe."


    Friday, Sept. 13: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to discuss who James Dashner is and find five interesting/fun facts about his Maze Runner series using the internet.
    AGENDA:
    Research Dashner and his Maze Runner series. Share fun facts.
    Copies of The Maze Runner are available online. Timeline for the first 10 chapters will be agreed to.

    CHAPTER ASSIGNMENTS: In pairs, create 2 multiple choice* questions (+ Key) per chapter and a Table with the following information: list of characters + description. One of the MC questions must be a *literary device question, while the other could be a content or vocabulary question. Switch questions each chapter with your partner, so no one always creates one type of question.

    Anything incomplete in class is homework and due on the assigned day. You may work with a partner but be sure you each participate equally.

    The Maze Runner's Web Address: https://www.readanybook.com/online/565300#357054

    HmWK Complete the assignments for each chapter. First assignment due Wednesday, Sept. 18.

    As you read, please think about the final project you will create. We should finish these about Halloween. Here are some ideas:

    *Create at least two songs with music and words for a screenplay of The Maze Runner.
    *Create a model of different scenes in the novel with movable walls.
    *Create a series of pictures for each of five important scenes throughout the novel. Be sure to space them out.
    *Design a maze for Halloween using the novel as a guide. Research mazes online first. Think Halloween!
    *Write a business plan for a "real" maze to be built. Include where it would be located (cost of real estate), the name, admission price, any market-demographics, outside experts that would be needed, location of the maze scenes mapping, background music to be used, and a digital 3-D model of the design. Present this as if you were selling your idea to prospective funders/developers.
    *Create a website for a "maze business." (NOTE: You could work with another group that is creating a maze.) Include advertising, background music, pictures, directions, cost, maybe even a video of a cool scene.
    *Pretend you are the director of the novel and are making it into a movie. What are your challenges? Who would you choose to be your actors/actresses for the main characters? Where is the setting? Set design? Music? Costumes? Equipment and employees needed? Length of time to complete? Make-up artists? Can you become a cost analysis expert? (In fact, what is a cost analysis expert?)
    *If you were in charge of special effects at a REAL maze, what would you use to create a spooky atmosphere? Where would special effects be needed? Fog machines? Chemical reactions? Research how this could be accomplished legally.

    *Do research on the most famous mazes in the world. Include pictures and descriptions of the mazes. Who designed them? How popular are they and at which time of the year? Is there a theme to the mazes? What? What is the best part of each maze?
    *Design a maze for Disney World. What would it look like? Age limits? How large would it be? Which Park would it be a part of?

    I've seen this project completed using the witches in Macbeth as part of a maze, or the use of Minecraft (one person created the maze in Minecraft as the Globe Theater, then burned it down, just as the original Globe burned. Someone else used a multimedia program to create a game. These were amazing projects.
    After reading the novel, one of the above projects or another idea (OK'd by the teacher) will be completed.
    Project Group work (no more than 3-4 people in any group):
    Choose your group wisely . Everyone should play an equal role.
    1. Assign roles with expert titles
    2. Keep a list of any resources or people you use/need
    3. MOST IMPORTANT: Keep an individual Log daily through a shared Google document (each person writes down what they completed on the group Log for that day including how much time it took to complete different items)... what was done and when, what still needs to be done, supplies needed, etc. This should only take about 3-5 minutes each day, but must be completed EVERY day by EVERY individual in your group.



    The Maze Runner Timeline & Instructions

    Web Address: https://readanybook.com/ebook/the-maze-runner-book-1-565451

    CHAPTER ASSIGNMENTS: In pairs,create 2 multiple choice* questions (+ Key) per chapter and a Table with the following information: list of characters + description. One of the MC questions must be a *literary device question, while the other could be a content or vocabulary question. Switch questions each chapter with your partner, so no one always creates one type of question.

    Anything incomplete in class is homework and due on the assigned day. You may work with a partner but be sure you each participate equally.
    Chapters 19-30 you only need one question per chapter and it can be either the multiple choice questions OR the vocabulary/content type of questions.

    Chapters 1-3 due Sept. 18 (assigned on Sept. 13)
    Chapters 4-5 due Sept. 19
    Chapters 6-7 due Sept. 20 (Vocabulary Fun!)
    Sept. 23-24 = College Essay. Chapters 9-10 due Sept. 26
    Chapters 11-13 due Sept. 27 (Vocabulary Fun!)
    Quick quiz!
    Sept. 30-Oct. 1 - College Essay.
    Chapters 14-18 due Oct. 2
    Chapters 19-21 due Oct. 3
    Chapters 22-25 due Oct. 4 (Vocabulary Fun!)
    Oct. 7-8 = College Essay
    Chapters 26-30 due Oct. 9
    Chapters 31-33 should be read by Oct. 10.
    Quick quiz! Chapters 34-35 should be read by Oct. 11. (Vocabulary Fun!)
    Oct. 15 = Finalize college essay.
    Chapters 36-40 should be read by Oct. 16.
    Chapters 41-43 should be read by Oct. 17. Student created quiz including multiple choice, definitions, literary devices, and short answer.
    Chapters 44-47 should be read by Oct. 18. Answer the following questions with your partner:
    1. Why was Thomas disappointed after Teresa showed him the words for the code?
    2. Why were the Grievers attacking the Glade at night?
    3. Why did Thomas want to be stung? How did it happen?
    Chapters 48-51 should be read by Oct. 23.
    Chapters 52-55 should be read by Oct. 24
    Chapters 56-60 should be read by Oct. 25 (Vocabulary Fun!)
    Chapters 61-Epilogue should be read by Oct. 28.
    Projects to be completed by Oct. 31...you may use the entire four days.
    (Note: No characterizations after chapters 33 needed. Just do the multiple choice questions. One can be a content or definition/vocabulary type of question, one must be a literary device question).
    Chapters 50-Epilogue ... Only 1 either literary analysis or definition/phrase question per chapter. Please finish reading.


    TRY TO RECOGNIZE THE FOLLOWING IN YOUR READINGS AND USE THESE LITERARY DEVICES
    IN YOUR MULTIPLE CHOICE QUESTIONS:
    SIMILE: a literary device that makes a comparison using "like" or "as," showing similarities between two different things. It is a direct comparison.
      Example: "He is as cunning as a fox." or "The building listed like the Leaning Tower of Pisa in Italy."

    METAPHOR: a literary device which makes an implicit, implied or hidden comparison between two things that are unrelated but share some common characteristics.
      Example: "He is the black sheep in the family." or "My brother was boiling mad."

    HYPERBOLE: a literary device where the author uses words & phrases that exaggerate and overemphasize to create a larger-than-life effect. It usually conveys an action or sentiment that is generally not realistic.
      Example: “I am so tired I cannot walk another inch” or “I’m so sleepy I might fall asleep standing here.”

    PERSONIFICATION: a literary device in which a thing, an idea or an animal is given human attributes. The non-human objects are portrayed as actually having the ability to act like human beings.
      Example: "The fire swallowed the entire forest." or "The chair screeched adding to the spookiness of the old house."


    ALLITERATION: a literary device that repeats similar sounds, usually consonants or consonant clusters.
      Example: "Five miles meandering with a mazy motion." - Taylor Coleridge's "Kubla Khan"

    ALLUSION: a literary device that references a person, place, event, or another literary work, expecting the reader to recognize and respond to it.
      Example: “Don’t act like a Romeo in front of her.” – “Romeo” is a reference to Shakespeare’s Romeo, a passionate lover of Juliet, in “Romeo and Juliet.”

    SARCASM: a form of verbal irony that mocks, ridicules, or expresses contempt. It's really more a tone of voice than a literary device, but is important in writing. Sarcasm can be used to hurt or offend or can be used for comic affect.
      Example: “This is an excellent time for you to become a missing person."


    FLASHBACK: a literary device where the author depicts the occurrence of specific events to the reader, which have taken place before the present time.
      Example: When Thomas awakens after the Changing, he tells his recovered memories to the Keepers. “‘When I went through the Changing, I saw flashes of images… But I remember enough’” (Dashner 302). As Thomas speaks, the story flashes back to his recovered memories. This creates interest and builds tension towards the climax.


    IRONY: a literary device where words are used in such a way that their intended meaning is different from the actual meaning of the words. It may also be a situation that ends up in quite a different way than what is generally anticipated.
      Example: For instance, in The Maze Runner, when Alby and Minho try to examine a dead Griever, they hope to bring it back to the Glade without any difficulties. Instead, the Griever is actually alive and injures Alby. This makes the journey back to camp a hard one. This is the opposite outcome of what Minho and Alby expected. This demonstrates situational irony.

    ONOMATOPOEIA:A literary device that uses words (such as hiss or murmur) to imitate the sounds associated with the objects or actions they refer to. Interestingly enough, onomatopoeia is sometimes called a figure of sound rather than a figure of speech
      Example: Since my last name is so easy to say; it goes without saying that it is an easy way to show onomatopoeia. BZZZZZZZZZ. LOL





    STOP...Arrete...หยุด...Detener...Pare...やめる...STOP...Acha...Prohibere...បញ្ឈប់។...
    Monday Sept. 16-Friday Sept. 20: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will begin writing their college essay after completing a conversation with the teacher.
    Students will begin reading the The Maze Runner and discuss it in pairs while beginning a character list.


    AGENDA:

    Monday-Tuesday ... College essay conversation with teacher and introduction.
    Wednesday-Friday ... Begin reading the novel orally.
    Continue reading the novel


    Monday Sept. 23-Friday, Sept. 27: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will continue to work on their college essays.
    Students will read and create questions for The Maze Runner in pairs and answer the following questions while creating a detailed character list.

    AGENDA:
    Monday-Tuesday: College essays. Mini-lesson on college essay writing each day (thesis, introductory paragraph, content paragraphs, synopsis). Independent work!
    Wednesday-Friday: Teacher-led reading.
    Answer the following questions with your partner about The Maze Runner.
    Independent work or in pairs.
    Put all TMR stuff in a Google doc. You will eventually share this with me. Make sure both yours and your partner's name is at the top of it.
    1. Describe the Changing.
    2. What are the following: BloodHouse, Med-Jacks, the Homestead, Gardens, and Deadheads? 3. List all of the characters and include a character description (emotionally/physically) for each.
    See reading assignment above.


    ______________________________________________________________________________
    Monday Oct. 1: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to discuss up through chapter 16 of the Maze Runner and in pairs create and update their character list.
    AGENDA:
    Vocabulary for The Maze Runner. Read chapter 19 orally. Independent work after discussion of novel and characters.

    Tuesday Oct. 2-October 3, 2018: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to discuss up through chapter 18 of The Maze Runner and in pairs create and update their character list.
    AGENDA:
    Vocabulary for The Maze Runner. Read chapter 19 orally on Monday. Independent work after discussion of novel and characters.


    Tuesday Oct. 4-October 5, 2018: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will work independently on The Maze Runner creating MC questions and updating their character list.
    AGENDA:
    Vocabulary for The Maze Runner, CHALLENGE TIME! Read chapter orally on. Independent work after discussion of novel and characters.


    Tuesday Oct. 9, 2018: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will work independently on The Maze Runner creating MC questions and updating their character list.
    AGENDA:
    Independent work. Check through a shared document on Thursday for chapters 1-33. Two MC questions per chapter, one of which is a literary question. This assignment can be done with a partner or individually (easier with a partner).

    October 10, 2018: PSAT Day. The Maze Runner MC questions and updated character list due Thursday at the end of class. This will be shared through a Google document. Be sure to put your name on it. Bold the correct answers to the MC questions please.
    AGENDA:
    PSAT Activities


    Thursday Oct. 11, 2018: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will work independently on The Maze Runner creating MC questions and updating their character list to be shared at the end of class including chapters 1-33.
    AGENDA:
    Oral reading of chapter 33. Independent work. Share at the end of class please.

    Friday, Oct. 12, 2018: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will work independently on The Maze Runner vocabulary, playing against each other, then work on their Journal.
    AGENDA:
    Vocabulary practice, Play Off using Quizlet (sign up through this link. Use your REAL name please, capitalize both first and last names please. https://quizlet.com/join/GXr6WZ9PF), Journal.


    Monday, Oct. 15-Friday, 19, 2018: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will work independently on The Maze Runner according to the timeline.
    AGENDA:
    Journaling, The Maze Runner.
    Friday - Quizletlive


    Monday, Oct. 22 -Oct. 26, 2018: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will work independently on The Maze Runner according to the timeline.
    AGENDA:
    Journaling, The Maze Runner.
    Friday - Quizletlive


    Monday, Oct. 29 -Nov. 2, 2018: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will work independently on The Maze Runner according to the timeline.
    AGENDA:
    Journals due Oct. 31 (8 + 2 for extra credit + points if early), The Maze Runner.
    TMR MC questions due Nov. 2. Projects next week! Friday - Quizletlive



    Monday, Nov. 5 -Nov. 9, 2018: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will work independently or in pairs on The Maze Runner projects.
    AGENDA:
    Last Journals due Nov. 21 (4 + 1 for extra credit + points if early), The Maze Runner Project. Projects due Nov. 13
    Friday - Quizletlive
    TMR Final will be a take-home final on Quia. It will be active from 8:30 a.m. on Tuesday until 8 a.m. on Thursday. You may use any resource EXCEPT each other. Good luck!


    Tuesday, Nov. 13 -Nov. 16, 2018: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will present their The Maze Runner projects to their peers.
    AGENDA:
    Last Journals due Nov. 21 (4 + 1 for extra credit + points if early), The Maze Runner Project presentations.
    Friday - Quizletlive






























































































































































































































































































    Stop***Arret***Stop***Stoppen***Stop***Stop***
    DO NOT READ BEYOND THIS UNLESS IN TRIMESTER II :-) :-) :-) ***
    Stop***Stop***Parar***Stop***Alto***Stop***
    TRIMESTER II

    Monday, Dec. 3, 2018

    Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be be introduced to the classroom routines, Quia, Vocabulary, Remind.
    AGENDA: Eng. IV Introduction



    ****************************STOP***************************
    Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2018
    Mastery Objective (MO) Students will work in small groups to answer the following questions and then share their answers.
    AGENDA:Small group work


    Answer three of the following questions in a group of 3 then share one thing per person with the class.
    REMIND Sign-Up: https://www.remind.com/join/engivtri
    1. Explain the funniest thing you have ever seen.
    2. What is the best advice anyone ever gave you?
    3. What is something you wish you had never done?
    4. What is your favorite book or author and why?
    5. How do you know if someone is a true friend?
    6. What does a teacher do that shows s/he likes you?
    7. What is your favorite thing to do on weekends (besides sleep LOL) and why?
    8. What is the best piece of advice you ever gave someone?

    Wednesday, Dec. 5 - Friday Dec. 7, 2018
    Mastery Objective (MO) Students will create a "Get to Know You" Collage, then share with the class.
    AGENDA:Work on Collages, share on Thursday and Friday.

    Word document with a picture of yourself centered in the middle and one where you will be in five years next to it. Add five adjectives across the page in different fonts, colors and angles to describe yourself. Copy and paste a favorite saying (be ready to explain it). Paste three pictures of things you really love to do around the page. Add one final picture of what you will be doing this time next year at the top right.
    Homework: Email the teacher with this information: your full name, personal email address, cell phone number, the number of hours you work a week and where, and a parent or guardian’s email and cell phone. Also include your favorite picture that tells something about yourself.

    Friday homework see above re college essay topics.



    Wednesday, Dec. 10 - Friday Dec. 14, 2018
    Mastery Objective (MO) Students will work on their college essay rough drafts.
    AGENDA: Brainstorm topics, create first paragraphs, proof
    Quizlet on Friday for Literary Terms.

    Wednesday, Dec. 17 - Friday Dec. 21, 2018
    Mastery Objective (MO) Students will complete their college essay rough drafts.
    AGENDA:College essay rough draft + Journals.
    Journals are due by Dec. 21. You need 6. You may do 1 extra one (+20), plus turn them in early for extra credit (+10).
    Quizlet on Friday for Literary Terms.

    HAPPY HOLIDAYS



    Wednesday, Jan. 2 - Friday Jan. 4, 2019
    Mastery Objective (MO) Students will work on their college essay finals.
    AGENDA: Independent work on essays with teacher reviews.
    Journals if done.
    Quizlet on Friday for Literary Terms.



    Monday, Jan. 7 - Friday Jan. 11, 2019
    Mastery Objective (MO) Students will complete their college essay final and begin Address Unknown
    AGENDA: Monday: Complete essays
    Tuesday: Peer edit printed college essays focusing on kicking up grammar, punctuation, a catchy title, and capitalization. Then give the essay back to its owner for correcting. Final essays should be shared with me through APS account.
    If someone is done, they may work on their Journal.
    Wednesday: Students should go to http://lindaksienkiewicz.com/wwii-letters-between-two-brothers/ and read the website. In a short paragraph, describe what it was like to find those letters and explain how you'd feel if it was your grandparents.
    Then students should go to http://www.acobas.net/teaching/textbook/address/addressunknown.pdf and begin reading the first three letters in the novella Address Unknown. Students should take quick notes as to what each letter is about. Include the characters.
    Any extra time? Work on Journals.

    Thursday: Continuation of Address Unknown. Read letters 4-7 independently (through page 6). With a partner, create a character list and describe each character both physically and emotionally.
    Friday: Study Literary Terms terminology on Quizlet .
    Continuation of Address Unknown. Read 8-11 (through page 8). Continue taking notes and expand the character analysis.
    HmWk: Read the rest of the novella for homework. Discussion on Monday. Complete your character analyses.


    Monday-Jan. 14: M.O. Students will be able to use a Mood Color Wheel to create two totally different written descriptions of entering their home, one that is calm and one that creates a totally different mood, such as fear, anxiety, or excitement.

    Agenda:
    Warm-up: 1. Look up the "Color Wheel" of moods: https://www.tangentialliving.com/accelerate/2017/9/2/re-inventing-the-wheel. Make a list on a Google doc of all the words you would use to describe yourself.

    2. Underneath this list, type a paragraph describing you entering your home after school. Make me see your entrance. Use colors, sounds, textures, and things.
    3. Now, rewrite the exact same scene, changing the vocabulary so that the description goes from a calm mood to a scary, fearful, or anxious one. Use your mood color wheel for vocabulary suggestions.
    Print the document and read your two descriptions to a partner.
    Your partner should then underline the words that changed the mood from calm to scary/fearful/anxious and sign off on your paper.
    Make sure your name is on both your paper and your partner's and drop it in the InBox with your partner's.

    HmWk: Be sure you have finished reading Address Unknown by Tuesday.

    Tuesday-Jan. 15: M.O. Students will be able to write a description of each of the characters in the novella using the Color Wheel of Moods to enhance their thought process.
    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    1. Get out your main character list and description that you've been keeping. 2. Make a list for each main character and the way their moods changed throughout the novella. As each character experiences the effects of the war, what changes do you witness? Be sure to include when you saw the moods change.
    Address Unknown by Katherine Kressman Taylor can be found at http://www.acobas.net/teaching/textbook/address/addressunknown.pdf
    Once your list is complete, share with two other people and add anything you missed to your own list. Print and turn this into the Inbox.
    3. With a partner, read the following statement, then explain it. Type your explanation, put both your names at the top and turn it in.
    "First published as a short story in 1938, this epistolary novel quickly became a publishing sensation and was hailed by the New York Times as "The most effective indictment of Nazism to appear in fiction."
    If any of the words in the quote are unknown, look them up. Check out the internet for more explanations if you don't know the answer.

    HmWk: Play the vocabulary quiz game for 1B. Test on Friday. Finish your college essays.

    Wednesday-Jan. 16, 2019: M.O. Students will be able to work with a partner to answer the following questions about the novella Address Unknown.
    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    1. Read the following: "The novella is related entirely through the correspondence of two men, Martin Schulse (gentile) and Max Eisenstein (Jew). Though German by birth, both men have been living in the USA during the interwar period.
    "The novella, which opened in 1932 when Martin returns to Germany begins this correspondence. The initial letters convey warmth and affection between the two men; they have a shared past, shared cultural reference points, and it is implied that Max's sister, Griselle, has been Martin's lover.

    Main characters: Martin, Max, Elsa, Griselle, and Heinrich.

    In groups of no more than two (2) to three (3) answer the following questions using supporting details/page citations for 1-10 (No credit without supporting documentation!). Use websites for any needed help in answering A-F.

    A. What does "epistolary" mean?
    B. What is the "Third Reich"?
    C. What year did WW II begin in Europe?
    D. What began WW II?
    E. Why did Hitler want a world war?
    F. In what year did the US enter WW II?

    1. How does Taylor uses the voice of Martin to convey his private thoughts to Max on the rise of Hitler?
    2. How does Martin’s perspective on Hitler changes and how this is reflected in the voice employed in his letters as the novella progresses?
    3. How does Taylor use language to convey how Max’s trust in Martin changes as the novella progresses?
    4. How does Taylor manipulate the voice of Martin to communicate details of his affair with Griselle to the reader?
    5. How does Taylor use the voice of Martin to convey his changing attitude toward the situation in Germany?
    6. How is Martin's perspective influenced by Nazi propaganda as the novella progresses?
    7. How does Taylor use the voice of Martin to convey his attitude toward the Jews through his response to the killing of Griselle?
    8. How does this impact a) Max's s relationship with Martin and b) the broader situation in Germany as the novella progresses?
    9a. How does Taylor manipulate the voice and the language of Max to incriminate Martin?
    9b. How does the use of the phrase "our grandmother" affect Martin? Is that important? Why or why not?
    10. Why does he do this?
    If not finished, complete the questions through Google docs or email or on the phone with your partners and turn it for homework on Thursday.
    HmWk: Finish anything incomplete for homework. Due Thursday.


    Thursday-Jan. 17- Friday, Jan. 18, 2019: M.O. Students will research possible projects for their own set of current letters and begin writing them with a partner.

    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    Discussion of possible sets of letters that would have a definitive meaning today (immigration/transgender/legalization of marijuana/the border Wall/cost of college/internet/net neutrality/marriage equality/child abuse/poverty/racial inequity/social-emotional learning/vaping/depression/human trafficking/genetic cloning/capital punishment/GoFundMe/draft/international American protection/etc.

    Choose a partner. Research information about the topic chosen. Begin brainstorming how you and your partner will write the letters. While waiting for your partner to finish a letter, work on Journals or the Address Unknown vocabulary below.
    Quizlet.com re Address Unknown vocabulary on Tuesday.


    Tuesday-Jan. 22, 2019 M.O. Students will work independently with their partner researching their given topic and giving a character description to at leas two characters (the writers of the letters).
    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    Character description. Ex: Max Eisenstein ... Jewish, successful art gallery co-owner, friendly, revengeful, middle aged, has younger sister, no parents, tall, white, of German descent, degree in European art from University of California, etc.
    Work with your partner researching your topic. You should have lots of facts that could be inserted into your letters. Write down yours and your partner's name and the chosen topic and turn it in to the teacher with your character analysis.

    Wednesday-Thursday -Jan. 23-24, 2019 M.O. Students will work independently with their partner finalizing their research and beginning to write their letters using the character analysis they created.
    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    Literary Device paired assignment (15 minutes)
    Discuss with another paired group what you are doing and give feedback/offer thoughts/ comments to help them focus their work. 10 minutes. Create character descriptions for at least two characters (the letter writers).
    Journals or work independently to answer the questions from the peer group within your letters and write the character descriptions.
    Be sure to complete the first set of letters by Monday.

    Friday -Jan. 25 M.O. Students will take a multiple choice test on Address Unknown.
    Agenda:
    Test. Warm-up:
    Write first set of letters being sure to incorporate the character descriptions.
    HmWk: Continue writing the letters. Paired letters #2 and #3 should be done by Tuesday.


    Monday-Thursday -Jan. 28-31, 2019 M.O. Students will work independently to finish the letters by Friday.
    Agenda:
    Independent work Letter pairs # 4-7 (at least) should be completed this week. Shoot for 1 set a day if not more depending on how long each one is.
    Journals are due. (8). Each student may do up to two extra for extra credit points.


    Friday - Feb. 1 M.O. Students will present to the teacher their completed work for input.
    Agenda:
    Independent presentations with teacher.
    Journaling if not presenting.


    Monday-Monday-Feb 4-11 M.O. Students will edit, practice and present their "Letter" projects to the class or to another class, using an introduction, then reading them orally, then giving an activity dealing with the topic.
    Agenda:
    Independent work Letters will be given back as soon as graded. Fix them, contact another teacher to present them, create the "book."
    Play catch-up with assignments and Journal for February.
    We begin Macbeth on Tuesday. Be ready!


    Tuesday-Friday-Feb 12-15 Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to read orally Act I, scenes i-iii in class.
    AGENDA:


    Tuesday: Character Handout. Review of characters, especially Macbeth, Lady Macbeth, Banquo, Macduff, and Lady Macduff.
    Read the first three scenes in Act I of Macbeth.
    Students will work independently and list two (2) important quotes (who said, who said to and why important), write a short summary of Act I, scenes i-iii, and continue their character descriptions for those characters introduced in the first three scenes of Act I of Macbeth in order to help them understand the plot and characters in the play.

    Students may use their phone to access the translated novel at https://www.enotes.com/topics/macbeth/etext/act-i.
    1. Using the textbook or enotes website, individually find two important quotes from the first three scenes and write them down, including who said them, who the quote was said to and why it was important.
    2. Briefly summarize each of the first three scenes.
    3. Continue character analysis for the following characters: 3 witches, King Duncan, Malcolm, Macbeth, Banquo, and Ross/Lennox.
    4. Read scenes iv and v (pages 187-191); finish for homework.
    Quiz in class on Tuesday on the two scenes. (REMEMBER: you can use the translated version online at https://www.enotes.com/topics/macbeth/etext/act-i.)
    HmWk: Finish whatever was not completed during class for homework. Be prepared for a "pop" quiz.
    HmWk: Finish reading any unfinished scene for homework. List the three prophecies the witches told Macbeth and Banquo and draw a picture of the witches. (check internet for ideas)

    Wednesday:
    Students will orally read Act I, scenes vi-vii, continue their character descriptions for those characters introduced, and complete questions 1-5 on page 195 for Act I of Macbeth.
    1. (https://www.enotes.com/topics/macbeth/etext/act-i)
    2. Add to character list.
    3. Complete the Reading Check on page 195, questions 1-5.
    (Take a picture of it, so you don't have to take the book home.)

    Thursday:
    1. Mini-Lesson: iambic pentameter with "jumping."
    2. Students will read the Commentary on pages 195-196 for Act I of Macbeth and discuss in groups.
    3. Organize groups of 4, explain how to read (each person reads a part and then explains it to the rest of the group).
    4.Create a brief summary of Act I and turn it in with group members' names.
    5. Read the Literary Elements on page 196. Define "blank verse" and "iambic pentameter" and how they are related to Macbeth.
    6. If time: 10 minutes of vocabulary at Quia Java Game: Shakespeare's Vocabulary re Macbeth (see way below).

    Friday, Feb. 15:
    1. Students will go over Act I (Go over homework (Ques. 1-5 at the end of Act I) and take a short multiple choice quiz on it.
    2. Students will play Quizlet in teams re the Shakespeare vocabulary.
    Time left? Students may use it to play catch up.


    HAPPY FEBRUARY VACATION!!!


    Monday-Friday-Feb 25-March 1M.O. Students will read Acts II and III of Macbeth orally in class..
    Monday:
    1.Students will read/act out Act II, scenes i-iii during class then write a short summary, and add to their character descriptions in Macbeth. Through line 50 (?) in class (Parts assigned).

    2. Watch the Porter scene (Act II, scene i) at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8csyAIUkdtY, then discuss in class. HmWk: Add details to character descriptions, including the Porter and Macduff.
    Tuesday:
    1. Students will complete reading orally Act II, scenes iii and iv, then play the vocabulary from Macbeth activity.

    2. Practice the vocabulary. Play against each other for the class winner!
    HmWk: With a partner answer the 10 questions on page 208. Keep practicing the vocabulary.

    Wednesday:
    1.Students will in small groups complete literary circles on Act II.
    Literary Circles:
    a. Character Describer Aficionado (checks everyone's work to make sure their character lists are up-to-date and accurate. Adds information through dialogue if needed.)
    b. Summarizer Extraordinaire (Write a brief summary of assigned section. Share with group.)
    c. Inspired Quoter (find at least 1-3 quotes per scene that are really important [golden nugget style!] and share with group who said it, who it was said to, and why it is imporant)
    d. Vocabulary Pundit (find at least 3-5 words per scene that you are unfamiliar with. Check with the group to see if they know the words. Define them and share with the group).
    2. Turn in homework: Reading Check on page 208 1-10 in class.
    HmWk: find a picture of the Globe Theater from 1599 and another one from today. Print them out side by side and turn in on Monday.


    Wednesday:
    1. Students will review their answers to the questions on page 208 under "Reading Check" and begin Act III scenes i -iii.
    2. Share Globe pictures with the class in small groups.
    3. Finish any assignment incomplete. Answer any questions 1-10 (all parts) under "Reading Check" on page 208 about Act II.
    4. Complete at least 15 minutes of Macbeth Vocabulary or work on Journal.
    5. Read Act III, scene i-iii.
    HmWk: Complete questions 1-5 on page 223.

    Thursday
    Students will complete at least three entries in their Journal if behind and then have discussions with the teacher about their group project grades.
    Agenda: Journal entries, group project discussions, vocabulary if time.

    Friday
    1.Students will able to show their understanding of Act III by watching https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1SPfUwavfbY (Act III i), and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DcRBKvHECvw (Act III iv), then individually summarizing scenes i-vi briefly through bullets.
    2. Watch the videos then in pairs briefly summarize scenes i-iv through bullets. Include what happens and who is in each scene.

    3. Read scenes iv-vi, then write a brief summary of those scenes.
    4. Answer questions 6-10 on page 223. (REMEMBER you can use the website https://www.enotes.com/topics/macbeth/etext/act-i for help in translating the dialogue.)
    Share it!


































    STOP





    Tuesday, Feb. 14: Students will discuss Act III in its entirety, turn in answers for questions 6-10 on page 223 and summary of Act III, read Act IV i orally, and then show their understanding by rewriting the witches scene from line 48-134.
    Agenda:
    Happy Valentine's Day! Class discussion.
    1. Turn in questions 6-10 on page 223 and summary for Act II by scenes.
    2. Act IV i read orally.
    Watch the scene at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v6Ebfe90aeQ.
    What do you think Macbeth is really thinking during his time with the witches? 4. Independent assignment: Act IV i lines 48-134 to be rewritten into today's English. (This should be different from the translation version. Bee creative!) Due Wednesday.
    HmWk: Journals were due last Friday. There were to be six (6) dated, preferably typed, entries. I will take today, but no extra credit points.

    Wednesday, Feb. 15: Students will show their understanding of Act IV i by sharing their rewrites of the scene in small groups.
    Agenda:
    1. Small group work re witch's scene.
    2. Read Act IV, scene ii independently. Find a scene at youtube.com that expertly and interestingly shows this murder scene. Summarize in bullets what is happening. Due at end of class.

    HmWk: Finish whatever not completed in class for homework.

    Thursday-Friday , Feb. 16-17: Students will understand why Macduff cries vengeance on Macbeth after reading the translation of Act IV scene iii in class quietly, drawing a picture of the murder scene, and answering questions 1-5 on page 238.
    You have two (2) days to complete the assignments below and send them to me, except for the picture.
    Agenda:
    1. Watch the murder scene (ii) at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HMbB2PHBXmg.
    2. Draw a picture of the murder scene including all those in attendance. Label the people if not obvious. Put in the InBox.
    3. Answer these two questions in pairs and send them to me through email:
    a) If you were Macduff, would you have left your family?
    b) What would YOU have done once you found out your wife and babes had been murdered by Macbeth's "hand"?
    4. Read Act IV scene iii orally in your group (if in cafeteria - please read silently) or with the larger part of the class.
    5. Answer the following questions in pairs and send to me through email.
    a) Describe Macduff's feelings as he is told by Ross of his family's murder.
    b) Describe Ross's feelings as he tells Macduff the horrific news. Send your answers to me with names on the document.
    6. Answer questions 1-5 on page 238 (printed below for your convenience).
    a. What is Macbeth told by the Apparitions?
    b. What does Macbeth learn about Banquo's "issue"?
    c. What crime is Macduff accused of by Macbeth?
    d. Why does Malcolm at first suspect Macduff of treachery?
    e. Why does Macduff blame himself for the death of his wife and children?
    Thursday HmWk: Define pathos (page 1128 or online) and explain Ross's feelings toward Macduff. Make the connection to pathos please. Send this to me through email.
    VACATION HmWk: Check out March 2 below for final projects. Decide over vacation which project you want to do and set up a plan for completing it.


    Happy February Vacation!


    Monday, Feb. 27: Students will act out Act V, scenes, i, iii, iv, v,vii, and viii, answering questions as the play proceeds relating to important quotes and references.
    Agenda:
    Review the play to this point.
    Orally read Act V, with teacher explanations for scenes ii and vi.
    Students should understand the three witches' prophecies, the three apparitions' prophecies, know what happened to Lady Macbeth, Macbeth and Macduff, and who is the new king and where he will be crowned.
    Know "candle" metaphor for life
    Why Lady Macbeth fears the dark
    What shows the reader that this is a warlike act?
    When does Macbeth not feel invincible?
    Who kills Macbeth? How?

    Quotes: Who said, who said to and significance: "Out damned spot!..." Act Vi 25-28
    "I have almost forgot the taste of fears." Act V v 9.
    "Out, out, brief candle!...Signifying nothing." Act V v 23-28
    "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow...time" Act V v 19-21
    HmWk: 1. Do the "Reading Check" on page 249, questions 1-10.

    Tuesday Feb. 28: Students will turn in the "Reading Check" on page 249, then choose one of the major characters and analyze their personalities citing the reactions of others, the person's actions or conversations, and soliloquies.

    Agenda: 1. Turn in the questions and email the answers to me or use a Google document and share with me.
    2. See page 250, #2 under "The Play as a Whole." Analyze one of the following characters using particular lines in the play to support your response. Macbeth, Lady Macbeth, Banquo, or Macduff.
    When analyzing a character, be sure to include physical and emotional information that makes the character whole. Is the character a protagonist (hero/tragic hero) or antagonist (villain), is s/he dynamic (changing) or static (unchanging), what are their relationships with others, and/or what lessons did your character learn?
    Be sure to cit act, scene and line. For example "II iii line 16" is Act 2, scene 3, line 78. You may use a graph or organizer to complete this assignment if it is easier (See handouts).

    Ex Cr: Write down a one-two line summary for each scene with a partner, then create a tableau vivante for one of the following scenes.
    Tableau vivante: for scenes i (group of 3), iii (group of 4), v (group of 3) or viii (group of 5) .


    Wednesday, March 1: Students will discuss the ending of the play and the play in its entirety focusing on important quotations and imagery that reflect the mood/tone of the play.
    Agenda:
    Discussion of ending of Act V and answer any remaining questions. Review for final.
    Famous Quotes: who said, who was it said to, and what does it mean?
    Imagery: examples referring to darkness, blood, nature, and the supernatural
    HmWk: Watch the cartoon version of Macbeth at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qfnUq2_0FOY

    Thursday, March 2: Students will take an online final on Macbeth and choose their final project.
    Agenda:
    FINAL

    Topic Choices
    1. Create a rap that Macbeth could recite when he is fighting Macduff.
    This should be at least three minutes long. (individual)

    2. Research and draw/create a prototype of the original Globe Theater. (1-2 students)

    3. Create a day-by-day detailed Diary for Lady Macbeth.
    Include the day her husband arrives with the news, the day Macbeth kills King Duncan,
    the day Banquo arrives as a ghost to their celebration dinner, the day Macduff's family is killed,
    and her final three days of life. This should be more than a document.
    "Bee" creative! (1-2 students)

    4. Research four famous paintings depicting characters in Macbeth
    (these must be of different characters, so all can't be of the withes for example),
    describe the paintings in detail, the artist (find out a little bit abut the artist also),
    where each painting is housed, what characters the paintings depict and
    who the actor/actress/es is/are if applicable.
    Explain the painting's significance to the play (act/scene).
    Find out how much each painting is worth and why each one is valuable. (pair)

    5. Create a realistic stage for the final battle scene in Macbeth including props. (individual)

    6. Research at least four famous people (total of 8) for two of the following:
    Macbeth, Lady Macbeth, Banquo, and/or Macduff,
    over the last 100 years who have played Macbeth and Lady Macbeth on stage and
    include their picture as a regular person, a picture of each in costume, and
    each actor/actresses' acting resume. (pair)

    7. Read the play Signifying Nothing's review.
    Explain how you think this modern day version of Macbeth would play to an audience today.
    Go to http://www.ita.org.au/2016/11/signifying-nothing-reviewed-by-gordon-the-optom/ for the review.
    Design the stage for this modern version of Macbeth.
    Assign modern day actors/actresses to the roles listed in the review and explain why you chose each.

    8. Check out the website http://www.pathguy.com/macbeth.htm
    and after reading at least three of the amazing sections, share the information with the class
    through a Powerpoint or detailed research paper.
    Include who the author of this site is and what his credentials are. Include linked pictures.
    Check out the links in each section and add this information to your presentation. (Individual)

    9. Write at least a three page typed double spaced essay, with cited evidence, answering one of the following prompts: (individual)
    A. "How does Macbeth's character change throughout the course of the play?"
    B. "Explain how Macbeth, the character, is a tragic hero."
    C. "What are the dangers of excessive ambition? Connect this to the real world."
    D. "What is lost or gained in the quest for success? Connect this to the real world."

    10. Student Choice: If you have had enough of William Shakespeare, individually read one of the following short stories/myth:
    Amy Tan's "Rules of the Game"
    (https://jg019.k12.sd.us/eng1/Assignment%20Documents/Rules%20of%20the%20Game.pdf)
    or
    "Icarus and Daedalus" from Mythology
    (http://www.ontarioteacher.org/reading7/index_htm_files/Icarus%20and%20Daedalus%20Myth.pdf)
    and present it to the class in a creative fashion.
    Include characters, plot, setting, tone, and emphasize theme.
    If you chose the myth, include your responses to the following questions as well:
    A. Is Daedalus responsible for his son’s death?
    B. How is flight still fascinating to today's youth?
    C. Create a map of Sicily and the Icarian Sea.
    D. Why did Daedalus hang up his wings both emotionally and physically (beyond the fact that his son had died)? What were his emotions?
    Check out the following websites also to add information to your rpesentation: https://www.greekmyths-greekmythology.com/myth-of-daedalus-and-icarus/ and https://www.greekmyths-greekmythology.com/daedalus-inventor-ancient-greece/.
    HmWk: Work on project. Due Friday, Mar. 9-10.


    Friday, March 3: Students will complete independent work on their final Macbeth projects.
    Agenda:
    Review of Act II and III quotes.
    Student Independent Work: Macbeth final project.


    Monday, March 6: Students will independently on their Macbeth projects.
    Agenda:
    Independent work on projects.

    Tuesday, March 7: Students will review for final on Macbeth.
    Agenda:
    Review quotes for Acts IV and V + vocabulary.
    Independent work on Final Project -due Thursday/Friday.

    Wednesday, March 8: Students will take a final on the play Macbeth.
    Agenda:
    Final online. If time ... students will work on their final project.

    Thursday, March 9: Students will work independently on their final projects or present if finished.
    Agenda:
    Independent work/Early finished project presentations.

    Friday, March 10: Students will present their final projects.
    Agenda:
    Presentations















































































































































    Don't read below this line ... _____________________


































    Previous assignments ...
    Wednesday-Thursday, Dec.. 14-15

    Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to read the assigned chapters of the novel, The Maze Runner and complete the assignment.
    AGENDA:Students automatically go to work either reading the novel or completing the work required for each chapter.
    Students should complete 2 multiple choice questions per chapter, define the bolded words/phrases, continue adding to their character description list, and add to their list of "new" words.

    Friday, Dec.. 16

    Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to discuss the characters with a partner and create a picture for each based on their characteristics.
    AGENDA:Quiz
    Recap of characters and new words. Answer any questions.
    Partner work. Character assignment: List all of the characteristics for your assigned characters (at least 2) and then draw a picture of your characters labeling the characteristics. Turn it in.


    Monday, Dec.. 19
    Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to take a quiz on chapters 6-10 of the novel with at least 60% accuracy.
    AGENDA:Quiz
    Give out the next set of chapters. Remind students of the assignment for each chapter. Time in class to work independently.

    Tuesday, Dec.. 20
    Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to discuss chapters 14-15 with their peers and finish the questions, definitions, and characterizations for those chapters.
    AGENDA: Turn and Talk: Group characterization of the "new girl" (add characterization to your own notes) and Journal (4 entries due Thursday).
    Independent work on assignment. Due at the end of class.
    Reminder: Journal website: https://www.quia.com/pages/abee/page3 or Google "This I Believe" essays, if you do it at home. Journal entires should be your half page (approximately) reaction to the prompt or verbal essay.
    **SPECIAL: Two multiple choice questions can be made into one if one of the four literary devices above is used for the question.**

    Wednesday, Dec.. 21
    Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to discuss chapter 16 with their peers and finish the questions, definitions, and characterizations for that chapter.
    AGENDA:Vocabulary/Journal (15 minutes) (due Thursday).
    Independent work on assignment. Due at the end of class.


    Thursday, Dec.. 22
    Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to discuss chapters 17-18 with their peers and finish the questions, definitions, and characterizations for those chapters.
    AGENDA:Turn in Journal entires (4).
    Group discussion of the novel to this point. Describe Thomas' feelings as he made the decision to squeeze past the connecting rods and step into the Maze.
    Independent work on assignment. Due at the end of class.


    Tuesday, January 3, 2017
    Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to discuss chapters 21-30 with their peers and finish the questions, definitions, and characterizations for those chapters.
    AGENDA: Quick quiz for students who received less than 70 on the previous one or for students who want to earn a higher grade.
    Small group work re discussion of chapters 21-30.
    1. List the most important events in these chapters.
    2. Draw or create pictures of the three most piovatal moments in the chapters. Include a key/names/descriptions where necessary.
    3. Choose ten vocabulary words that you thought were the hardest, define them and discuss with your team. See what percentage of your team also had trouble with them.
    4. Choose the "Golden Nugget" or main message for each of these chapters: 22, 24, 26, 27, 28, and 30. As a small group, brainstorm what an ice maze would look like that depicts the novel. Make a list of items needed in it and what changes would be necessary if the novel were set in a cold winter-type place.
    HmWk: Read chapters 31-32.


    Wednesday, January 4, 2017
    Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to share their group work from Tuesday and create a picture in their same groups of what a possible ice maze could look.
    AGENDA: Sharing of chapters 21-30.
    Creation of pictures from each group.
    HmWk: Read chapters 33-35.

    Thursday, January 5, 2017
    Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to create in pairs or singly a picture depicting chapters 31-35 and include the best golden nugget for the section.
    AGENDA: Paired work. Create one picture detailing what is going on in chapters 31-35. Choose one golden nugget/quote to depict the mian message. Turn this in.
    HmWk: Read chapters 36-37.

    Friday, January 6, 2017
    Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to read chapters 38-40 in class and in a paragraph explain what this section of the novel is about.
    AGENDA:Independent work reading. In a long paragraph, describe what is going on in chapters 36-40.
    HmWk: Finish assignment if incomplete. Due Monday at the latest. Begin reading next section. Chapters 41-50. finish chapters 41-45. Only need to do the definitions/phrases.


    Monday, January 9, 2017
    Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to read chapters 45-50 in class and complete the definitions.
    AGENDA:Students should turn in their homework: chapters 41-44 of definitions/phrases from The Maze Runner.
    Independent work reading the chapters and defining the vocabulary/phrases.
    Students may work on Journals. Six entries are due on Feb. 10.
    HmWk: Finish through chapter 50 for homework.

    Tuesday, January 10, 2017
    Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to work in small groups to brainstorm the ice maze project.
    AGENDA:Whole group:
    1.Discussion of possible things that should be part of the ice maze.
    2. Brainstorm responsibilities chosen
    3. Research online ice mazes to get ideas.
    4. Create a cool group name.
    Independent group work.
    Turn in your group name, members in your group and eachperson's role/responsiobilities, such as architect, costume designer, builder, ets.
    Don't foget to turn in chapters 41-50.

    Wednesday, January 11, 2017
    Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to discuss their ice maze projects as a whole class and turn in a possible picture of what the finished project might look like.
    AGENDA:Whole group discussion
    Independent drawing of the ice maze creation. (Break into parts and each person can draw what they envision.)
    On the back of the picture explain what your ice maze will be made from - the basic material.
    If time, students may work on Journals. Six are due by Friday, Feb. 10. None are due for the following week.
    Work on The Maze Runnervocabulary.

    Thursday-Friday, January 12-13, 2017
    Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to finish the novel and complete the multiple choice or definitions/phrases assignment.
    AGENDA:Teacher will read a couple of the final chapters.
    Finish reading quietly and/or complete the assignments.


    Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017
    Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to complete the assignment for chapters 51-the Epilogue, then work on their group projects.
    AGENDA:
    Turn in finished work.
    Independent work or group project work. Fine tune the details of the maze and what materials will be used. Assign parts. Begin building the maze if work completed.

    Wednesday-Thursday, Jan. 18-19, 2017
    Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to work on building their group ice maze projects.
    AGENDA:
    Answer any questions. Independent group work.

    Friday, Jan. 20, 2017
    Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to share their completed work to date with the class and receive constructive suggestions to improve the quality of the ice maze from their peers.
    AGENDA:
    Group sharing.
    Constructive suggestions.
    Independent group work if time. Projects due on Monday.


    Monday, Jan. 23: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to present their Ice Mazes to the class for feedback, then discuss in their groups how to improve them. Final mazes are due on Wednesday. There will be no more class time to complete.
    AGENDA:
    Final project presentation to class.
    Peer Evaluation from rubric.
    Individual group analysis and use of feedback and time to add/fix items for final presentation on Wednesday.
    Review for novel final.

    Tuesday, Jan. 24: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to take a test on The Maze Runner and pass with at least a 65.
    AGENDA:
    Log-on and take test.

    Wednesday, Jan. 25: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to present their final mazes to the class and complete a rubric for each project.
    AGENDA:
    Presentations with rubrics.

    Thursday, Jan. 26: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to take notes on the basics of Shakespeare's language and understand what the Globe Theatre was/is.
    AGENDA:
    Discussion re maze grades.
    Begin Shakespeare vocabulary and discuss the Globe Theatre in preparation for beginning Macbeth. Include the two main reasons witches and Scotland were incorporated into the play.
    HmWk: Look up the events (list at least 3) that occured throughout history that make actors/actresses/directors NEVER say the name Macbeth in the playhouse and why it's considered very bad luck.

    Friday, Jan. 27: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to read orally Act I, scenes i-iii in class.
    AGENDA:
    Character Handout. Review of characters, especially Macbeth, Lady Macbeth, Banquo, Macduff, and Lady Macduff.
    Read the first three scenes in Act I of Macbeth. HmWk: Finish reading scene iii for homework. List the three prophecies the witches told Macbeth and Banquo and draw a picture of the witches. (check internet for ideas)


    Monday, Jan. 30 (substitute): Students will work independently to list two (2) important quotes (who said, who said to and why important), write a short summary of Act I, scenes i-iii, and continue their character descriptions for those characters introduced in the first three scenes of Act I of Macbeth.
    Agenda:
    Students may use their phone to access the tranlated novel at https://www.enotes.com/topics/macbeth/etext/act-i
    1. Using the textbook or enotes website, individually find two important quotes from the first three scenes and write them down, including who said them, who the quote was said to and why it was important.
    2. Briefly summarize each of the first three scenes.
    3. Continue character analysis for the following characters: 3 witches, King Duncan, Malcolm, Macbeth, Banquo, and Ross/Lennox.
    4. Read scenes iv and v (pages 187-191); finish for homework.
    Quiz in class on Tuesday on the two scenes. (REMEMBER: you can use the translated version online at https://www.enotes.com/topics/macbeth/etext/act-i.)
    HmWk: Finish whatever was not completed during class for homework. Be prepared for a "pop" quiz.

    Tuesday, Jan. 31 (substitute): Students will orally read Act I, scenes vi-vii, continue their character descriptions for those characters introduced, and complete questions 1-5 on page 195 for Act I of Macbeth.
    Agenda:
    Finish Act I, scenes vi-vii. (https://www.enotes.com/topics/macbeth/etext/act-i)
    Add to character list.
    Complete the Reading Check on page 195, questions 1-5.

    SKIP ... Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017 (SKIP to next Feb. 1): Students will read the Commentary on pages 195-196 for Act I of Macbeth and discuss in groups.
    Agenda:
    Mini-Lesson: iambic pentameter with "jumping."
    Organize groups of 4, explain how to read (each person reads a part and then explains it to the rest of the group).
    1.Create a brief summary of no more than 2-3 lines per paragraph and turn it in with group members' names.
    2. Read the Literary Elements on page 196. Define "blank verse" and "iambic pentameter" and how they are related to Macbeth.
    3. 10 minutes of vocabulary at Java Game: Shakespeare's Vocabulary re Macbeth (see below).

    Thursday, Feb. 1: Mastery Objective: Students will read/act out Act II, scenes i-ii during class then write a short summary, and add to their character descriptions in Macbeth.
    Agenda:
    1. Go over homework (Ques. 1-5 at the end of Act I).
    2. Read Act II orally, scenes i-ii and scene iii through line 50 in class (Parts assigned).
    3. Watch the Porter scene (Act II, scene i) at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8csyAIUkdtY, then discuss in class. HmWk: Add details to character descriptions, including the Porter and Macduff.
    Thursday, Feb. 2, 2017: Students will complete Act ii scene iii and iv, then play the vocabulary from Macbeth activity.

    Agenda:
    1. Finish reading scene iii and read scene iv orally.
    Practice the vocabulary. Play against each other for the class winner!
    HmWk: With a partner answer the 10 questions on page 208. Keep practicing the vocabulary.

    Friday, Feb. 3, 2017: Students will in small groups complete literary circles on Act II.
    Agenda:
    1. Small group work:
    a. Character Describer Aficionado (checks everyone's work to make sure their character lists are up-to-date and accurate. Adds information through dialogue if needed.)
    b. Summarizer Extraordinaire (Write a brief summary of assigned section. Share with group.)
    c. Inspired Quoter (find at least 1-3 quotes per scene that are really important [golden nugget style!] and share with group who said it, who it was said to, and why it is imporant)
    d. Vocabulary Pundit (find at least 3-5 words per scene that you are unfamiliar with. Check with the group to see if they know the words. Define them and share with the group).
    2. Turn in homework: Reading Check on page 208 1-10 in class.
    HmWk: find a picture of the Globe Theater from 1599 and another one from today. Print them out side by side and turn in on Monday.


    Monday, Feb. 6, 2017: Students will review their answers to the questions on page 208 under "Reading Check" and begin Act III scenes i -iii.
    Agenda:
    1. Share Globe pictures with the class in small groups.
    2. Finish Friday's assignment re Literary circles. Answer any questions 1-10 (all parts) under "Reading Check" on page 208 about Act II.
    2. Complete at least 15 minutes of Macbeth Vocabulary or work on Journal.
    3. Read Act III, scene i-iii.
    HmWk: Complete questions 1-5 on page 223.

    Tuesday, Feb. 7 (Patriot's Parade): Students will complete at least three entries in their Journal if behind and then have discussions with the teacher about their group project grades.
    Agenda:
    Journal entries, group project discussions, vocabulary if time.

    Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017 Students will able to show their understanding of Act III by watching https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1SPfUwavfbY (Act III i), and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DcRBKvHECvw (Act III iv), then individually summarizing scenes i-vi briefly through bullets.
    Agenda:
    1. Watch the videos then briefly summarize scenes i-iv through bullets. Include what happens and who is in each scene.

    2. Read scenes iv-vi, then write a brief summary of those scenes.
    3. Answer questions 6-10 on page 223. (REMEMBER you can use the website https://www.enotes.com/topics/macbeth/etext/act-i for help in translating the dialogue.)
    HmWk: Finish whatever you did not complete. Have it ready to turn in on Thursday.

    Feb. 9, 10, 13 = all snow days

    Tuesday, Feb. 14: Students will discuss Act III in its entirety, turn in answers for questions 6-10 on page 223 and summary of Act III, read Act IV i orally, and then show their understanding by rewriting the witches scene from line 48-134.
    Agenda:
    Happy Valentine's Day! Class discussion.
    1. Turn in questions 6-10 on page 223 and summary for Act II by scenes.
    2. Act IV i read orally.
    Watch the scene at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v6Ebfe90aeQ.
    What do you think Macbeth is really thinking during his time with the witches? 4. Independent assignment: Act IV i lines 48-134 to be rewritten into today's English. (This should be different from the translation version. Bee creative!) Due Wednesday.
    HmWk: Journals were due last Friday. There were to be six (6) dated, preferably typed, entries. I will take today, but no extra credit points.

    Wednesday, Feb. 15: Students will show their understanding of Act IV i by sharing their rewrites of the scene in small groups.
    Agenda:
    1. Small group work re witch's scene.
    2. Read Act IV, scene ii independently. Find a scene at youtube.com that expertly and interestingly shows this murder scene. Summarize in bullets what is happening. Due at end of class.

    HmWk: Finish whatever not completed in class for homework.

    Thursday-Friday , Feb. 16-17: Students will understand why Macduff cries vengeance on Macbeth after reading the translation of Act IV scene iii in class quietly, drawing a picture of the murder scene, and answering questions 1-5 on page 238.
    You have two (2) days to complete the assignments below and send them to me, except for the picture.
    Agenda:
    1. Watch the murder scene (ii) at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HMbB2PHBXmg.
    2. Draw a picture of the murder scene including all those in attendance. Label the people if not obvious. Put in the InBox.
    3. Answer these two questions in pairs and send them to me through email:
    a) If you were Macduff, would you have left your family?
    b) What would YOU have done once you found out your wife and babes had been murdered by Macbeth's "hand"?
    4. Read Act IV scene iii orally in your group (if in cafeteria - please read silently) or with the larger part of the class.
    5. Answer the following questions in pairs and send to me through email.
    a) Describe Macduff's feelings as he is told by Ross of his family's murder.
    b) Describe Ross's feelings as he tells Macduff the horrific news. Send your answers to me with names on the document.
    6. Answer questions 1-5 on page 238 (printed below for your convenience).
    a. What is Macbeth told by the Apparitions?
    b. What does Macbeth learn about Banquo's "issue"?
    c. What crime is Macduff accused of by Macbeth?
    d. Why does Malcolm at first suspect Macduff of treachery?
    e. Why does Macduff blame himself for the death of his wife and children?
    Thursday HmWk: Define pathos (page 1128 or online) and explain Ross's feelings toward Macduff. Make the connection to pathos please. Send this to me through email.
    VACATION HmWk: Check out March 2 below for final projects. Decide over vacation which project you want to do and set up a plan for completing it.


    Happy February Vacation!


    Monday, Feb. 27: Students will act out Act V, scenes, i, iii, iv, v,vii, and viii, answering questions as the play proceeds relating to important quotes and references.
    Agenda:
    Review the play to this point.
    Orally read Act V, with teacher explanations for scenes ii and vi.
    Students should understand the three witches' prophecies, the three apparitions' prophecies, know what happened to Lady Macbeth, Macbeth and Macduff, and who is the new king and where he will be crowned.
    Know "candle" metaphor for life
    Why Lady Macbeth fears the dark
    What shows the reader that this is a warlike act?
    When does Macbeth not feel invincible?
    Who kills Macbeth? How?

    Quotes: Who said, who said to and significance: "Out damned spot!..." Act Vi 25-28
    "I have almost forgot the taste of fears." Act V v 9.
    "Out, out, brief candle!...Signifying nothing." Act V v 23-28
    "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow...time" Act V v 19-21
    HmWk: 1. Do the "Reading Check" on page 249, questions 1-10.

    Tuesday Feb. 28: Students will turn in the "Reading Check" on page 249, then choose one of the major characters and analyze their personalities citing the reactions of others, the person's actions or conversations, and soliloquies.

    Agenda: 1. Turn in the questions and email the answers to me or use a Google document and share with me.
    2. See page 250, #2 under "The Play as a Whole." Analyze one of the following characters using particular lines in the play to support your response. Macbeth, Lady Macbeth, Banquo, or Macduff.
    When analyzing a character, be sure to include physical and emotional information that makes the character whole. Is the character a protagonist (hero/tragic hero) or antagonist (villain), is s/he dynamic (changing) or static (unchanging), what are their relationships with others, and/or what lessons did your character learn?
    Be sure to cit act, scene and line. For example "II iii line 16" is Act 2, scene 3, line 78. You may use a graph or organizer to complete this assignment if it is easier (See handouts).

    Ex Cr: Write down a one-two line summary for each scene with a partner, then create a tableau vivante for one of the following scenes.
    Tableau vivante: for scenes i (group of 3), iii (group of 4), v (group of 3) or viii (group of 5) .


    Wednesday, March 1: Students will discuss the ending of the play and the play in its entirety focusing on important quotations and imagery that reflect the mood/tone of the play.
    Agenda:
    Discussion of ending of Act V and answer any remaining questions. Review for final.
    Famous Quotes: who said, who was it said to, and what does it mean?
    Imagery: examples referring to darkness, blood, nature, and the supernatural
    HmWk: Watch the cartoon version of Macbeth at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qfnUq2_0FOY

    Thursday, March 2: Students will take an online final on Macbeth and choose their final project.
    Agenda:
    FINAL

    Topic Choices
    1. Create a rap that Macbeth could recite when he is fighting Macduff.
    This should be at least three minutes long. (individual)

    2. Research and draw/create a prototype of the original Globe Theater. (1-2 students)

    3. Create a day-by-day detailed Diary for Lady Macbeth.
    Include the day her husband arrives with the news, the day Macbeth kills King Duncan,
    the day Banquo arrives as a ghost to their celebration dinner, the day Macduff's family is killed,
    and her final three days of life. This should be more than a document.
    "Bee" creative! (1-2 students)

    4. Research four famous paintings depicting characters in Macbeth
    (these must be of different characters, so all can't be of the withes for example),
    describe the paintings in detail, the artist (find out a little bit abut the artist also),
    where each painting is housed, what characters the paintings depict and
    who the actor/actress/es is/are if applicable.
    Explain the painting's significance to the play (act/scene).
    Find out how much each painting is worth and why each one is valuable. (pair)

    5. Create a realistic stage for the final battle scene in Macbeth including props. (individual)

    6. Research at least four famous people (total of 8) for two of the following:
    Macbeth, Lady Macbeth, Banquo, and/or Macduff,
    over the last 100 years who have played Macbeth and Lady Macbeth on stage and
    include their picture as a regular person, a picture of each in costume, and
    each actor/actresses' acting resume. (pair)

    7. Read the play Signifying Nothing's review.
    Explain how you think this modern day version of Macbeth would play to an audience today.
    Go to http://www.ita.org.au/2016/11/signifying-nothing-reviewed-by-gordon-the-optom/ for the review.
    Design the stage for this modern version of Macbeth.
    Assign modern day actors/actresses to the roles listed in the review and explain why you chose each.

    8. Check out the website http://www.pathguy.com/macbeth.htm
    and after reading at least three of the amazing sections, share the information with the class
    through a Powerpoint or detailed research paper.
    Include who the author of this site is and what his credentials are. Include linked pictures.
    Check out the links in each section and add this information to your presentation. (Individual)

    9. Write at least a three page typed double spaced essay, with cited evidence, answering one of the following prompts: (individual)
    A. "How does Macbeth's character change throughout the course of the play?"
    B. "Explain how Macbeth, the character, is a tragic hero."
    C. "What are the dangers of excessive ambition? Connect this to the real world."
    D. "What is lost or gained in the quest for success? Connect this to the real world."

    10. Student Choice: If you have had enough of William Shakespeare, individually read one of the following short stories/myth:
    Amy Tan's "Rules of the Game"
    (https://jg019.k12.sd.us/eng1/Assignment%20Documents/Rules%20of%20the%20Game.pdf)
    or
    "Icarus and Daedalus" from Mythology
    (http://www.ontarioteacher.org/reading7/index_htm_files/Icarus%20and%20Daedalus%20Myth.pdf)
    and present it to the class in a creative fashion.
    Include characters, plot, setting, tone, and emphasize theme.
    If you chose the myth, include your responses to the following questions as well:
    A. Is Daedalus responsible for his son’s death?
    B. How is flight still fascinating to today's youth?
    C. Create a map of Sicily and the Icarian Sea.
    D. Why did Daedalus hang up his wings both emotionally and physically (beyond the fact that his son had died)? What were his emotions?
    Check out the following websites also to add information to your rpesentation: https://www.greekmyths-greekmythology.com/myth-of-daedalus-and-icarus/ and https://www.greekmyths-greekmythology.com/daedalus-inventor-ancient-greece/.
    HmWk: Work on project. Due Friday, Mar. 9-10.


    Friday, March 3: Students will complete independent work on their final Macbeth projects.
    Agenda:
    Review of Act II and III quotes.
    Student Independent Work: Macbeth final project.


    Monday, March 6: Students will independently on their Macbeth projects.
    Agenda:
    Independent work on projects.

    Tuesday, March 7: Students will review for final on Macbeth.
    Agenda:
    Review quotes for Acts IV and V + vocabulary.
    Independent work on Final Project -due Thursday/Friday.

    Wednesday, March 8: Students will take a final on the play Macbeth.
    Agenda:
    Final online. If time ... students will work on their final project.

    Thursday, March 9: Students will work independently on their final projects or present if finished.
    Agenda:
    Independent work/Early finished project presentations.

    Friday, March 10: Students will present their final projects.
    Agenda:
    Presentations


    Monday, March 13: Students will finish presenting their final projects and play catch-up.
    Agenda:
    Final projects if time needed.
    Catch-up and assignments outstanding.

    Tuesday-Wednesday, March 14-15: Students will review for their final and complete any outstanding work.
    Agenda:
    Final Review
    Work independently to turn in outstanding work. Wednesday is the LAST day to turn in late work.

    Thursday, March 17: Students will take their English department final.
    Agenda:
    Final for English IV
    YEAH! You made it!




















































































































    Stop***Arret***Stop***Stoppen***Stop***Stop***
    DO NOT READ BEYOND THIS POINT***
    Stop***Stop***Parar***Stop***Alto***Stop***















































    Friday-Sept. 9- Monday Sept. 12 - Presentations
    Homework: Read the short story the class agreed to for Tuesday, Sept. 13. .

    Tuesday, Sept. 13
    Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to discuss "Shooting an Elephant" and answer the questions at the end of the story.
    AGENDA:Group I: 10 minutes of vocabulary or Group II: read quietly the handout while underlining pertinent parts.
    Discussion in small groups.
    Answer the questions.

    Wednesday, Sept. 14 - Thursday Sept. 15
    Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to choose a topic for their college essays or choose one from the Common App website or write to the teacher prompt.
    AGENDA: Group 1 - 30 minutes: Discussion of what a good topic and intro look like. Show the prompt to the teacher, if OK, write an introduction. Turn them in.
    Group 2 - 30 minutes: Discussion of short story answers.
    Then swap assignments.
    Teacher prompt: All of the branches of the military require a Physical Fitness Test, which includes pushups, situps and a two mile run. Male applicants must be able to complete 42 pushups in two minutes, 53 sit-ups in two minutes and complete the 2-mile run in under 16 minutes. Female applicants must be able to complete 19 push ups in two minutes, 53 sit-ups in two minutes and complete the 2-mile run in under 19 minutes. Explain why a physical fitness test is a necessary part of military life and why there are differences between males and females. Include examples of when being physically fit are mandatory. Search for facts and include them in your essay. Plan on ending your essay with a cool military (not movie) quote and explain the connection between the essay and the quote.

    Friday, Sept. 16
    Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to complete any unfinished work from the week including vocabulary time, journaling, essay, or short story work.
    AGENDA: Group 1 Computer time - 30 minutes
    Group 2: Catch-up time - 30 minutes.



    Monday, Sept. 19 - Wednesday Sept. 21, Friday, Sept. 23 Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to read the first six chapters of The Maze Runner and individually create one multiple choice question per chapter from their readings.
    AGENDA: Group 1 Computer time - Vocabulary 15 minutes, then begin reading at https://archive.org/stream/pdfy-m42BEGOANgkYhtq2/The%20Maze%20Runner_djvu.txt.
    Group 2: Begin reading the novel. During the last fifteen minutes, complete vocabulary work on computers.
    Swap groups each day. In other words, Group 2 begins with Vocab on Tuesday.

    Question example:
    1. What genre is The Maze Runner?
    a. Nonfiction
    b. Fiction
    c. Science fiction
    d. Autobiography

    KEY
    What genre is The Maze Runner?
    a. Nonfiction
    b. Fiction
    c. Science fiction
    d. Autobiography

    Thursday, Sept. 22
    Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to brainstorm creating a maze and research mazes from old England gardens to haunted house style.
    AGENDA: Questions re The Maze Runner - update on schedule re 6 chapters.
    Discussion re creating a maze. List possible elements from the novel that could be incorporated into this project. I.e. moving walls.
    Research into mazes with a partner.
    Present findings to class.
    Questions? Ideas? timeline.



    Monday, Sept. 26 Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to answer questions relating to the first six chapters of The Maze Runner and discuss which objects so far should be in their haunted maze.
    AGENDA: Group 1: Computer time - Vocabulary 15 minutes.
    Group 2: Reading time re The Maze Runner
    Group together for teacher read.
    Swap roles
    HmWk: continue reading through chapter 9. Work on final draft of your college essay.


    Tuesday, Sept. 27 Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to create multiple choice questions relating to chapters 7-9 of The Maze Runner and add to their list additional objects that should be included in their haunted maze.
    AGENDA: Group 2: Computer time - Vocabulary 15 minutes.
    Group 1: Read chapters 10-11 quietly for 15 minutes.
    Swap roles.
    Create one multiple choice question for each chapter with a partner.
    Novel discussion.
    HmWk: continue reading through chapter 12. Work on final draft of your college essay.


    Wednesday, Sept. 28 Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to complete their multiple choice questions relating to chapters 7-12 of The Maze Runner and add to their list additional objects that should be included in their haunted maze.
    AGENDA: Group 1: Computer time - Vocabulary 15 minutes.
    Group 2: Read chapters 13 quietly for 15 minutes.
    Swap roles.
    Write down the "golden nugget" for chapter 13 and share with a partner. Explain why it epitomizes that chapter. Turn this in.
    HmWk: Continue reading through chapter 15. Work on final draft of your college essay.


    Thursday, Sept. 29 Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to create their multiple choice questions relating to chapters 13-15 of The Maze Runner and add to their list additional objects that should be included in their haunted maze in their Haunted Maze groups.
    AGENDA: Group 1: Computer time - Vocabulary 15 minutes.
    Group 2: Read chapters 16 quietly for 15 minutes.
    Swap roles.
    Create multiple choice questions for chapters 13-15. Due today.
    HmWk: Continue reading through chapter 16. Work on final draft of your college essay.


    Friday, Sept. 30 Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to create two multiple choice questions relating to chapter 16 of The Maze Runner and add to their list additional objects that should be included in their haunted maze.
    AGENDA: Group 1: Computer time - Vocabulary 15 minutes.
    Group 2: Create multiple choice questions.
    Swap roles.
    Class Quiz using student generated questions.
    Work individually on finalizing college essays if time.
    HmWk: Continue reading through chapter 17-20. Finalize the final draft of your college essay.



    Monday, October 3 - Tuesday, October 4: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to in pairs create two multiple choice questions per chapter for chapters 17-20 of The Maze Runner and list ten vocabulary words, including their defiitions, that they did not know during their reading.
    Monday AGENDA: Group 1: Computer time - Journal 10 minutes. Student choice from Journal prompt page. Choose your prompt, then type it. You may use your phone to access the prompt page. Find your partner and create the questions and find the appropriate vocabulary. Once created, type them up.
    Group 2: Begin multiple choice questions and vocabualry assignment.
    Swap assignments after 10 minutes.
    HmWk: Continue reading through chapter 21-22. Finalize the final draft of your college essay if you haven't already.

    Tuesday AGENDA: Group 2: Computer time - Vocabulary 10 minutes. Student choice from Journal prompt page. Choose your prompt, then type it. You may use your phone to access the prompt page. Find your partner and create the questions for chapters 21-23 and find the appropriate vocabulary. Once created, type them up.
    Group 1: Work on multiple choice questions and vocabulary assignment with a partner. (Chpaters 21-23 + fourteen vocabulary words, 2 per chapter)
    Monday HmWk: Continue reading through chapters 21-23. Finalize the final draft of your college essay if you haven't already.
    Continue reading through chapter 24. Finalize the final draft of your college essay if you haven't already.

    Wednesday, October 5: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to work in pairs to create a picture for each of chapters 21 and 22 of The Maze Runner and list ten vocabulary words, including their defiitions, that they did not know during their reading.
    AGENDA: Group 1: Read chapter 23.
    Group 2: Picture and vocabulary creation for Chapters 21-22.
    Swap assignments after 30 minutes.
    HmWk: Continue reading through chapter 24.

    Thursday, October 6: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to work independently to read chapters 25 - 28 of The Maze Runner and create a list of all the characters with a short description of each.
    AGENDA: Group A go to the computers and spend 15 minutes on The Maze Runner vocabulary then begin reading chapters 25-28 creating a character list.
    Group B should begin reading, then at 10:20, group B should swap places with group A and complete the vocabulary activity, then continue reading.
    Anyone with a hard copy or who can read the text on their phone should stay on the chair side of the room for the independent reading. After everyone has completed the vocabulary assignment, only those who are reading the text online should be at the computers.

    Friday, October 7: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to sketch out the character descriptions from The Maze Runner, taking notes from their peers descriptions.
    AGENDA: In small groups, students will share their descriptions and add to their own notes. The class will rejin and go over the character descriptions.
    HmWk Finish reading through Chapter 31 for Tuesday. Keep a list of new vocabulary words you don't understand and add to your character list if there are any new people introduced.


    Tuesday, October 11: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to underline unknown vocabulary and take notes on setting from The Maze Runner reading of chapters 32-33.
    AGENDA: Discussion of the settings with whole group.
    Students who missed test make it up.
    Teacher read chapters of 32-33. Students read chapter 34 and take a pop quiz on it.

    HmWk: Add elements to your character and setting description lists as you read. Finish reading chapters 34-35 for Wednesday.

    Wednesday, October 12: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to sketch out and describe in writing three main settings from The Maze Runner, after discussing it with their peer group, and taking notes.
    AGENDA: Groups 1-3 create the three settings in their Maze groups.
    Groups 4a, 4b, 5 and 6 work on The Maze Runner vocabulary.
    Swap after 30 minutes.
    Once finished, students should read quietly chapters 36-39.
    HmWk: Choose music for chapter 38's pages 162-163. Bring it in on Thursday. Finish reading through chapter 39.

    Thursday, October 13: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to share their three main settings from The Maze Runner. After group discussion, students will add to their drawings and turn them in.
    AGENDA:Groups 1-3 share three settings
    Group 4a, 4b, 5 and 6 read quietly chapters 40-43. Create 1 multiple choice question for each chapter. If working in pairs, then create two from each chapter. Include a list of vocabulary you are unsure or.
    Swap after 30 minutes.
    HmWk: Finish any incomplete work for homework.

    Friday, October 14: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to work on their mazes based on The Maze Runner in their Maze groups.
    AGENDA: Turn in MC questions and unknown vocabulary from chapters 40-43.
    Independent work on the prototype of the Mazes.
    HmWk: Read chapters 44-52 for homework. Underline or write down any unknown or confusing vocabulary


    Monday, October 17: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to create MC questions from chapters 44-52 based on The Maze Runner in pairs.
    AGENDA: Group A = Vocabulary for 15 minutes.
    Group B: One question per chapter, per person.
    Swap groups. Turn in work.
















































































































































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    DAY 2 Sept. 2
    Friday: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to take the multiple choice portion of the English IV pretest.
    AGENDA: Warm-up: Find a seat not next to someone else in the class.
    Pre-test
    "This I Believe" Muhammed Ali"s "This I Believe." Discussion.
    Homework: Respond to the essay. How did it affect you emotionally? Did it remind you of anything? What did you think of it? Are you glad you heard it? Why? What made it good or was it "great"? :-)

    Sept. 3 - Thursday: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to take the essay portion of the English IV pretest.
    AGENDA: Turn in homework re the essay. Warm-up: Find a seat not next to someone else in the class.
    Pre-test essay
    Homework: Continue researching topics for the college essay.

    Sept. 4 - Friday: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to set up an account on the computer (Journalism/English drive), begin a database and be introduced to the Vocabulary.
    AGENDA: Warm-up: Log onto the computers. Go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BEwg8TeipfQ and listen to the YouTube.
    Discussion of You Tube video re Building Bridges in the Brain. Go back to chairs. Discussion.
    Pre-test overview.
    Introduction to computer lab, Quia Web sites, Vocabulary introduction and account set up.
    Read one college essay to students.
    Reminder:
    Journal entry #2 due Tuesday: Choose one entry from my Writing Journal site (www.quia.com/pages/abee/page3) and respond to it.

    Homework Bring in three topics for a college essay on Tuesday. Have a great Labor Day!


    Sept. 8 - Tuesday: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to brainstorm ideas for a college essay.
    AGENDA: Warm-up: Discuss why a college essay is important. (Remember "the handshake.")
    Look up Common APP questions
    Write down 2 topics.
    Discuss with a partner. Ask questions about the topic.
    Discuss in large group. Choose a final topic.
    HmWk: Write the thesis statement.

    Sept. 9 - Wednesday: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to revise a college essay thesis.
    AGENDA: Warm-up: Type triple space your thesis. Print and return to desk side.
    Circle all the Is, underline all the vocabulary over a 10th grade level, check punctuation and capitalization. Give to another student to proof.
    Check with teacher.
    If OK, go back to the computers and write your first two paragraphs. If not, revise.

    Sept. 10 - Thursday: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to revise the first three paragraphs of a college essay thesis.
    AGENDA: Warm-up: Turn in your rough drafts, then log-on and complete a Journal entry using the teacher's Journal site. Please respond to # 11. (http://www.quia.com/pages/abee/page3) Don't forget to copy and paste the prompt and date the entry.
    Read the college essays in the packet and make a list of what makes each one excellent.
    Class discussion.
    Independent work on your college essay.
    HmWk: Revise first four paragraphs of the college essay.

    Sept. 11 - Friday: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will be able to write their final paragraph of their college essay.
    AGENDA: Warm-up: Reread the final paragraphs of the college essay packets. What stands out? Are their any commonalities? Anything unusual?
    Class discussion.
    Independent work to complete rough drafts. Rough Drafts of college essay due Monday at the latest.


    Monday, Sept. 14: M.O. Students will be able to differentiate similes and metaphors by compiling a list from the Internet along with a definition.
    AGENDA:
    Journal - your choice from Ms. Bee's Journal. Vocabulary intro. (Java Game: The Princeton Review Hit Parade - 1A), metaphor/simile small group work. Sharing.

    Definitions: metaphor - a comparison between essentially unlike things without a word such as "like" or "as." Ex: "My love is a red, red rose."
    simile - A figure of speech involving a comparison between unlike things using "like" or "as" or "as though." Ex: "My love is like a red, red rose."
    Add these definitions to your notebook under the section marked "Literary Terminology." Homework:
    1. Create a list of at least ten (10) each of metaphors and similes. (define if not obvious)
    2. Find one poem with at least one simile and one metaphor (underline them), OR create a silly one yourself with at least five combined similes and metaphors. Be prepared to share with the class. You may use rhymezone.com for additional help.
    HmWk: Go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AJ_N3XH3ntI and watch Beowulf Parts 1-6.


    Tuesday, Sept. 15: M.O. Students will be able to use the Internet to find information about Beowulf, then share with their peers.
    AGENDA:
    Vocabulary with a partner. Discuss the movie Beowulf. Mini-lesson on English background.
    Warm-up: Journal: describe Grendel in Beowulf Beowulf search time
    Beowulf (small group sharing)
    Teacher will read introduction to Beowulf in the textbook on pages 1-12. HmWk:Write or draw a detailed description of the main character in Beowulf with additional information from the Internet.
    Include a list of "fun" information about Beowulf discovered in the small groups.

    Wednesday, Sept. 16: M.O. Students will be able to describe Beowulf, through an exploration of pictures shared with peers.
    Agenda:
    Warm-up: Vocabulary practice.
    Students will research the internet to find "cool" pictures of Beowulf.
    Students will then describe the pictures using similes and metaphors and explain the mood in the pictures.

    Thursday, Sept. 17: M.O. Students will be able to finalize their college essay in class.
    Agenda:
    Warm-up: Vocabulary practice
    Independent work finalizing the college essay.

    Friday, Sept. 18: M.O. Using Type II writing, students will be able to write a detailed description of the mood changes in the following trailers.

    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    Vocabulary-Off for the crown
    Define mood. Then finish watching the following YouTube videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fuWf9fP-A-U&list=PLwRF5bRIjrMxOuA_2Wp2lmObjQot3XHfo&index=1 (Mary Poppins trailer).
    Then go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2T5_0AGdFic&list=PLwRF5bRIjrMxOuA_2Wp2lmObjQot3XHfo&index=2 and watch that trailer. Make a list of what changes the "mood."

    Now go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dNk-Tu1xNsU&list=PLwRF5bRIjrMxOuA_2Wp2lmObjQot3XHfo&index=11, then watch https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KmkVWuP_sO0&index=12&list=PLwRF5bRIjrMxOuA_2Wp2lmObjQot3XHfo.
    What makes the difference in the two sets of videos? How do the directors change the mood so dramatically?
    Describe the mood in the first video; then describe it in its changed video. How can a writer make these changes in a novel or short story? List words that would make a difference.
    Complete handout.

    HmWk: Watch one more duo for mood over the weekend. Choose a "color" and a piece of music that puts you in a positive mood and a color and a piece of music that depresses you. How would an author change the mood from calm to boisterous? List the words he/she might use. Bring them in on Monday. Have fun! :-)

    Monday-Sept. 21: M.O. Students will be able to take a pre-test on.

    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    Journal: MP3 Norman Corwin "I'm sorry."
    Review Vocab for 1A. Take the vocabulary Quiz for 1A (sign in). Then practice for "The Princeton Review Hit Parade 1B. (Test on Friday)

    Share homework re music and colors that affect your mood.
    HmWk: Play the vocabulary quiz game for 1B. Test on Friday. Finish your college essays.


    Tuesday-Sept. 22: M.O. Students will be able to write a description of entering their home, one calmly and one that creates a totally different mood, such as fear.

    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    Practice for "The Princeton Review Hit Parade 1B. (Test on Friday). 15 minutes

    Type a paragraph describing you entering your home after school. Then change the vocabulary so that the description goes from a calm mood to a scary or fearful one. Use your mood color wheel.
    Read your two descriptions to your neighbor.
    Have the neighbor underline the words that changed the mood from calm to scary/fearful.
    Begin reading Address Unknown by Katherine Kressman Taylor at http://www.acobas.net/teaching/textbook/address/addressunknown.pdf
    HmWk: Play the vocabulary quiz game for 1B. Test on Friday. Finish your college essays.

    Wednesday, Sept. 23-24: M.O. Students will read Address Unknown (http://www.acobas.net/teaching/textbook/address/addressunknown.pdf) and discuss its structure and theme. (http://www.gutenberg.org/files/1164/1164-h/1164-h.htm).

    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    Vocab. and
    Overview: First published as a short story in 1938, this epistolary novel quickly became a publishing sensation and was hailed by the New York Times as "The most effective indictment of Nazism to appear in fiction." The novella is related entirely through the correspondence of two men, Martin Schulse and Max Eisenstein. Though German by birth both men have been living in the USA during the interwar period.
    The novel opens in 1932 when Martin returns to Germany. The initial letters convey warmth and affection between the two men; they have a shared past, shared cultural reference points, and it is implied that Max's sister, Griselle, has been Martin's lover.
    Review definitions of structure and theme. (short story/novella?)
    Read Address Unknown orally and silently.
    Characters are: Martin, Max, Elsa, Griselle, and Heinrich.
    Identify the structure (see handout) and theme of the story.

    In groups of no more than three (3) answer the following questions using supporting details/page citations:
    1. How does Taylor uses the voice of Martin to convey his private thoughts to Max on the rise of Hitler?
    2. How does Martin’s perspective on Hitler changes and how this is reflected in the voice employed in his letters as the novella progresses?
    3. How does Taylor use language to convey how Max’s trust in Martin changes as the novella progresses?
    4. How does Taylor manipulate the voice of Martin to communicate details of his affair with Griselle to the reader?
    5. How does Taylor use the voice of Martin to convey his changing attitude toward the situation in Germany?
    6. How is Martin's perspective influenced by Nazi propaganda as the novella progresses?
    7. How does Taylor use the voice of Martin to convey his attitude toward the Jews through his response to the killing of Griselle?
    8. How does this impact a) Max's s relationship with Martin and b) the broader situation in Germany as the novella progresses?
    9. How does Taylor manipulate the voice and the language of Max to incriminate Martin?
    10. Why does he do this?
    Complete the questions through Google docs or email or on the phone with your partners and turn it for homework on Friday.
    HmWk: Study for the vocabulary quiz.


    Friday, Sept. 25: M.O. Students will be be able to take a vocabulary quiz on the Princeton Review 1B with at least 70% accuracy.

    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    ten-minute crowning review.
    Quiz
    Discussion using notes of Address Unknown.


    Monday, Sept. 28: M.O. Students will be be able to take a test on Katherine Kressman Taylor's Address Unknown with at least 70% accuracy.

    Agenda:
    Warm-up -
    Log on to the computer. Go to quia.com web page. Practice Vocab 1C
    (www.quia.com/pages/abee/page5).
    Click on the Address Unknown quiz. Log-in and take the test.
    HmWk: Begin studying Princeton Review vocabulary 1C. Quiz on Friday.

    Tuesday, Sept. 29: M.O. Students will be be able to identify symbolism and allegory in fables, short stories, and poems.

    Agenda:
    Warm-up
    - Discuss symbolism/allegory handout from Monday.
    Read The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein. Identify the symbolism.
    Research fables and find one to share with the class. Identify its symbolism.
    Presentations.

    Wednesday, Sept. 30: M.O. Students will be introduced to and begin reading Jack London's existentialist novel The Iron Heel (http://www.gutenberg.org/files/1164/1164-h/1164-h.htm).

    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    Journal: MP3 - respond.
    Discuss existentialism.
    Existentialism – Definition:
    Existentialism in the broader sense is a 20th century philosophy that is centered upon the analysis of existence and of the way humans find themselves existing in the world. The notion is that humans exist first and then each individual spends a lifetime changing their essence or nature.
    In simpler terms, existentialism is a philosophy concerned with finding self and the meaning of life through free will, choice, and personal responsibility. The belief is that people are searching to find out who and what they are throughout life as they make choices based on their experiences, beliefs, and outlook.
    An existentialist believes that a person should be forced to choose and be responsible without the help of laws, ethnic rules, or traditions.

    Existentialism takes into consideration the underlying concepts:
    Human free will
    Human nature is chosen through life choices
    A person is best when struggling against their individual nature, fighting for life
    Decisions are not without stress and consequences
    There are things that are not rational
    Personal responsibility and discipline is crucial
    Society is unnatural and its traditional religious and secular rules are arbitrary
    Worldly desire is futile

    Begin the novel. Set up a timeline.
    Discuss chapter 1.

    Thursday, Oct. 1: M.O. Students will be begin reading Jack London's existentialist novel The Iron Heel (http://www.gutenberg.org/files/1164/1164-h/1164-h.htm).

    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    Vocab practice: Quiz on Friday
    Explanation of structure and theme of novel.
    Discuss David Kessel review.
    Timeline: 3 pages a day.
    HmWk: Draw a picture of Ernest from his description.
    Finish reading through page 8.
    Finish college essay.
    Vocab quiz on Friday ... STUDY! :-)

    Friday, Oct. 2: M.O. Students will take a vocabulary quiz with at least 70% accuracy.

    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    Vocabulary matching practice
    Quiz
    Continue reading Jack London's existentialist novel The Iron Heel (http://www.gutenberg.org/files/1164/1164-h/1164-h.htm). Pages 9-11.
    HmWk Read The Iron Heel. through page 15 (Finish Chapter 1)


    Monday-Wednesday, Oct. 5-7: M.O. Students will continue to read London's The Iron Heel and create a vocabulary log.

    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    Vocabulary matching practice 1D

    Create a vocabulary log of all the highlighted words. Footnoted ones do not need to be included.
    Continue reading Jack London's existentialist novel The Iron Heel (http://www.gutenberg.org/files/1164/1164-h/1164-h.htm). Chapter 2-3.
    HmWk Read The Iron Heel. Finish Chapter 3 for Thursday. Make sure that all underlined words have been defined.

    Thursday, Oct. 8: M.O. Students will continue to read Chapter 4 of London's The Iron Heel and continue their vocabulary log.

    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    Vocabulary Activity
    Taking turns, read orally in small groups Chapter 4 of London's The Iron Heel
    Describe the characters in Chapter 3 who spoke about the loss of Jackson's arm.
    Update the vocabulary log.
    HmWk: Update the Vocabulary for Chapter 4, describe Colonel Ingram from Avis's point of view, describe the conversation with the journalist Percy Layton, What do you think Avis thought of Mr. Wickson, Mr. Pertonwaithe, Mrs. Wickson and Mrs. Pertonwaithe?

    Friday, Oct. 9 (1/2 day): M.O. Students will take a vocabulary quiz and earn at least 70%.

    Agenda:
    Log-on
    Quiz
    The Iron Heel discussion and vocabulary check. HmWk Read Chapter 5 of the novel and practice Chapter 1 vocabulary on Quia.


    Tuesday, Oct. 13: M.O. Students will analyze Chapter 5 of London's The Iron Heel by choosing "golden nuggets" and explaining them.

    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    Vocab for the novel. Chapter 1
    Chapter 5 paired work from the novel. Choose two "golden nuggets" from chapter 5 to elucidate the main message of the chapter or the novel.
    Share with peers.
    Do vocabulary work re Chapter 5. Finish for homework. Read Chapter 6 (VI) for homework.

    Wednesday, Oct. 14: M.O. Students will orally read in small groups Chapter 6 (VI)of London's The Iron Heel.

    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    Sarcasm Handout + You-Tube video; The Iron Heel Student Chosen Vocabulary
    Sarcasm discussion re U-Tube.
    1. Summarize Chapter VI. 2. What is adumberated (foreshadowed) in Chapter VI?
    Orally read in small groups/teacher-led Chapater 7 (VII) of The Iron Heel.
    Complete vocabulary definitions.
    HmWk 1. Write a descriptive paragraph for each of two characters from the novel. 2. Find a really good example of sarcasm or satire online (YouTube OK if no longer than five minutes) and bring it in for sharing on Thursday.

    Thursday, Oct. 15: M.O. Students will read silently as the teacher reads the beginning of Chapter 8 (VIII) from London's The Iron Heel, then in small groups they will finish the chapter.

    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    Share sarcasm videos and study for vocabulary quiz on Friday.
    Teacher-led with explanations Chapter VIII reading. (pages 66-69)
    Small group reading with each person taking a part. (pages 70-76). HmWk: Complete vocabulary words, study for Vocab. quiz, Add shapter characters and a one line description to your list: Mr. Owen, Mr. Kowalt, Mr. Asmunsen, and Mr. Calvin.
    Friday, Oct. 16: M.O. Students will be able to take a vocabulary quiz with at least 70% accuracy.

    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    Vocabulary review
    Vocabulary Quiz.
    Discussion of The Iron Heel through Chapter 8 (VIII).
    HmWk: Look at the following topics and think about what you'd like to write a sarcastic essay on for Monday: (about 1-2 pages long)
    Sarcastic Essay Topics

    Why you should believe every word of an Infomercial (pick your favorite).
    Why people like watching funny cat videos.
    Why I am not an expert at anything but gaming.
    Why watching violent video doesn't fry your brains.
    Why smoking is good for you.
    What your driving instructor never told you.
    What your dog is really thinking.
    Why I love it when my computer freezes up.
    Why the customer is never right.
    Why teenagers deserve to have the worst jobs for the worst pay.
    Why the clothes do make the man/woman.
    Why I really need my Starbucks/Dunkin' Donuts coffee.
    Thank you Officer, I really needed that ticket.
    Why I love my last name.



    Monday, Oct. 19: M.O. Students will be able to write an essay using sarcasm on one of 14 topics.

    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    The Iron Heel vocabulary activity on Quia.
    Write the essay. Type the topic at the top of the page.
    Read chapter VIII of The Iron Heel and do the definitions.

    Tuesday, Oct. 20: M.O. Students will be able to revise an essay using sarcasm.

    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    Discussion re sarcasm and "over the top" comments.
    Revision
    Begin reading chapter IX of The Iron Heel and do the definitions. (pages 77-81)

    Wednesday, Oct. 21: M.O. Students will be able to share their essays using sarcasm and critique for "humorous" sarcasm.

    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    Share sarcasm essays with small group. Choose the best one.
    Read the best essays to class.
    Read in pairs starting on page 82, chapter IX (9) of The Iron Heel. Do the vocabulary as you come to it.
    Finish Chapter IX for homework. Practice the novel's vocabulary at home.

    Thursday, Oct. 22: M.O. Students will be able to choose 12 vocabulary words from chapters VIII -IX (8-9) and write a sentence definition for Quia in small groups for the following week's quiz.

    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    Small group work to choose 12 vocabulary words.
    Create a sentence with them for the quiz.
    Read in pairs starting on page 89, chapter X (10) of The Iron Heel. Do the vocabulary as you come to it.
    Finish for homework. Practice the novel's vocabulary at home.

    Friday, Oct. 23: M.O. Students will be able to read the short story "The Shawl" by Cynthia Ozick and evaluate the setting and character.

    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    Read the short story
    1. Underline anything that helps give the reader a picture of the setting.
    2. Circle anything that helps give the reader a picture of the main characters.
    3. Now complete in pairs the five questions.
    HmWk: Read Chapter X (10) of The Iron Heel and complete the definitions.


    Monday, Oct. 26: M.O. Students will be able to analyze the short story "The Shawl" by Cynthia Ozick and evaluate the setting and characters.
    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    List the three main characters in "The Shawl." Describe them from your notes. See what you circled.
    List everything that tells you about the setting. Again, refer to what you underlined.
    Share with two peers and add to your lists.
    Class discussion about how the setting and characters elucidate the theme.
    Write the first two paragraphs to this prompt: How does the setting of the short story "The Shawl" accentuate the characters? Make sure your thesis covers the prompt fully.

    Tuesday, Oct. 27: M.O. Students will be able to read chapter 11 of The Iron Heel and define the bold, underlined vocabulary words.
    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    Quia Vocabulary for the week.
    Discuss vocabulary, then read orally "The Iron Heel Define vocabulary.

    Wednesday, Oct. 28: M.O. Students will be able to identify and create the appropriate paragraph structure and punctuation for dialogue.
    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    Practice Vocabulary Quiz activity on Quia.
    Dialogue worksheet. In pairs read the dialogue worksheet to each other. Then complete the back page individually for Part One and in pairs for Part Two. Type up the conversation. Be sure to use proper paragraph structure and punctuation. Then print it.
    Once done, share your "conversation" with another pair of students. Have them check to make sure your paragraph structure and punctuation is correct. They should sign their name to your paper to show they checked it. If there's something wrong, go back and fix it! :-) Turn the original conversation and the retyped conversation in when you think it's complete! If time, define words for The Iron Heel for chapter XII (12).

    Thursday, Oct. 29: M.O. Students will be able to read chapter 12 of The Iron Heel and understand the bold, underlined vocabulary words.
    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    Quia vocabulary practice.
    Read Chapter 12 orally in small groups of 4-5.
    Discuss definitions as needed.
    Describe briefly what happened to Bishop Morehouse. *Complete for homework if not enough time in class.
    *HmWk: Study for vocabulary quiz.

    Friday, Oct. 30: M.O. Students will be able to take a vocabulary quiz with at least 70% accuracy.
    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    Vocabulary review
    Vocabulary Quiz.
    Scary stories for Halloweeen. Students will be able to identify the setting and main characters in each story.


    Monday-Tuesday, Nov. 2-3: M.O. Students will be able to choose 12 words from chapters 12-13 in London's The Iron Heel and create a sentence with each that someone could figure out what the word was if it was left out.
    Agenda:

    Warm-up: Paired work - choose 12 words
    Defiition check for the novel.
    Write 12 sentences. Discussion of which words to use for Friday's quiz.
    Define the words and discuss enunciation and make connections. Finish dual sentences.
    Put up one sentence per couple per word on your list onto easel paper.

    Wednesday-Thursday, Nov. 4-5: M.O. Students will be able to read orally London's The Iron Heel and take parts, while taking notes in the margins.
    Agenda:

    Warm-up: Quia vocabulary matching (Wed. and Thursday)
    Answer the following questions about Chapter XIII (13):
    1. What was the "general strike" about? What groups were involved?
    2. Why did America and Germany want to go to war against each other?
    3. Do you think the general populace could have managed this after the bombing of Peral Harbor?
    4. Who were the "strongest promoters" of the strike?
    5. How long did the strike last?
    6. How was Germany eventually broken?
    Read The Iron Heel orally. Students take parts.
    Wed. HmWk: Define vocabulary through chapter XV (15)

    Friday, Nov. 6: M.O. Students will be able to take a vocabulary quiz with at least 70% accuracy.
    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    Vocabulary review
    Vocabulary Quiz.
    Paired Poetry: "The Passionate Shepherd to His Love" by Christopher Marlowe and "The Nymph's Reply to the Shepherd" by Sir Walter Raleigh.
    Underline everything the passionate shepherd will give to the Nymph and circle everything the nymph says she will actually get.
    The boys will write a reply to the nymph and the girls will write a reply to the boys using at least four stanzas and an "aa, bb, cc, dd, ee, ff, gg, hh" rhyme pattern in eight syllables per line.
    NOTE: English poetry employs five basic rhythms of varying stressed and unstressed syllables. What is the stress pattern in both poems?
    Students may use rhymezone.com for help.


    Monday-Tuesday, Nov. 9-10: M.O. Students will be able to summarize chapters 14-16 of The Iron Heel through paired partnering and answering questions.
    Agenda:
    Warm-up:
    Choose 12 words from Chapters 14-15 for the vocabulary quiz on Friday. Write the definition and a sentence to go along with it, including the definition in a sentence frame.
    Summarize the chapter with a partner.
    Read orally parts of each chapter as a large group.

    Answer the following questions for Chapter 15.
    1. What was the truth about the wages and hours for the railroad employees, the iron and steel workers, the engineers, and the machinists?
    2. What was the slogan of the strong unions?
    3. What happened to the members in the "favored unions"? Why?
    4. Who captured the world market? What happened in other countries at the same time?

    Answer the following questions from Chapter 16:
    1. Why didn't Avis's father have to work?
    2. Describe the conversation between Mr. Wickson and the Professor.
    3. Why weren't the elected Grangers permitted to take office?
    4. Why were there riots?
    5. What happened to the people rioting?
    6.How many miners went out on strike at the same time the Grangers wee revolting? Why? What happened to the miners?
    7. What did Ernest calculate was the average life of a comrade who joined the "Fighting Groups"?
    8. What were the three tasks Avis and Ernest set for themselves?
    9. The "shrine of the Revolution" was also the shrine of _____________.

    Thursday, Nov. 12: M.O. Students will be able to summarize chapters 17-18 of The Iron Heel through paired partnering and answering questions.
    Warm-up:
    Practice vocabulary.
    Answer the following questions for Chapter XVII (17)
    1. What was the "unemployed bill"? Who was it for and what happened to it and the people it was to help?
    2. On page 134, Ernest becomes very angry with the Republicans and Democrats. Why? What does he call them?
    3. Where does Ernest want to send all the people in the chamber yelling at him?
    4. What happened to Ernest? Then what happened to Avis? Why?
    5. Who wore the "scarlet livery"? What do you think it stood for?
    6. Who was Pervaise? Why did he do what he did? How was he rewarded?
    7. Read the final quote on page 138. What does this mean?

    Answer the following questions for Chapter XVIII (18).
    1. How long was Avis in prison?
    2. On page 139, paragraph 3, it states, "Fifty-two Congressman were in prison, and fully three hundred more of our leaders. It was planned that they should be delivered simultaneously." What does this quote mean?
    3. How did Avis escape? What was her plan?
    4. Who was Anna Roylston?
    5. Where did Avis go after her escape?
    6. Describe John Carlson, who was a humble figure in the Revolution.
    7. What did Avis live in? Why the increments?

    Friday, Nov. 13: M.O. Students will be able to take a vocabulary quiz with at least 70% accuracy and summarize chapter 19 of The Iron Heel through paired partnering and answering questions.
    Warm-up:
    Vocabulary for quiz on Friday.
    Quiz for chapters 14-15.

    Answer the following questions for Chapter XIX (19).
    1. Ernest tells Avis to not only become another woman, but to make herself over completely. Why is this important? How does Avis do this?
    2. What happened to Avis' father, John Cunningham?
    3. How long did Avis spend in the refuge by herself? Who broke that loneliness?
    4. Who trailed them? What happened to the man?
    5. How did Avis again meet Peter Donnelly? What had happeend to him? What happened to him later?
    6. What happened to Colonel Ingram? Why did Avis work with him?
    7. What happened to Colonel Van Gilbert? How was Avis involved in his final trial?
    8. What happened to Joseph Hurd? Why did this meeting affect Avis?
    HmWk: Do chapters 20-21 for homework. Define the vocabulary, read the chapters, and answer the following questions.
    Answer the following questions for Chapter XX (20).
    1. When did the wholesale jail delivery occur? What does this mean?
    2. Why was Avis happy for the next eighteen months?
    3. Describe Ernest and Avis's reunion. Describe how Ernest looked.
    4. What trick did Avis play on Ernest? Why was it necessary?
    5. What did Ernest and Avis do for the next eighteen months?
    6. Who was Philip Wickson and what happened to him?

    Answer the following questions for Chapter XXI (21).
    1. Who were the Mercenaries?

    2. What change happened to the oligarchs? Describe their beliefs.
    3. What was the "great driving force" of the oligarchs?
    4. How was the discontent "lulled" by the oligarch?
    5. What is Asgard? Who built it?
    6. When did Avis and Ernest leave the refuge? Who did they become? Why?


    Monday, Nov. 16: M.O. Students will be able to read chapter XXII of The Iron Heel in small groups then by taking parts.
    Warm-up:
    Turn in chapters XX-XXI (20-21) homework.
    From the entire novel, students will create a matching word/definition list of at least 15 words for the final on Friday.
    Begin Chapter XXII (22). Read orally to each other in groups of three: pages 161-163. One person reads, the next looks up the underlined vocabulary word, the third makes a flashcard for the word. The defintion goes on the back. Swap off every half page.
    Group read beginning on page 163 with the dialogue. Students take parts: Avis, Galvin (surgeon-in-chief), Hartman, and maid.
    Answer the following questions for homework:
    1. Why was the First Revolt doomed to failure?
    2. How did the Iron Heel learn of the revolt?
    3. Where did the Iron Heel decide to teach its lesson to the revolutionaries? Why?
    4. Who are the people of the abyss? What did the Iron Heel want them to do? Why?
    5. In the second paragraph on the page it states, "The explosion was ready for the flash of powder,...". What does this mean?
    6. Why was it important that Avis go to the Emergency Hospital before catching the train?
    7. Why are Avis and Hartman considered double agents or agents-provocateurs?
    8. Why is the young mulatto woman on the train upset?
    9. What happened when Avis and Hartman arrived in the city?
    10. How were Avis and Hartman able to walk through the city without being stopped or killed?

    Tuesday, Nov. 17: M.O. Students will be able to read chapter XXIII of The Iron Heel in small groups by taking characters' parts.
    Warm-up:
    Turn in the questions from Chapter XXII (22). Look up the definitions for Chapter XXIII (23) with a partner.
    Read in groups of three pages 170-171. Teacher reads description, dialogue read by students (pages 172-178).
    HmWk: Define the vocabulary for chapters XXIV -XXV (24-25), then read them for homework. Write a one page explanation of the last two chapters, which includes your opinion about how the novel ends.

    Wednesday, Nov. 18: M.O. Students will be able to create test questions/answers for The Iron Heel with a partner.
    Warm-up:
    Turn in homework. Create ten multple choice and fill-in-the-blank test questions/answers with a partner. Create one matching vocabulary question with at least ten words. Create one matching character questions with at least six characters. Turn in before class is over.
    HmWk: Review the novel. Read anything you missed.

    Thusday, Nov. 19: M.O. Students will be able to review and study for The Iron Heel in small groups by taking parts.
    Warm-up:
    Handouts of student prepared test questions. Individual Review.
    With a partner, students will quiz each other on the questions.
    At the end of the class, the teacher wil quiz the three student teams.
    HmWk: Study for The Iron Heel final.

    Friday, Nov. 20: M.O. Students will be able to take a final on The Iron Heel with at least 70% accuracy.
    Warm-up:
    Q and A
    Online final.
    HmWk: Read the pages prior to and after Shakespeare's play, Macbeth in the packet closely, which means underlining important parts, using question marks to note places that need clarity, and jotting notes down about what you read if you think of something that relates to the reading.


    Monday-Tuesday, Nov. 23-24: M.O. Students will be able to read Shakespeare's play Macbeth and draw six scenes that depict the play.
    Warm-up Monday:
    Look at the picture of the Globe and list five things you learned from the reading.
    Discussion of close reading.
    Begin reading the play (pages 10-30). Highlight unusual words, words that Shakespeare used then or words you aren't sure of the meaning. Underline important quotes discussed in class.
    Class discussion of the possible scenes that could be drawn to depict the play.
    Monday HMWK: Draw the first three scenes you want to use for the play. Be sure to include a specific quote that will enhance each picture.
    Warm-up Tuesday: Share the three scenes you drew with a peer. Explain why you chose those three scenes.
    Continue reading the play (pages 30-48).
    Discuss what scenes would be good to finish the play with.
    Draw the scenes. Be sure to include a specific quote that will enhance each picture.
    Turn in.
    Hmwk: List the words you highlighted as we read the play. Define them based on Shakespeare's definitions and the class discussions. Due on Monday.


    Monday- Nov. 30: M.O. Students will be able to interpret specific quotes from Shakespeare's play Macbeth by rewriting them in modern day English.
    AGENDA: Warm-up Monday:
    Summarize the play in ten sentences or less.
    With a partner, type up the quotes that were discussed in class and rewrite them using today's language.
    Share your definitions for the vocabulary with a partner. Add your partner's to your own list.
    Class discussion of vocabualry and quotes.
    Test on Tuesday.
    HmWk: Study!

    Tuesday- Dec. 1: M.O. Students will be able to take an online test on Shakespeare's play Macbeth and earn at least a 70%.
    AGENDA: Warm-up:
    Review Vocabulary.
    Test on Macbeth.

    Wednesday- Dec. 2: M.O. Students will be able to review skills to prepare for a final English Post-test on Thursday.
    AGENDA: Warm-up:
    Questions and answers re review.
    Review for test using partners and easel paper.

    Thursday- Dec. 3: M.O. Students will be able to take a final English Post-test to improve their pre-test score.
    AGENDA:
    Post-test

    Friday- Dec. 4: M.O. Students will be able to review their final English Post-test comparing it to their pre-test.
    AGENDA:

    Give back finals and compare to pre-test.


































































































    Stop***Arret***Stop***Stoppen***Stop***Stop***
    DO NOT READ BEYOND THIS POINT***
    Stop***Stop***Parar***Stop***Alto***Stop***











































































































    Journal entry #3: Where will you be one year from now?

    Friday, Sept. 3: M.O. Students will be able to differentiate similes and metaphors by compiling a list from the Internet along with a definition. Each student will then share with a partner.
    AGENDA:
    SSR (set up logs), Vocabulary intro., metaphor/simile small group work (Type I),

    Definitions: metaphor - a comparison between essentially unlike things without a word such as "like" or "as." Ex: "My love is a red, red rose."
    simile - A figure of speech involving a comparison between unlike things using "like" or "as" or "as though." Ex: "My love is like a red, red rose."
    Add these definitions to your notebook under the section marked "Literary Terminology." Homework:
    Start thinking about a topic for your college essay.
    Create a metaphor/simile worksheet for your partner (definition + one example for each)
    Extra Homework: find three poems with at least one simile and one metaphor in each (underline them), or create a silly one yourself with at least five combined similes and metaphors. Be prepared to share with the class on Friday. You may use rhymezone.com for additional help. Read chapters 5-6 for Friday in Beowulf.


    Tuesday, Sept. 7: M.O. Students will be able to use the Internet to find information about Beowulf, then share with their peers.
    AGENDA:
    Vocabulary with a partner. Assign textbook and Beowulf. Mini-lesson on English background. Beowulf search time, small group sharing re similes and metaphors.
    Beowulf (small groups), Journal time: describe Grendel in Beowulf (Journal #2). Be sure to have completed Vocabulary entries!
    Read introduction to Beowulf in the textbook on pages 1-12. Write a detailed description of the main character in Beowulf with page and line citations from the book to back up your comments. A list of "fun" information about Beowulf discovered in the small groups.
    Homework Begin reading pages 1-17 in Beowulf.
    Finish for homework. Complete a description of Beowulf through a hand-drawn picture or Internet picture of him in battle with Grendel or of the battle at hall Heorot.

    Wednesday, Sept. 8: M.O. Students will be able to describe Beowulf, through an exploration of pictures shared with peers.
    Agenda:
    Vocabulary, share homework, in small groups chose a Golden Nugget for each chapter read and share with entire group, read Chapter IV orally. Read Chapter V orally to a partner. Homework: Read Chapter VI through page 42.

    Thursday, Sept. 9: M.O. Students will be able to identify with a partner at least one Golden Nugget for each chapter read and be able to explain the significance of their choice.
    Agenda:
    Vocabulary, share homework (pictures), in small groups chose a Golden Nugget for each chapter read and share with entire group, read Chapter VII orally. Read Chapter VIII orally to a partner. Homework: Read Chapter IX. Draw a picture of the Fire Dragon or of the treasures in the den. Friday, Sept. 10: M.O. Students will be able to write a detailed description of Beowulf before he became King in a Type II using their notes, research, and readings.

    Agenda:
    Vocabulary, share homework (pictures), in small groups chose a Golden Nugget for each chapter read and share with entire group, read Chapter X orally. Read Chapter XI orally to a partner. Complete a description of Beowulf with your partner. Homework: Read Chapter XII (through page 81).


    Monday, Sept. 13: M.O. Students will be able to write a description of Beowulf, Grendel, Grendel's mother, the Fire Dragon, and King Hrothgar and Queen Wealhtheow from their notes and class pictures.
    Agenda:
    Vocabulary, in small groups write a description of Beowulf, Grendel, Grendel's mother, the Fire Dragon, and King Hrothgar and Queen Wealhtheow; read Chapter XIII-XIV orally to a partner. Read Chapter XV-XVI orally. Complete an acrostic for Beowulf that involves the plot of the story.
    1) Explain the "blocks." 2) Who killed Hardred? 3) Why did Beowulf become king? 4) Describe the Firedrake? 5) In bullet fashion, tell what happened in the battle between the Firedrake and Beowulf. Homework: Go back over your post-its and notes. Draw a picture of King Beowulf's final exploit. Describe his final resting place. Answer these questions for Tues. 1) What did Beowulf's collar absorb? 2) What happened to Beowulf's blade? 3)What killed Grendel according to Beowulf? 4)Describe the story told by the poets of the Fire Dragon. 5) How did Beowulf kill Grendel's mother? 6) Why did Beowulf kill Grendel twice? How did he do it the second time? 7) What was wrong with Beowulf after he returned from killing Grendel and his mother? How was he cured? 8) What did Beowulf do with his sword before he sailed home? Who did he give it to and why? 9) What did Beowulf do as soon as he arrived home? 10) What did Beowulf do with all his gifts? Which one did he keep? 11) How did Beowulf become king?(Be sure to have finished reading the book for Tuesday.)


    Tuesday, Sept. 14: M.O. Students will be able to take a test on Beowulf with 70% accuracy.
    AGENDA:
    Vocab, Beowulf test. College acceptance essay examples.
    Homework: Choose three topics to write a college essay on and write them down. Support each idea with three examples. Before you begin, check the college you want to attend and see if they have a specific prompt. Be sure your topics work with any prompt requested. Remember, this is your chance to write about something you care about and know well. This is your virtual handshake!


    Wednesday, Sept. 15: M.O. Students will be able to write the first paragraph, including a topic sentence, of their college essay.
    AGENDA:
    Vocab, Review Beowulf test.
    Mini-lesson on Topic sentence.
    Discussion re college essay topics (A sentence, sometimes at the beginning of a paragraph, that states or suggests the main idea of a passage.) Go to and explain how V.S. Pritchett's topic sentence works with the essay following.
    [("London is prolific in its casualties, its human waste and eccentrics."]
    Begin in large group and then complete in small groups. Choose the final topic to write a college essay on. Begin formulating a topic sentence.
    Homework: Write the opening paragraph of your essay incorporating your topic sentence. Due Thursday.



    Stop***Stop***Stop***Stop***Stop***Stop***Stop***Stop***
    _______________________________________________________





    Important Dates

    Week I
      Supplies needed for class by Tuesday: 2 inch 3-ring binder, college ruled paper, separators, post-its (various sizes), journal, pen, USB drive (1 gig or more). The syllabus and textbook (please cover ASAP) will be passed out and discussed during this first week of school.
      The Summer Reading test will be given on Friday. This equals 5% of your grade for the quarter. Be sure to review the books you read.
      Introduction to class on Thursday, textbooks issued on Tuesday (acquaint yourself with the book).


      JOURNALS: You will be required to keep a Journal, which should be saved to your school file on the computer. It can be a combination of handwritten and computer generated. Date every Journal entry. "Journal item #1: your choice from my Writing Journal site;
      Journal item #2: List what you expect to learn in Eng. IV; list what you want to learn in Eng IV, and list what you think you should know when you finish the class to prepare you for college. Don't forget to date this.


      Three topics for your first essay, the "proverbial" college essay (if already written, choose another topic), will be chosen by Friday. Try researching college topics online before you make a choice. Also check with the schools you are interested in attending and see if they have a specific question/s that you must write an essay on. Print out a hard copy of any college's essay topics and bring it/them in. Find a topic you are passionate about.
      Think about one or two of the following:
      A) Drawing on your own experiences and observations, use examples to show that you agree or disagree with any one of the following principles:
      1. In a hierarchy every employee tends to rise to his level of incompetence. (The Peter Principle)
      2. Work expands to fill the time available. (Parkinson's Law)
      3. Whatever can go wrong, will go wrong. (Murphy's Law)
      4. You’ll never go broke underestimating the intelligence of the American public. (Barnum's Law)
      B. Drawing on your own experiences and observations, use examples to show that you agree or disagree with any one of the following proverbs and observations:
      5. "Adults are merely obsolete children." (Dr. Seuss)
      6. Anticipation is often greater than realization.>br> 7. "You don't know what you've got till it's gone." (Joni Mitchell)
      8. A friend walks in when everyone else walks out.
      9. "Punctuality is the virtue of the bored." (Evelyn Waugh)
      10. When life throws you lemons, make lemonade.
      11. "When everything is coming your way, you're in the wrong lane." (Steven Wright)

      Please bring in Friday (Sept. 17): 1. your all-time favorite song (on CD or the words), 2. a favorite picture or photo (jpg) and 3. a list of at least five colleges or places of employment and their web sites, which you might like to attend, have already applied to, or would like to work for. Collage Time! (Using WordArt and Word, rewrite the lyrics, add your picture, your college choices, and create an attractive collage that tells something about you. Be ready to share and explain to the rest of the class.

    Additional Assignments:
    Database: An example/template will be handed out. Read and follow the instructions. Make a file and put it in your own folder.
    (Note: a file is a single item and goes into a folder, which holds many items usually dealing with one topic. Please ask if you're not sure how to use the computer system. Better to be safe than sorry!)

    Writing Journal: Choose two writing journal topics from the online list or through "This I Believe" every week (http://www.quia.com/pages/writingjournal.html) and write at least half a page for each. Don't forget to write which Journal entries they are and date them. You may type this in a Word document if you prefer or use a written journal, but it all will need to be turned in when graded.(Extra credit: if you bring in a writing journal item and I include it on this site...you receive extra credit added to your homework grade.) I will also give you prompts in class, which will be added to your Journal. Again, don't forget to date each entry. Aso be sure to write down the prompt at the top of your response.

    Essay Writing There will be class essays and department essays periodically. Collins writing (AHS Writing Program) will be used in all writing assignments. Be familiar with Type I (generate and capture ideas), Type II (content understanding checkoff), Type III (FCAs included for feedback), Type IV (Peer editing), and Type V (publishable material) writing. Essays will be mostly Type 3 and Type 4.

    Vocabulary: You and a partner will choose three words each from the box and follow the directions. Approximately every two weeks, I will ask for this work. Vocabulary quizzes incorporating these words will be given weekly online. It is important that you study for the quizzes. I have set up each set of words with games, which can be played to help you learn the words. Print out a copy of the vocabulary and the definitions each week. Please reformat and make sure that this equals only one page before you print it, or print it at home. Thank you for your help conserving paper and ink.
    Links to the vocabulary on the quizzes are available from this web site. The first fifteen minutes of class will be devoted to Journaling and vocabulary. Check the easel to see which one will be completed each day.


    _______________________________________________________



    DAY 1 Sept. 2

    Thursday: Mastery Objective (MO) Students will understand what is expected of them during the course of English IV by taking notes on their syllabus, beginning their Journal, and setting up their own computer folders along with their vocabulary account on Quia.

    AGENDA: Syllabus, Introduction to computer lab, Quia Web sites, Vocabulary introduction and account set up.
    Journal entry #1: Choose one entry from my Writing Journal site and respond to it.

    Journal entry #2: Where will you be one year from now?

    Summer Reading Test on Friday
    Bring flash drive by Tuesday and 3-ring notebook. Try not to lose it. Always back up everything at least twice! Save everything on your school "space."


    Friday, Sept. 3: M.O. Students will be able to differentiate similes and metaphors by compiling a list from the Internet along with a definition. Each student will then share with a partner.
    AGENDA:
    SSR (set up logs), Vocabulary intro., metaphor/simile small group work (Type I),

    Definitions: metaphor - a comparison between essentially unlike things without a word such as "like" or "as." Ex: "My love is a red, red rose."
    simile - A figure of speech involving a comparison between unlike things using "like" or "as" or "as though." Ex: "My love is like a red, red rose."
    Add these definitions to your notebook under the section marked "Literary Terminology." Homework:
    Start thinking about a topic for your college essay.
    Create a metaphor/simile worksheet for your partner (definition + one example for each)
    Extra Homework: find three poems with at least one simile and one metaphor in each (underline them), or create a silly one yourself with at least five combined similes and metaphors. Be prepared to share with the class on Friday. You may use rhymezone.com for additional help. Read chapters 5-6 for Friday in Beowulf.


    Tuesday, Sept. 7: M.O. Students will be able to use the Internet to find information about Beowulf, then share with their peers.
    AGENDA:
    Vocabulary with a partner. Assign textbook and Beowulf. Mini-lesson on English background. Beowulf search time, small group sharing re similes and metaphors.
    Beowulf (small groups), Journal time: describe Grendel in Beowulf (Journal #2). Be sure to have completed Vocabulary entries!
    Read introduction to Beowulf in the textbook on pages 1-12. Write a detailed description of the main character in Beowulf with page and line citations from the book to back up your comments. A list of "fun" information about Beowulf discovered in the small groups.
    Homework Begin reading pages 1-17 in Beowulf.
    Finish for homework. Complete a description of Beowulf through a hand-drawn picture or Internet picture of him in battle with Grendel or of the battle at hall Heorot.

    Wednesday, Sept. 8: M.O. Students will be able to describe Beowulf, through an exploration of pictures shared with peers.
    Agenda:
    Vocabulary, share homework, in small groups chose a Golden Nugget for each chapter read and share with entire group, read Chapter IV orally. Read Chapter V orally to a partner. Homework: Read Chapter VI through page 42.

    Thursday, Sept. 9: M.O. Students will be able to identify with a partner at least one Golden Nugget for each chapter read and be able to explain the significance of their choice.
    Agenda:
    Vocabulary, share homework (pictures), in small groups chose a Golden Nugget for each chapter read and share with entire group, read Chapter VII orally. Read Chapter VIII orally to a partner. Homework: Read Chapter IX. Draw a picture of the Fire Dragon or of the treasures in the den. Friday, Sept. 10: M.O. Students will be able to write a detailed description of Beowulf before he became King in a Type II using their notes, research, and readings.

    Agenda:
    Vocabulary, share homework (pictures), in small groups chose a Golden Nugget for each chapter read and share with entire group, read Chapter X orally. Read Chapter XI orally to a partner. Complete a description of Beowulf with your partner. Homework: Read Chapter XII (through page 81).


    Monday, Sept. 13: M.O. Students will be able to write a description of Beowulf, Grendel, Grendel's mother, the Fire Dragon, and King Hrothgar and Queen Wealhtheow from their notes and class pictures.
    Agenda:
    Vocabulary, in small groups write a description of Beowulf, Grendel, Grendel's mother, the Fire Dragon, and King Hrothgar and Queen Wealhtheow; read Chapter XIII-XIV orally to a partner. Read Chapter XV-XVI orally. Complete an acrostic for Beowulf that involves the plot of the story.
    1) Explain the "blocks." 2) Who killed Hardred? 3) Why did Beowulf become king? 4) Describe the Firedrake? 5) In bullet fashion, tell what happened in the battle between the Firedrake and Beowulf. Homework: Go back over your post-its and notes. Draw a picture of King Beowulf's final exploit. Describe his final resting place. Answer these questions for Tues. 1) What did Beowulf's collar absorb? 2) What happened to Beowulf's blade? 3)What killed Grendel according to Beowulf? 4)Describe the story told by the poets of the Fire Dragon. 5) How did Beowulf kill Grendel's mother? 6) Why did Beowulf kill Grendel twice? How did he do it the second time? 7) What was wrong with Beowulf after he returned from killing Grendel and his mother? How was he cured? 8) What did Beowulf do with his sword before he sailed home? Who did he give it to and why? 9) What did Beowulf do as soon as he arrived home? 10) What did Beowulf do with all his gifts? Which one did he keep? 11) How did Beowulf become king?(Be sure to have finished reading the book for Tuesday.)


    Tuesday, Sept. 14: M.O. Students will be able to take a test on Beowulf with 70% accuracy.
    AGENDA:
    Vocab, Beowulf test. College acceptance essay examples.
    Homework: Choose three topics to write a college essay on and write them down. Support each idea with three examples. Before you begin, check the college you want to attend and see if they have a specific prompt. Be sure your topics work with any prompt requested. Remember, this is your chance to write about something you care about and know well. This is your virtual handshake!


    Wednesday, Sept. 15: M.O. Students will be able to write the first paragraph, including a topic sentence, of their college essay.
    AGENDA:
    Vocab, Review Beowulf test.
    Mini-lesson on Topic sentence.
    Discussion re college essay topics (A sentence, sometimes at the beginning of a paragraph, that states or suggests the main idea of a passage.) Go to and explain how V.S. Pritchett's topic sentence works with the essay following.
    [("London is prolific in its casualties, its human waste and eccentrics."]
    Begin in large group and then complete in small groups. Choose the final topic to write a college essay on. Begin formulating a topic sentence.
    Homework: Write the opening paragraph of your essay incorporating your topic sentence. Due Thursday.


    Thursday, Sept. 16: M.O. Students will take a department pre-test in order to monitor student growth.
    AGENDA:
    Turn in homework. Vocab, Pre-test; Compile and create a collage using information about themselves in order to share hobbies and goals. Collage work time, Share if time.

    Homework: Journal writing: Be sure to have completed 4 Journal wiritngs. #1 and #3 from the Writing Journal web site. #2 "Where do you see yourself in seven years?" #4 Tell me what you liked about Beowulf the character and then Beowulf the book.


    Friday, Sept. 17: M.O. SWBAT access class vocabulary and understand how to monitor their own progress by filling out a 3x5 card and beginning Kaplan SAT I.
    AGENDA:
    Vocab, collage sharing, Vocabulary for Monday, Journal check. Homework: Rewrite your opening college essay paragraph.

    Monday, Sept. 20: M.O. SWBAT brainstorm and list the qualities needed in a college essay, then rewrite their first paragraph.
    AGENDA:
    Vocab time - Princeton Review Vocab Quiz Part A, (/Journal, college essay brainstorming, list on easel of qualities admissions' officers are looking for in a good essay. List of "must haves" in first paragraph. Rewrite the first paragraph.
    Homework Edit the first paragraph of your college essay, type it and bring in a hard copy for Wed. Study for Vocab Quiz Princeton Review Vcab Quiz Part A for Thursday using the Web site games.



    Tuesday, Sept. 21: M.O. SWBAT point out the specific rhythm of Anglo Saxon poetry using beats.
    AGENDA:
    Vocab time - Princeton Review Vocab Quiz Part A - play games;
    Read page 30 under Literary Elements. Copy five lines from Beowulf onto your paper and count the "beats."
    Answer the last sentence in this section re "kennings." (4 items: "the whale-road," the sea-pahts," "God's bright beacon," and "Heaven's high arch."
    Read pages 32 - 34. Answer five questions under "Reading Check" on page 34.
    Do the Focus on Narrative Writing but simply bullet the sequence of events. Explain how you might use the transitional words such as: when, suddenly, then, immediately, or soon.
    Turn in your work.
    Hmwk:Whatever you did not complete is homework. Vocab Quiz on Thursday.


    Wednesday, Sept. 22: M.O. SWBAT write the second paragraph of their college essay after discussing paragraph structure and becoming familiar with essay formula.
    AGENDA:
    Study for Vocab quiz Princeton Review IA (quiz tomorrow), go over Tuesday's classwork pages 30-34 in textbook, brainstorm second paragraph ideas and structure. Independent essay writing, peer editing.
    Homework Continue editing the second paragraph of your college essay, type it and bring in a hard copy and your "file" copy for Thursday. Study for Princeton Review Vocab. quiz 1A.


    Thursday, Sept. 23: M.O. SWBAT write the third paragraph of the college essay after teacher feedback.
    AGENDA:
    Vocab quiz Princeton Review IA, Orally read "The Seafarer" on pages 35-38. Discuss imagery; Independent writing re college essay, peer editing.
    Homework: Rewrite third paragraph for Friday; Read pages 39-40. Solve the riddles.


    Friday, Sept. 24: M.O. SWBAT write the fourth paragraph of the college essay after teacher feedback.
    AGENDA:
    Journal: "List three things you want to do with your life and explain why." Independent essay writing, peer editing.
    Homework: Write the conclusion to your essay. Bring in a finished essay on Monday, both in hard copy typed and on your flashdrive. Princeton review Part 1B for Thursday.


    Monday, Sept. 27: M.O. SWBAT write the third paragraph of the college essay after teacher feedback.
    AGENDA:
    Vocab quiz Princeton Review IB, Orally read "The Seafarer" on pages 35-38. Discuss imagery; Independent writing re college essay, peer editing.
    Homework: Rewrite third/fourth paragraph/s; Read pages 39-40. Solve the riddles.
    . Study for Vocab Quiz Princeton Review Vcab Quiz Part B for Thursday using the Web site games.



    Tuesday, Sept. 28: M.O. SWBAT write the fourth paragraph of the college essay after teacher feedback.
    AGENDA:
    Journal: "List three things you want to do with your life and explain why." Independent essay writing, peer editing. Independent writing. Go over homework.
    Homework: Write the conclusion to your essay. Bring in a finished essay on Wednesday, both in hard copy typed and on your flashdrive. Princeton review Part 1B for Thursday.


    Wednesday, Sept. 29: M.O. SWBAT peer edit their peers' finished essays using a class generated list of items to look for.
    AGENDA:
    Study for Vocab quiz Princeton Review IB (quiz tomorrow), peer editing; time to edit/add/delete.
    Homework Final copy of the college essay due on Friday. All copies should be stapled togther with the most recent copy on top. Study for Princeton Review Vocab. quiz 1B.


    Thursday, Sept. 30: M.O. SWBAT take a vocabulary quiz with at least 70% accuracy.
    AGENDA:
    Vocab quiz Princeton Review IB, Read pages 41-54. Do question #1 on pg. 42, summarize each of the 11 headings from pages 43-54, and answer questions 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9.
    Homework: finish classwork for homework.


    Friday, Oct. 1: M.O. Students will be able to translate one Canterbury Tale in a Type II.
    AGENDA:
    Vocabulary and journal time. Final peer edit of college essay. Due today!
    Introduction to Canterbury Tales, Read Canterbury Tales from textbook. Research re one tale.
    Do: Read pages 55-56 on Chaucer and "The Prologue to the Canterbury Tales" on pages 57-59. Note that pages 58 and 59 are the same thing, only translated. Highlight the main points on sticky note/s. Then read the "Focus on Narrative Writing" on page 80 and actually write a description (character traits) of a special family member. Remember to show not tell.

    .
    Homework: Write the conclusion to your essay. Bring in a finished essay on Monday, both in hard copy typed and on your flashdrive. Princeton review Part 1B for Thursday.


    Monday, Oct. 4: M.O. SWBAT take a vocabulary quiz with at least 70% accuracy.
    AGENDA:
    Vocab quiz Princeton Review IB, Read pages 41-54. Do question #1 on pg. 42, summarize each of the 11 headings from pages 43-54, and answer questions 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9.
    Homework: finish classwork for homework.

    Tuesday, Oct. 5: M.O. SWBAT peer edit their peers' finished essays using a class generated list of items to look for.
    AGENDA:
    Study for Vocab quiz Princeton Review IC (quiz Thursday), peer editing; time to edit/add/delete.
    Homework Final copy of the college essay due on Wednesday. All copies should be stapled togther with the most recent copy on top. Study for Princeton Review Vocab. quiz 1C.


    Wednesday, Oct. 6: M.O. Students will be able to translate one Canterbury Tale in a Type II.
    AGENDA:
    Vocabulary and journal time. Final college essay due today!
    Introduction to Canterbury Tales, Read Canterbury Tales from textbook. Research re one tale.
    Do: Read pages 55-56 on Chaucer and "The Prologue to the Canterbury Tales" on pages 57-59. Note that pages 58 and 59 are the same thing, only translated. Highlight the main points on sticky note/s. Then read the "Focus on Narrative Writing" on page 80 and actually write a description (character traits) of a special family member. Remember to show not tell.

    .
    Homework: Write the conclusion to your essay. Bring in a finished essay on Monday, both in hard copy typed and on your flashdrive. Princeton review Part 1B for Thursday.

    Thursday, Oct. 7: M.O. SWBAT take a vocabulary quiz with at least 70% accuracy.
    AGENDA:
    Vocab quiz Princeton Review IC, Read one tale in Canterbury Tales. Summarize the tale, include a Golden Nugget with an explanation as to why it was chosen, and define five words you did not know when you began reding the tale.
    Homework: finish classwork for homework.

    Friday, Oct. 8: M.O. Students will be able to take notes on "The Wife of Bath's Tale" and be able to state the moral of the story, the plot, and describe the characters in a Type II.
    AGENDA:
    Vocabulary and journal time. Final peer edit of college essay. Due today! Every day late equals ten points off.


    Tuesday, Oct. 12: M.O. SWBAT share their character with their peers during an oral presentation.
    AGENDA:
    Study for Vocab quiz Princeton Review ID (quiz Thursday), Canterbury Tale character sharing.
    Homework Study for Princeton Review Vocab. quiz 1C. Rewrite your Canterbury Tale charater notes.


    Wednesday, Oct. 13: M.O. Students will be able to research and translate one Canterbury Tale in a Type II.
    AGENDA:
    Vocabulary and journal time. 1) Research one Canterbury Tale we have not already read in class. Write the plot, the moral, and a description of the characters. Use the Web to complete this assignment. 2) Write a list of items that shows how Chaucer's tales give today's reader a window into the fourteenth century and earlier. Use class discussion, online research, and your textbook (pages 55-87) as sources for this assignment.
    Homework:Read the "Focus on Narrative Writing" on page 80 and actually write a description (character traits) of a special family member. Remember to show not tell. Include their physical characteristics as well as their emotional behaviors.

    .

    Thursday, Oct. 14: M.O. Students will be able to take notes on one of Chaucer's tales from Canterbury Tales and be able to state the moral of the story, the plot, and describe the characters in a Type II.
    AGENDA:
    Vocabulary studying Princeton 1D; independent research of one tale not already heard.
    Homework: Study for vocabulary Quiz. Chaucer's Vocabulary sent via email to class.

    Friday, Oct. 15: M.O. SWBAT take a vocabulary quiz with at least 70% accuracy.
    AGENDA:
    Study for quiz, Vocab quiz Princeton Review ID, Complete the handout "Medieval Particulars" in class with a full half page response to the final question. Post character assigned characteristics.


    Monday, Oct. 18: M.O. SWBAT share their character through a "poster" with their peers during an oral presentation.
    AGENDA:
    Study for Vocab test using Chaucer's vocabulary (test Thursday), Canterbury Tale character sharing.
    Homework Study for Chaucer vocabulary. Rewrite four Canterbury Tales character notes.

    Tuesday, Oct. 19: M.O. SWBAT share their character with their peers during an oral presentation.
    AGENDA:
    Study for Vocab test Chaucer's vocabulary, etc (test Thursday), Finish Canterbury Tales character sharing.
    Homework Study for Chaucer test. Review your Canterbury Tales character notes.

    Wednesday, Oct. 20: M.O. SWBAT take notes to prepare for a Unit test on Chaucer.
    AGENDA:
    Review notes for test. Study for test on Chaucer's vocabulary using online teacher-created games (test Thursday). Small group quiz.
    Homework Study for Chaucer test. Review your Canterbury Tales character notes, class notes, and any post-its taken in class on the material in the textbook.

    Thursday, Oct. 21: M.O. SWBAT take a Unit test with at least 70% accuracy on Chaucer's world.
    AGENDA:
    Chaucer test.
    Homework: none, unless behind in other assignments. Bring your textbook.

    Friday, Oct. 22: M.O. SWBAT a department essay using a topic sentence, three facts with supporting details, and a conclusion that does not restate the introduction, but brings the reader to his/her own conclusion.
    AGENDA:
    Dept. essay, Ballads.
    Homework: none, unless behind in other assignments. Have a good weekend!

    Monday, Oct. 25: M.O. SWBAT read a ballad and explain its form.
    AGENDA:
    Vocabulary on Literary Terminology, Ballads: 1. Read page 105 about early English and Scottish ballads.
    2. Read your assigned ballad: "Sir Patrick Spens" (pg 106),"Bonnie George Campbell" (pg 107), "Bonny Barbara Allen" (pg 108), and "Get Up and Bar the Door" (pg 109). Complete assigned questions depending on your group. Be ready to discuss their form (stanza, rhyme, meter look these up in the Literary Elements section of your textbook if you can't remember exactly what they are).
    Make a list of all the literary elements found in a ballad (look at the first page on ballads).
    Research the web for current songs with the elements of ballads.
    Find one "old" ballad and one modern day ballad online and print out the verses. Share tomorrow. (Keep the contents professional)


    Tuesday, Oct. 26: M.O. Students will be able to recognize a ballad's literary elements by finding a current piece of music with at least five of these elements and sharing it with the class.

    AGENDA:
    Vocabulary and journal time, Ballads discussion and class list , then sharing. Vocab. Quiz Thursday. (Lit. Terminology), share ballads orally and identify the literary elements in each through oral discussion.


    Ballads

    * Ballads (fifteenth century)
    * From traditions and everyday life of common people
    * Most popular themes: disappointed love, jealousy, revenge, sudden disaster, and daring deeds
    * Simple and direct narrative
    * Storyline developed largely through dialogue
    * Hinted narrative: little detail
    * "Refrain" or "incremental repetition" often used
    * Musical in nature; meant to be sung
    * Passed on by word of mouth
    * Impossible to trace original authors
    * Not printed until the eighteenth century


    Hmwk: Write a ballad or bring in a song that meets at least four of the elements of a ballad.

    Wednesday, Oct. 27: M.O. Students will be able to highlight important points on a "Sonnet" handout and differentiate between the Italian and English ryhme-scheme by finding one example of each online.
    AGENDA:
    Vocabulary, Journal writing; share song ballad, begin sonnets.
    * Share songs with ballad elements in small groups.
    Discuss Shakespeare sonnets (pg 166-169) (Sonnets 18, 29, 116)
    HMWK: Vocabulary quiz

    Thursday Oct 28: M.O. Students will be able to begin researching their ancestry using Internet search skills on the computers and print out at least three sets of family trees. AGENDA: Vocabulary Quiz re Lit. Terminology, dialogue sharing, I-Search ancestry introduction, Pair Share.
    * I-Search paper introduction; ancestry research.
    Pair Share
    HOMEWORK: 1. Write a short dialogue of another quarrel you heard recently or were involved in. This can be from a personal experience, or from a fictional one (television, movie). Be sure to reference the first quarrel assignment and use correct punctuation. 2. Begin collecting information about your own family tree.l Try to go back at least three generations. 3. Revise any incompletes and return.

    Friday Oct. 29: M.O. Students will be able to revise a dialogue by inserting tone.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary quiz (SAT IIB). Tone re dialogue.
    Work on I Search Album: ancestry family trees using information collected.

    Monday, Nov. 1: M.O. Students (male) will be able to write in small groups a response to the Nymph in Sir Walter Raleigh's's reply to Christopher Marlowe's Shepherd and then the ladies will create a response to their poem.
    AGENDA:
    Journal, Nymph poems responses, Sharing, Intro to "I-Search."

    Tuesday Nov. 2: M.O. Students will be able to share appropriate web sites for their I-Search Chapter 1 project re ancestry.
    AGENDA:
    Journal time. I-Search independent time.


    Wednesday Nov. 3: M.O. SWBAT complete their work for the quarter.
    AGENDA: Journal time. Nymph response, independent work. Write 10 questions for the I-Search.

    Thursday Nov. 4: M.O. Students will be able to work independently on their I-Search Chapter 1 project re ancestry.
    AGENDA:
    Journal time. I-Search independent time.

    Friday Nov. 5: M.O. Students will be able to work independently on their I-Search Chapter 1 project re ancestry.
    AGENDA:
    Journal time. I-Search independent work; revision time.


    Senior Memory I-Search

    INTRODUCTION

    This semester, we will complete a Senior Memory I-Search. Each chapter will be evaluated separately, and the final “album” will be evaluated for an overall grade at the end of the semester. By that time, you should have bought/found a large photo album or binder of some sort. Three-ring binders work best, especially those with plastic fronts, where you can create and design a very personal cover. During the semester, place each returned chapter into the album in an attractive way, along with illustrations for each chapter (hand-drawn, computer generated, photographs, items). This will save you time at the end of the semester. The first thing you will do is generate a list of ten questions you want answers to about your own life. These questions will be answered through interviews, research, data collection, and analysis, which will be compiled into chapters. Each chapter will include an annotated resource page, which lists all the sources you used for that particular chapter and a one-two sentence description of the results of research from this source. The major grade, however, will be the final album, which will be graded for content, organization, development, and accuracy in mechanics. This means you need to proofread and edit, have the piece peer edited, and rewrite it before turning it in for a grade! I expect final typed drafts, not rough drafts, as each chapter is turned in. Unless requested otherwise, please include all pictures, items you have collected over the years, examples of your schoolwork, etc. with the final project.

    I suggest you buy a folder that seals in some way or use a hard copy file in my room to keep all your work in. I will also give you a manila folder to turn your chapter work in with. As the folder is returned to you with the marked rubric, please remove the work and put it in your larger folder. Use the manila folder for the next chapter.

    Due dates for each chapter will be given at a later date and will NOT be subject to change. If you’re having trouble keeping up due to circumstances beyond your control, I expect you to let me know and be in my room after school making sure you complete the work, so you can graduate on time.

    Guiding Questions:

    What are the fundamental reasons for writing a research/I-search paper?
    Why is it necessary to complete accurate research when writing a research paper?
    How will learning how to write a research paper benefit me in the future?
    Why are annotated bibliographies essential for this type of research?

    Student Questions:
    Ask yourself ten questions about your own life and then do the research through the I-search paper to answer these questions. Go back to these questions in your final reflection/Epilogue.

    ASSIGNMENTS


    Chapter 1: “My Heritage” Write a description of your ethnic background, being sure you include both parent’s genealogy. Do some research online about the countries where your ancestors originated. Turn in a list of at least four sources: individuals in your family, family history pamphlets from family reunions, library research on your name, online research about the country your ancestors originated from, etc. Include a family tree chart. This can be a computer generated one or a hand drawn one.

    Resources: Internet, parents, family members, encyclopedias, books. (Include in your annotated bibliography)

    EXTRA CREDIT: Have one or more relatives write a brief reflection about your family before you were born: your parents' marriage, births of older siblings, etc.

    NOTE: FINAL BOOK MUST INCLUDE ALL CHAPTERS SO HANG ONTO ALL THE ROUGH DRAFT CHAPTERS AS THEY ARE RETURNED TO YOU. Revise and edit for the final book as it will be graded as a whole.

    Chapter 2: “The People in My Life” This chapter will be a collective biography. You must write a biography of at least two family members. Each biography should be at least one typed, double spaced page. Interview family members about their growing up and how things are different now than they were back then. You may include as many additional biographies as you want; in fact, this is a section you may want to keep coming back to throughout the school year and your life to add more information.
    Resources: Family members (Include in your annotated bibliography)

    Chapter 3: “Family Lore” Collect at least three family stories from a variety of family members. These can be about you or about someone else in your family. You may want to try to find one story about each member of your family. You may collect these in person by actually sitting down and talking to the family member, or you may want to write, either via e-mail or regular mail, to that person. Encourage the person you talk to, to be as detailed as possible and even to provide pictures if possible (photocopies are fine). Put the five stories together in whatever logical order you feel is best; write an introduction and a conclusion. Within the first paragraph of each story, or as a separate introduction if you write the story in that person's voice, identify the teller and his/her relationship to you. Resources: Family members (orally, e-mail, letters) (Include in your annotated bibliography)

    EXTRA CREDIT: Have one or more family member write their own stories, in addition to the three required. It would be nice to have a variety here and in that person's own handwriting, with his/her signature and a date. This would be especially meaningful from older relatives.

    NOTE: FINAL BOOK MUST INCLUDE ALL CHAPTERS SO HANG ONTO ALL THE ROUGH DRAFT CHAPTERS AS THEY ARE RETURNED TO YOU. Revise and edit for the final book as it will be graded as a whole.

    Chapter 4: “Suddenly, I Became Me” When and where were you born? Were there any unusual or humorous circumstances surrounding your birth? Did your parents know if you were a girl or a boy before you were born? How were your first and middle names chosen? Describe your first bedroom in detail. Use vivid verbs and colorful adjectives. What were the first five years like? (Look back at your baby book--first tooth? first word? first step? etc.) What memories do you have of these years? Playgroups? Playgrounds? Television shows/movies? Outside vs. inside type of child? Were younger siblings born during that time? Any childhood illnesses? What are some of those stories your mom tells you wish she didn't? What about those embarrassing pictures she still has? Any accidents? Hospital visits? Cool vacations?
    Resources: baby book, family members (Make a list of these). (Include in your annotated bibliography)

    EXTRA CREDIT: Have your mom, dad (can be both), or someone who was there write a reflection about the time leading up to your birth, their fears, excitement, etc. Ask them to sign and date it. Typed or handwritten is fine.

    Chapter 5a: “School Bells” Write about kindergarten through Grade 4: First day jitters, fears, anticipation; learning to read and write; special friends, teachers, schools; school programs (Did you play a tree in a school production or begin playing an instrument?), etc. Describe where you lived during this time and the classes you attended (teacher names, report card grades, favorite school activities). Include favorite childhood activities outside of school you enjoyed. How has your family changed from Chapter 4? What’s it like to be the youngest/oldest child at an elementary school? This is a good place to include some of your early schoolwork or artwork when you put the final album together. Start collecting now. Resources for this period can include family photo albums, school memory books, maybe elementary and middle school yearbooks, and/or parents. (Include in your annotated bibliography)

    Chapter 5b: “School Bells” Grades 5-8: Okay, you are not a "little kid" anymore. You are one of the "big kids." How was it your first day at middle school? How did you adjust from having one teacher in one classroom to having several and changing classes? How did the work change? How did your relationships with your friends and with the opposite sex change? Tell about your teachers, activities, successes, heartbreaks, accomplishments, etc. Which of your teachers are you still in touch with? Why?

    Did you attend a new school system or just a new school? Did your friends move with you or did you move and have to start all over? How do you start making "best friends”? Discuss how you have changed since elementary school. How have you changed physically? Remember those Bugs Bunny teeth everyone had in fourth grade? Are braces a part of some people’s smiles now? What new activities have you added? Are they things you wanted to do, continued doing, or someone pushed you to do? (sports/music/art/writing/ dance, etc) How has your family changed during the past few years? What do you remember about school – friends, subjects, teachers, grades, programs, clubs, etc. Do you still look up to the same people? Anyone new on that list?
    You may want to include some of these ideas: "Growing Pains, Crushes, and Being a Good Sport" – Write about the first crush you had. Who was it? What happened? Did you become active in sports during this time? Which ones? Were you a standout or a quick learner? Are sports friends different from class time friends? What were some of the "growing pains" you went through during this pre-adolescent time in your life? Your body is beginning to change; girls outgrow boys; you’re finally growing into those Bugs Bunny teeth or are braces part of the picture? What about your feet? Are they the right size? This is usually the clumsy period. How did you survive?
    Resources: Mom! Dad! Coaches! Older siblings, friends, old pictures, middle school yearbooks, personal/family albums (include in your annotated bibliography).

    EXTRA CREDIT: If you are still in touch with any of your teachers from these years, ask them to write a memory about you.

    NOTE: FINAL BOOK MUST INCLUDE ALL CHAPTERS SO HANG ONTO ALL THE ROUGH DRAFT CHAPTERS AS THEY ARE RETURNED TO YOU. Revise and edit for the final book as it will be graded as a whole. Choose one of the following for Chapter 6.

    Chapter 6a:
    “I Grew Up Here!” Write a chapter about your home and neighborhood. You may have moved around a bit; if so, include information about all the homes you've lived in. Describe your bedroom over the years. How did your space change as you grew up? Describe the colors, decorations, etc. of your various rooms. What is in your room now that you wouldn’t give up for anything? Any special stuffed animals? What is their history? Books? What technology is in your room? Have you always had it? When do you remember buying your first cell phone, your first computer, your first radio/boombox/Ipod/stereo system? Which are the most important? How has your appreciation of music changed over the years? What was the neighborhood like? Was there one special hangout that all the kids went to? Make the reader see the various places you have lived. Use vibrant and dramatic descriptions.
    Resources: parents, your own memories, old pictures of various places you've lived. (Include in your annotated bibliography)

    OR


    Chapter 6b: “I Wish I Could See_______Again!” Tell about a childhood friend, neighbor, or teacher that you have no contact with any more, but would like to sit down and chat with one more time. What was your relationship with this person like originally? What happened to change the relationship? Why would you like to see this person now? What would you tell this person?
    OR “Besides My Parents, There Was...” Write about the one most influential person, other than your parents, in your life. I know this is difficult to do, but don't waffle here and don’t select more than one. Do some soul searching and choose the ONE person who has been MOST influential. Tell why you chose that person.
    Resources: Friends, neighbors, family members, yourself (Include in your annotated bibliography)

    NOTE: FINAL BOOK MUST INCLUDE ALL CHAPTERS SO HANG ONTO ALL THE ROUGH DRAFT CHAPTERS AS THEY ARE RETURNED TO YOU. Revise and edit for the final book as it will be graded as a whole.

    Chapter 7a: “Final Chapter” Your High School Years: (Freshman) - “Wanna buy an elevator pass, Kid?” “Hey, don't mess with me or I'll stuff you in a locker.” Wow! Remember those days when YOU were the new student and it seemed as if everyone else was a whole foot taller than you? Remember coming to the BIG school and thinking you would never find your way around? How was your freshman year? What were some of your anxieties? What was the transition from middle school to high school like? What were some of the myths you heard about high school? Were any of them true? Did you fall for any of them? How did you manage to "fit in" to high school life: pep rallies, cheerleading, ballgames, homecoming, clubs, new subjects, teachers, grades and studying, new building, and new friends?

    Chapter 7b: “Final Chapter” Your High School Years: (Sophomore – Junior Years) – Did the next two years fly or drip like molasses? Are you more comfortable? Any school policy changes and did any of them affect you? Write about learning to drive, beginning to date, finding that first job (keep it? fired or quit? another job), why you need a job, becoming more involved in school, the proms, class rings, becoming more responsible, wanting more independence, college thoughts, moving up the class ladder--still not at the top…but close.
    Then you moved on…
    Resources: No one likes to do it, but you MUST go back to your freshman yearbook and look at your picture! Old playbills, bulletins, newspaper clippings, autograph books, report cards, transcripts, friends etc. (iclude in your annotated bibliography).
    EXTRA CREDIT: Have at least one teacher (freshman, sophomore, or junior) write a memory for your book.

    Chapter 8: “At Last, I'm a Senior!” Write a reflection about your senior year – having a locker by yourself, sitting for your senior portrait, where do you eat in the cafeteria, paying those dues, choosing graduation invitations, getting measured for your cap and gown, choosing a college essay topic, writing a college essay, submitting those college applications, visiting college campuses, looking for a job, making life-decisions, driving, and having your own parking spot! How did it feel to go through all those “lasts” – last time for summer reading (grin), last pep rally, last football or basketball game (or other sport), last semester? Was it everything you expected or a little different? How did YOU treat this year's freshmen? What are you feeling now as you get ready to embark on a new chapter of your life? Is college a part of your dreams? Where are you going or at least where do you want to go? If not college, then what? Are you ready to be an adult with all the responsibilities and financial obligations? How do you feel about all this? Are your long-time friends part of your future? Where does your family stand in your decisions – do they support you or is life difficult? What are your dreams for five years down the road?
    Resources: Yourself, senior pictures, friends, parents, college essay (include in your annotated bibliography).

    NOTE: FINAL BOOK MUST INCLUDE ALL CHAPTERS SO HANG ONTO ALL THE ROUGH DRAFT CHAPTERS AS THEY ARE RETURNED TO YOU. Revise and edit for the final book as it will be graded as a whole.

    EXTRA CREDIT: Have one or both of your parents write a brief reflection of the past twelve years and/or have a favorite teacher write a memory to put in your book. If the parent writes it in a language other than English, please translate and include the original and the translation.

    That's it. Once I return Chapter 8 to you, you only have to write the Epilogue and put the finishing touches on the album as a whole. Decorate the outside to reflect who you are. Make sure to have at least two items per chapter or part of a chapter to illustrate that chapter. For example: Chapters 5 and 7 should have at least four items – two for ‘A” and two for “B.”
    Have fun! Remember, this is your legacy!

    EPILOGUE: Write a thoughtful, reflective wrap-up essay on one of the following two topics.

    “If I Could Live My Life Over Again, I would...”
    Or
    “Why I Would Not Change Anything about My Life”




    Monday Nov. 8: M.O. Students will be able to peer edit the first chapter of their I-Search Chapter 1 project re ancestry using the handout.
    AGENDA: Journal and vocab time (SAT Vocabulary 1A, quiz on Friday). I-Search peer edit; revision time. Chapter 1 and Family Tree completed by Friday. Make up Literary Vocabulary Quiz!
    Homework: Continue collecting information about your own family tree. Try to go back at least three generations. You will plug in this information on Wednesday.

    Tuesday Nov. 9: M.O. Students will be able to compare Edmund Spenser's sonnets to Sir Philip Sidney's sonnets in a short essay.
    AGENDA:
    Journal, Read pgs. 154 -157 (Spenser). Complete "For Study and Discussion" on page 157. Read pgs. 158-159 (Sidney). Complete "For Study and Discussion" on page 160. Summary. Due Monday, Nov. 15.
    Homework: Study for SAT Vocabulary 1A Quiz, and continue working on Chapter 1.

    Wednesday Nov. 10: M.O. Students will be able to research family trees on the computers and print out at least one family tree style that would work with their own family.
    AGENDA: journal, vocabulary (SAT Vocab. 1A quiz on Friday) time, I-Search ancestry, Pair Share.
    Homework: Study for SAT Vocabulary 1A Quiz, and continue working on Chapter 1.
    Extra Credit: 1. Write a short dialogue of a quarrel you heard recently or were involved in. This can be from a personal experience, or from a fictional one (television, movie). 2. Proofread orally. Be sure to use correct punctuation. Do not write as a play. Write the dialogue into your paragraphs.


    Thursday Nov. 11: Veterans' Day: Sleep in! Study for Vocab quiz 1A on Friday.

    Friday Nov. 12: M.O. Students will be able to complete their Family Trees including birth, marriage, and death dates.
    AGENDA:
    Vocabulary quiz (SAT Vocab. 1A). Family Trees. Continue working on I Search Album: Chapter 1 due today.



    Monday Nov. 15: M.O. Students will be able to complete their Family Trees including birth, marriage, and death dates using Inspiration.
    AGENDA:
    Study for Vocabulary quiz (SAT Vocab. 1B on Thursday). Turn in homework re poetry:154 -157 (Spenser). Complete "For Study and Discussion" on page 157. Read pgs. 158-159 (Sidney). Complete "For Study and Discussion" on page 160. Summary. Family Trees re Inspiration.
    HMWK: Begin working on I Search Album, Chapter 2; collect data. Chapter 1 was due last Friday.

    Tuesday Nov. 16: M.O. Students will begin writing Chapter II for the I-Search project using the information researched from their families, their friends, and themselves.
    AGENDA:
    Vocabulary study (SAT Vocab. 1B on Thursday). Independent work on Chapter II of the I-Search project.
    HMWK: Continue working on I Search Album, Chapter 2; collect additional data.

    Wednesday Nov. 17: M.O. Students will continue writing Chapter II for the I-Search project using the information researched from their families, their friends, and themselves.
    AGENDA:
    Vocabulary study (SAT Vocab. 1B on Thursday). Independent work on Chapter II of the I-Search project. Peer edit.
    HMWK: Finish working on I Search Album, Chapter 2, which is due Friday.

    Thursday Nov. 18: M.O. Students will be able to write a dialogue based on a personal experience using appropriate punctuation and format structure.
    Agenda:
    Vocab. quiz SAT Vocab. 1B. Journal. Mini-lesson re punctuation and format re dialogue. Independent writing of a short quarrel you heard recently or were involved in. This can be from a personal experience, or from a fictional one (television, movie). Be sure to use correct punctuation, including quotation marks. Change paragraphs for every speaker. Each student must include one of the following in their quarrel: faux pas (French), femme fatale (French), feng shui (Mandarin Chinese), fiasco (Italian), du jour (French), double entendre (French), dungarees (Hindi), de rigueur (French), vendetta (Italian), cushy (Urdu), paparazzi (Italian), or mea culpa (Latin). Small group sharing - explain the word/phrase used and how it applies to the quarrel/argument.

    Friday Nov. 19: M.O. Students will be able to complete Chapter 2 of their I-Search.
    AGENDA:
    Journal. Independent work after final peer review and rubric check.


    Monday Nov. 22: M.O. Students will be able to complete Chapter #3 of their I-Search Album.
    AGENDA:
    No vocabulary this week - Journal; Independent work on Chapters 1-3.
    HMWK: Chapter #3 of I Search Album due Monday.

    Tuesday Nov. 23: M.O. Students will be able to complete Chapter #3 of their I-Search Album.
    AGENDA:
    No vocabulary this week - Journal; Independent revision re Chapters 1-2; work on Chapter 3.
    HMWK: Chapter #3 of I Search Album due Monday.


    Monday Nov. 29: M.O. Students will be able to rewrite their dialogue using foreign words to map the emotions of the piece.
    AGENDA:
    Vocabulary this week - SAT Kaplan #2A; Mini-lesson on "Je Ne Sais Quoi" words; Dialogue revision independently; small group sharing re dialogues; Begin work on Chapter #4.
    HMWK: Chapter #4 of I Search Album due Friday.

    Tuesday Nov. 30: M.O. Students will be able to continue writing their Chapter 4 for the I-Search album using peer and teacher generated critiquing.
    AGENDA:
    Vocabulary this week - SAT Kaplan #2A; Small group sharing re homework, then turn the dialogue homework in after revision if needed; Independent work on Chapter #4 of I-Search Album.
    HMWK: Chapter #4 of I Search Album due Friday.

    Wednesday Dec. 1: M.O. Students will continue writing Chapter 4 for the I-Search project using the information researched from their families, their friends, and themselves.
    AGENDA:
    Vocabulary study (SAT Vocab. 2A on Thursday). Independent work on Chapter 4 of the I-Search project. Peer edit using handout.
    HMWK: Finish working on I Search Album, Chapter 4, which is due Friday. Peer critique on Thursday. Vocab. Quiz on 2A.

    Thursday Dec. 2: M.O. Students will be able to take a SAT Kaplan vocabulary quiz with at least 70% accuracy.
    Agenda:
    Vocab. quiz SAT Vocab. 2A. Mini-lesson re annotated bibliography and in-line citations. Peer critique.
    Begin Macbeth. Students will research the Globe Theater and create a picture of London's theater districts from 1576-1606 including a sidebar of the physical description of the current Globe Theater and its history.
    Design/draw/create picture of London with theaters marked (the Theater, Globe Theater, Blackfriar's [first and second], The Swan, Whitehall Theater, Whitefriars Theater + any three more). Research the current Globe Theater and compare the old Globe to the current Globe through pictures and captions. Point out the differences. Don't forget to include attributions. Hmwk: Complete theater map and Globe picture comparisons. Due Friday. Work on Chapter 5A of I-Search Album (Due Monday) 5B will be due next Thursday.

    Friday Dec. 3: M.O. Students will be able to share theater pics and Globe picture comparisons in small groups and point out the differences.
    AGENDA:
    Journal. Small group work re theater district during Shakespeare's time. (1576-1606). If time, students will work on Chapter 5A of the I-Search Album.
    Work on Chapter 5 of the I-Search album. 5A is due Monday and 5B is due by Thursday.


    Monday, Dec. 6: M.O. SWBAT take notes on Shakespeare's Macbeth in order to begin undetrstading the background of the Scottish play.
    AGENDA:
    SAT Kaplan Vocab 2B (quiz on Thursday). Chapter 5A due today. Introduction to Shakespeare. Handouts. Small group work re witches. (Find three paintings depicting the witches in Macbeth. Insults.
    Hmwk: Chapter 5B of the I-Search due on Thursday.

    Tuesday, Dec. 7: M.O. SWBAT share research from small group work on Monday re Macbeth and take notes.
    AGENDA:
    Journals, Vocab 2B (quiz on Thursday). Chapter 5B due Thursday. Sharing from handout research. Shakespeare's English, Independent work on Chapter 5A or revision of previous chapters.


    Wednesday, Dec. 8: M.O. SWBAT work independently on Chapter 5B after a peer critique including three questions that will need to be answered in the body of this chapter.
    AGENDA:
    Vocab 2B (quiz on Thursday). Independent work.
    Small group work: Read pages 174-177 in the textbook. List all the words you are unfamiliar with and their definitions.


    Thursday, Dec. 9: M.O. SWBAT take a vocabulary quiz with 70% accuracy.
    AGENDA:
    Vocab 2B (quiz today). Common words in Shakespeare's time (notetaking re Shakespeare's English). Mini-lesson on editorials. Small group work re editorials in the newspaper. Begin assignment re an editorial written in the seventeenth century to a newspaper about the siting of a group of women dancing around a fire.
    Homework Finish writing the editorial to a seventeenth century newspaper about the siting of a group of women dancing around a fire. Begin work on Chapter 6 of the I-Search ("I Grew Up Here" or "I Wish I Could See...") This is due on Wednesday.
    Macbeth.


    Friday, Dec. 10: M.O. SWBAT continue writing Chapter 6 of the I-Search project.
    AGENDA:
    No vocabulary for next week. Journal. Chapter 6 of the I-Search project independent work. Update bibliography information to complete annotated bibliography. Peer critiquing on Tuesday with revision time.
    Hmwk: Work on Chapter 6. Critiquing on Tuesday with revisions then. Due on Wednesday with updated bibliography.


    Monday, Dec. 13: M.O. SWBAT read Act 1 of Macbeth and summarize with bullets each scene.
    AGENDA:
    no quiz. Journal: your choice.. Chapter 6 due Wed. Share witch pics with anothe person in class. Explain each one. Orally read Act I of Macbeth by William Shakespeare. List bullets for a summary of each scene with a partner. If time, work on Chapter 6.
    Hmwk: Chapter 6 of the I-Search due on Wednesday.


    Tuesday, Dec. 14: M.O. SWBAT work independently writing Chapter 6 of their I-Search project.
    AGENDA:
    Journals, Make up any vocab quizes missing after school (no quiz this week). Chapter 6 due tomorrow (Wed.). Independent work on Chapter 6 or revision of previous chapters. Peer edit. Rubric checkoff.
    Hmwk: Chapter 6 of the I-Search due on Wednesday.


    Wednesday, Dec. 15: M.O. SWBAT read Act II of Macbeth and summarize each scene with bullets.
    AGENDA:
    Journal. Turn in Chapter 6. Orally read Macbeth. List bullets for a summary of each scene with a partner.


    Thursday, Dec. 16: M.O. SWBAT read Act III of Macbeth and summarize each scene with bullets.
    AGENDA:
    Journal. Chapter 7 due Monday. Orally read Macbeth, Act III. List bullets for a summary of each scene with a partner.

    Friday, Dec. 17: M.O. SWBAT independently work on Chapter 7 of their I-Search project.
    AGENDA:
    Journal, independent work.
    Hmwk: Chapter 7 of the I-Search due on Monday.


    Monday, Dec. 20: M.O. SWBAT read Act IV of Macbeth and summarize with bullets each scene.
    AGENDA:
    Chapter 7 due today. Peer edit/revise/check rubric. Orally read Act IV of Macbeth by William Shakespeare. List bullets for a summary of each scene with a partner.
    Hmwk: Chapter 8 of the I-Search due on Monday, Jan. 2 along with illustrations for each chapter.


    Tuesday, Dec. 21: M.O. SWBAT work independently writing Chapter 8 of their I-Search project. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.
    AGENDA:
    Independent work.
    Hmwk: Chapter 8 of the I-Search due on Monday, Jan. 2 along with illustrations for each chapter.

    ********** MERRY CHRISTMAS AND HAPPY NEW YEAR **********
    WELCOME TO 2011


    Monday, Jan. 3, 2011: M.O. SWBAT peer proof Chapter 8 of their I-Search projects using a rubric.

    AGENDA:
    Review of I-search final dates and questions. 10 minutes to print. Peer edit Chapter 8 using the rubric in folder. Independent work to edit, revise, and print final copy. Illustration share for each chapter. Questions to answer: 1. How do my pictures/illustrations illustrate each chapter? 2. What other ideas could I use to enhance my project? 3. Which chapters need additional illustrations? 4. what are other options if pictures are unavailable? Final wrap-up.
    Hmwk: Begin completing final chapters with illustrations. Use plastic sheeting and/or a notebook to show off your project. Design a cover page. Begin theTable of Contents. Number the pages as your last task.

    Tuesday, Jan. 4: M.O. SWBAT read Act IV of Macbeth and summarize with bullets each scene.
    AGENDA:
    Orally read Act IV of Macbeth by William Shakespeare. List bullets for a summary of each scene with a partner.
    Hmwk: The complete I-Search Project is due on Friday, Jan. 7 along with illustrations for each chapter. Continue working on putting it together.


    Wednesday, Jan. 5: M.O. SWBAT work independently finalizing their I-Search project.
    AGENDA:
    Independent work. Pair sharing. Title page designing using WordArt.
    Hmwk: The complete I-Search Project is due on Friday, Jan. 7 along with illustrations for each chapter. Continue working on putting it together. Students will write the final chapter in class on Thursday. Be sure to reread the prompt and have some ideas before coming to class.

    Thursday, Jan. 6: M.O. SWBAT write their final chapter using the prompt (see folder) to explain their thoughts about this I-Search project.
    AGENDA:
    Group brainstorming. Independent writing. If time, students may peer edit.
    Hmwk: The complete I-Search Project is due tomorrow, Friday, Jan. 7 along with illustrations for each chapter, a cover page, a final annotated bibliography, a table of contents, and the final chapter revised. Put the finishing touches on your amazing projects.

    Friday, Jan. 7: M.O. SWBAT share their I-Search projects and then answer six questions about at least five projects.
    AGENDA:
    Project share: Answer these questions about at least five projects. 1. What was the most impressive part of the student's project? 2. Which chapter did you think was most interesting? Why? 3. Which illustrations caught your attention? Please explain. 4. What is your overall impression of the project? (At least three sentences) 5. What could the student have added to make the project more complete? 6. Read the final chapter. Bullet at least three of your own comments about the author's thoughts.
    Do this for five I-search Projects and turn in your work along with your I-Search. You're done with the major part of the course. Let's finish Macbeth.


    Monday, Jan. 10, 2011: M.O. SWBAT continue reading orally Act IV of Macbeth, while taking notes.
    AGENDA:
    Vocabulary activity (Shakespeare's Vocabulary), Oral reading of Macbeth. pairing for bulleting of scenes.

    Tuesday, Jan. 11: M.O. SWBAT read Act V of Macbeth and summarize with bullets each scene.
    AGENDA:
    Vocabulary; I-Search: Go back to your original ten questions and see if you answered them in your research. Explain each question and tell which chapter it is in (if you can't fin the questions, list ten facts you found out during your research); Orally read Macbeth, Pairing for scene bulleting.

    SNOWDAY: Wednesday, Jan. 12:

    SNOWDAY: Thursday, Jan. 13:

    Friday, Jan. 14: M.O. SWBAT watch Macbeth and compare the movie to the play.
    AGENDA:
    Movie in mini-auditorium; homework - describe three things that were the same and three things that were different when comparing the movie to the play. List three quotes that studck out in your mind from this first three acts. Who said them and to whom were they said? What did they mean? finish reading Act V for homework. Summarize each scene with bullets.


    Tuesday, Jan. 18: M.O. SWBAT finish watching Macbeth and compare the movie to the play.
    AGENDA:
    Movie in mini-auditorium; homeowrk - describe three things that were the same and three things that were different when comparing the movie to the play. Explain which you prefer and why.


    Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2011: M.O. SWBAT take notes as the teacher reviews for a test on Macbeth .
    AGENDA:
    Vocabulary activity quiz (Shakespeare's Vocabulary), Review of Macbeth. Note sharing and preparing. Return I-search and discuss.

    Thursday, Jan. 20: M.O. SWBAT take a test on Macbeth with at least 70% accuracy.
    AGENDA:
    Final for Macbeth.

    Friday, Jan. 21: Snowday


    Monday, Jan. 24, 2011: M.O. SWBAT take a department post test and receive at least 4 out of 7 on the department rubric.
    AGENDA:
    Vocabulary activity (Senior English), department essay. return of I-Search. Begin final review.

    Tuesday, Jan. 25: M.O. SWBAT take notes during a review for the final.
    AGENDA:
    Review, vocabulary review

    Wednesday, Jan. 26: FINALS; A and B blocks

    Thursday, Jan. 27: FINALS; C and D blocks

    Friday, Jan. 28: Finals returned and transition day





















    ****************************STOP***************************




























































    HMWK:Begin reading Act One, Scenes 1-2 of Macbeth for Monday.
    Monday: M.O. SWBAT access online vocabulary and familiarize themselves with the website.
    AGENDA:
    Tuesday: M.O. SWBAT take an open book/text test on Beowulf to show their understnding of the epic poem.
    AGENDA:
    Wednesday: M.O. SWBAT brainstorm and list the qualities needed in a college essay, then write their first paragraph.
    AGENDA:

    Thursday: M.O. SWBAT write the second paragraph of their college essay after discussing paragraph structure and becoming familiar with essay formula.
    AGENDA:
    Friday: M.O. SWBAT orally analyze Harvard acceptance college essays after listening to a few.
    AGENDA:
    Monday: M.O. SWBAT peer edit the third paragraph of their college essay after reviewing paragraph structure, essay formula, and the analysis comments from the Harvard essays.
    AGENDA:
    Tuesday: M.O. Students will be able to peer edit the third and fourth paragraphs of their partner's essay using a class generated list of items to look for.
    AGENDA:

    Wednesday: M.O. Students will be able to highlight important points on a "Sonnet" handout and differentiate between the Italian and English ryhme-scheme by finding one example of each online.
    AGENDA:

    Thursday: M.O. Students will be able to write a "Sonnet" choosing either the Italian (Petrarchan) or English (Elizabethan/Shakespearean) rhyme scheme.
    AGENDA:

    Friday: M.O. Students will be able to write a five paragraph Type III essay by responding to an English Department writing prompt.
    AGENDA:

    Monday: M.O. Students (male) will be able to write in small groups a response to the Nymph in Sir Walter Raleigh's's reply to Christopher Marlowe's Shepherd and then the ladies will create a response to that poem.
    AGENDA:

    Tuesday: M.O. Students will be able to edit their college essay and rewrite it following suggestions.
    AGENDA:

    Wednesday: M.O. Students will be able to identify an English sonnet vs. an Italian sonnet by creating a list of characteristics.
    AGENDA:

    Thursday: M.O. Students will be able to compare Edmund Spenser's sonnets to Sir Philip Sidney's sonnets in a short essay.
    AGENDA:

    Friday: M.O. Students will be attend and then analyze a presentation on the Invisible Children of Uganda in a half page Type III.
    AGENDA:

    Monday, Oct. 5: M.O. Students will be able to edit their college essay using corrected papers and peer comments in a Type III.
    AGENDA:


    Tuesday: M.O. Students will be able to research ballads and find a modern day one using the criteria listed in their book.
    AGENDA:


    Wednesday, Oct. 7: M.O. Students will be able to recognize a ballad's literary elements by finding a current piece of music with at least five of these elements and sharing it with the class.

    AGENDA:

    Thursday Oct 8: M.O. Students will be able to begin researching their ancestry using Internet search skills on the computers and print out at least three sets of family trees.
    AGENDA:

    HOMEWORK: 1. Write a short dialogue of another quarrel you heard recently or were involved in. This can be from a personal experience, or from a fictional one (television, movie). Be sure to reference the first quarrel assignment and use correct punctuation. 2. Begin collecting information about your own family tree.l Try to go back at least three generations. 3. Revise any incompletes and return.

    Friday Oct. 9: M.O. Students will be able to revise a dialogue by inserting tone.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary quiz (SAT IIB). Tone re dialogue.
    Work on I Search Album: ancestry family trees using information colelcted.


    Tuesday Oct. 13: M.O. Students will be able to share appropriate web sites for their I-Search Chapter 1 project re ancestry.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary and journal time. I-Search independent time. Bring textbooks tomorrow.


    Wednesday Oct. 14: M.O. Students will be able to translate one Canterbury Tale in a Type II.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary and journal time. Introduction to Canterbury Tales, Read Canterbury Tales from textbook. Research re one tale.
    Do: Read pages 55-56 on Chaucer and "The Prologue to the Canterbury Tales" on pages 57-59. Note that pages 58 and 59 are the same thing, only translated. Highlight the main points on sticky note/s. Then read the "Focus on Narrative Writing" on page 80 and actually write a description (character traits) of a special family member. Remember to show not tell.

    Homework From an assigned pilgrim, using a bulleted list, students will describe the characteristics both physical and emotional in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.


    Thursday/Friday Oct. 15-16: M.O. Students will be able to begin writing their Chapter I for the I-Search project using the information researched online. (Moved to Friday due to College Fair)
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary quiz (Kaplan SAT IV), annotated bibliography explanation, Independent Work re I-Search and Chapter 1 (due Friday). Turn in Chapter I of I-Search Project. Family Tree due Monday.

    Monday Oct. 19: M.O. Students will be able to take detailed bulleted notes on each of the characters in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary (SAT V) and journal. Annotated Bibliography. Read second Canterbury Tale orally. Family Tree due today. Canterbury Tales sharing of characters Monday and Tuesday.

    Tuesday Oct. 20: M.O. Students will be able to take detailed bulleted notes on each of the characters in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary and journal. Read third Canterbury Tale orally. Vocabulary for Chaucer's Canterbury Tales
    Include definitions in your notes: prologue, Magna Carta, chivalry, palmers, martyr, dirk, span, hurdy-gurdy (find a picture and include it), fee-simple, stave, tithes, excommunication, and epicurean.
    Canterbury Tales sharing of characters Monday and Tuesday. Highlight the main points from "Prologue" on sticky note/s. Then read the "Focus on Narrative Writing" on page 80 and write a description (character traits) of a special family member. Remember to show not tell. Due Wed.



    Wednesday Oct. 21: M.O. Students will be able to write their Chapter II for the I-Search project using the information researched from their families, their friends, and themselves.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary and journal. Independent work on Chapter II Biography 1.

    Thursday Oct. 22: M.O. Students will be able to analyze Chaucer's works through the lens of a fourteenth century window or through the Unit's guiding questions.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary SAT V (quiz on Monday): Study.
    Classwork: Your choice of two items: 1) Write a list of items that shows how Chaucer's tales give today's reader a window into the fourteenth century and earlier. Use class discussion, online research, and your textbook (pages 55-87) as sources for this assignment.
    OR 2) Think about how Chaucer epitomizes the overall questions of this unit. (How does one generation see another? How does the older generation affect those who come after? What are the responsibilities of the younger generation to the older generation). Make a detailed bulleted list for each question including citations. Be ready to discuss on Monday in class. Due Friday. Highlight the main points from "Prologue" on sticky note/s.
    Write the character traits for your pilgrim if you haven't already on the easel on the page after we left off yesterday.
    Begin research on Chapter 2. Talk to your parents, other members of the family, and friends! Have the research ready to begin writing on Monday.



    Friday Oct. 23: M.O. Students will be able to use interview notes to write their Chapter II for the I-Search project using the information researched from their families, their friends, and themselves.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary and journal. Independent work on Chapter II Biography 2. Peer edit and fix, then turn in on Monday.

    Monday Oct. 26: M.O. Repeat of Oct. 22, due to classroom move. .
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary quiz on SAT V. Chapter II Biography (2) due Friday. Canterbury Tales will be reviewed on Wednesday.

    b>Tuesday Oct. 27: M.O. Students will be able to continue working on their family biographes.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary (SAT VI) and journal. Independent work. Chapter II Biography 2 due Friday. Canterbury Tales tale.

    Wednesday Oct. 28 1/2 day: M.O. Students will be able to take notes for a final test on Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary (Chaucer's Vocab) and journal. Chapter II Biography 2 due today. Canterbury Tales review for Test on Tuesday.

    Thursday Oct. 29: M.O. Students will be able to take a final test on Chaucer's Canterbury Tales using only their notes.
    AGENDA:
    SSR/study, vocabulary (Chaucer's Vocab = wordle). Final Test. If time, continue working on the two biographies due Friday.

    Friday, Oct. 30: M.O. SWBAT take a department essay to improve their essay writing skills for the SAT.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, Dept. essay Peer editing of Bios. Due at the end of the class.


    Monday, Nov. 2: M.O. SWBAT take notes on Shakespeare's Macbeth in order to begin undetrstading the background of the Scottish play.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, Vocab VI (quiz on Thursday). Bios late one day. Introduction to Shakespeare. Handouts. Small group work re witches. Insults.


    Tuesday, Nov. 3: M.O. SWBAT share research from small group work on Monday re Macbeth and take notes.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, Journals, Vocab VI (quiz on Thursday). Bios late two days. Sharing from handout research. Shakespeare's English. Insults.


    Wednesday, Nov. 4: M.O. SWBAT share research from small group work on Monday re Macbeth.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, Journals (10) due Monday, Vocab VI (quiz on Thursday). Bios late three days. Finsih sharing from handout research. Read pages 174-177 in your textbook. List all the words you are unfamiliar with and their definitions. Write an editorial to a seventeenth century newspaper about the siting of a group of women dancing around a fire. Common words in Shakespeare's time (notetaking). Shakespeare's English. Insults.


    Thursday, Nov. 5: GRADES CLOSE M.O. SWBAT research the Globe Theater and create a picture of London's theater districts from 1576-1606 including a sidebar of the physical description of the current Globe Theater and its history.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, Vocab VI (quiz today). Bios late four days. Research. Design/draw/create picture of London with theaters marked (the Theater, Globe Theater, Blackfriar's [first and second], The Swan, Whitehall Theater, Whitefriars Theater + any three more). Research the current Globe Theater and compare the old Globe to the current Globe through pictures. Point out the differences. Character Tree.
    Homework Design a placard of the Dramatis Personae for Macbeth.


    Friday, Nov. 6: M.O. SWBAT begin writing Chapter 3 of the I-Search project.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, Vocab VII (quiz next Thursday). Bios late five days. Bring bibliography information to complete annotated bibliography. Begin Writing next chapter. Peer critiquing on Monday.
    HMWK:Begin reading Act One, Scenes 1-2 of Macbeth for Monday.


    Monday, Nov. 9: M.O. SWBAT translate their notes into stories.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, Vocab VII (quiz on Thursday). Macbeth oral readings from CD. Group sharing from small group assignments. Handouts. "WORD" assignment to track throughout the paly. JOURNALS due (20).
    Hmwk: Study for vocab quiz, continue writing Chapter 3, and read Scenes 3-4 of Act I in Macbeth for Friday.

    Tuesday, Nov. 10: M.O. SWBAT begin writing Family stories for Chapter 3 if their I-Search paper using notes from family members and friends.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, Journals, Vocab VII (quiz on Thursday). Macbeth , Independent Writing of 3 stories. Introduction and conclusion discussed in more detail during class. Homework: Study for Vocab quiz VII. Read Act I Scenes 3-4 in Macbeth for Friday.


    Wednesday, Nov. 11: Veteran's Day

    Thursday, Nov. 12: M.O. SWBAT design a rubric for Chapter 3 of their I-Search project.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, Vocab VII (quiz today). Rubric design. Independent writing. Closure re story sharing

    Friday, Nov. 13: M.O. peer edit Chapter 3 of their I-search papers using the "I Heard, I Noticed, I Wondered" form, then correct and add details for the final copy.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, Vocab VIII (quiz next Thursday)/Journal. Macbeth Score Card handout. Peer editing. Independent work including introduction, conclusion, and annotated bibliography, sharing of best stories. Chapter 3 due today.
    Hmwk: Update your "word" tracking assignment. Read the last scenes in Act I for Monday.


    Monday, Nov. 16: M.O. SWBAT orally read Act II and analyze character traits for Macbeth and Lady Macbeth in small groups.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, Vocab VIII (quiz on Thursday)/Journal. Macbeth oral readings from CD. Class readings Act II Scene 1-4 (pg. 197-207). In small groups create a list of character traits for Lady Macbeth and Macbeth. Share with class.
    Hmwk: Update Scorecard and individual "word." Do "Reading Check" on page 208. Read Act III Scenes 1-3 (pg. 209-216 as assigned.

    Tuesday, Nov. 17: M.O. SWBAT orally read Act III and select and evaluate the most important quote from each scene.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, Vocab VIII (quiz on Thursday)/Journal. Macbeth oral readings from CD. Class readings Act III Scene 1-5 (pg. 209-222). In pairs choose the most importatn quote from each scene and evaluate its significance to the play. Share with class.
    Hmwk: Update Scorecard and individual "word." Define these words from Act III of Macbeth: parricide, dauntless, unlineal, rancors, grapples, liege, incensed, sundry, venom, gory, grandam, and infirmity. Read Act IV Scenes 1-2.

    Wednesday, Nov. 18: M.O. SWBAT orally read Act IV Scenes 1-3 and analyze Scene 1 by rewriting with modern English in pairs.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, Vocab VIII (quiz on Thursday)/Journal. Macbeth oral readings from CD. Class readings Act IV Scenes 1-3. Paired work: Rewrite Scene 1, lines 47-124 using current English. Share analysis of three apparitions' messages.
    Hmwk: Update Scorecard and individual "word." Read Act V (pgs 239-249). Be prepared to act out Scene 8.

    Thursday, Nov. 19: M.O. SWBAT orally read Act V Scenes 1-8 and act out Scene 8.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, Vocab VIII (quiz today)/Journal. Macbeth: Read Act V. Act out last scene (lines 1-34). In small groups analyze assigned quote and then share with the class.
    Hmwk: Do Reading Check on pg. 249. Wear comfortable shoes and bring enough money for the train and food.

    Friday, Nov. 20: M.O. SWBAT view the play Macbeth and discuss the differences between reading a play and watching one.
    AGENDA:
    Fieldtrip.
    Students staying: Read pages 1093-1096. Pay particular attention to "Using the Writing Process to Answer an Essay Question" on pg. 1096. Then choose one of the Writing About Literature choices under "Analyzing Character" on page 250 or #2 under "The Play as a Whole" and write a 1-2 page essay answering the prompt. Due at the end of class. If you can use a computer, please type it or print legibly.


    Monday, Nov. 23: M.O. SWBAT write a 5 paragraph department essay including a thesis statement, 2-3 examples, supporting details, and a conclusion using a Type 3 Collins writing.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, Journal. Department timed essay. Discussion of Macbeth, the play.
    Hmwk: None, except to be sure you have read the play.

    Tuesday, Nov. 24: M.O. SWBAT choose quotes from each act of Macbeth and show their significance to the act and to the play.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, Journal. Macbeth group work. In pairs choose the most important quote from each act and evaluate its significance to the act and to the play. Share with class.
    Hmwk: Update Scorecard and individual "word." Macbeth Final on Tuesday. Review on Monday.

    Monday, Nov. 30: M.O. SWBAT choose quotes from each act of Macbeth and defend their choice by explaining how each epitomizes both the act and the play.

    AGENDA:
    SSR, Shakespeare's Vocab quiz on Thursday. Finish presentations. Final review for Macbeth, closing (paired quote quiz).
    Hmwk: Study for the final of the "Scottish" play.

    Tuesday, Dec. 1: M.O. SWBAT take a final test on Macbeth and complete it with at least 65% accuracy.
    AGENDA:
    SSR Macbeth final.
    Hmwk: Update Scorecard and individual "word" for Macbeth. Due Wed. Bring textbook. Study for Vocab. quiz.


    Wednesday, Dec. 2: M.O. SWBAT discuss their tracking "word" and why it was important to William Shakespeare's writing.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, Shakespeare's Vocab. quiz on Thursday/Journal. Discuss scorecards and present individual "word" for Macbeth, closing (share one cool thing learned with neighbor).
    Hmwk: Bring textbook. Study for Vocab. quiz.

    Thursday, Dec. 3: M.O. SWBAT begin writing Chapter 4 of their I-Search using first person memories in a detailed 2 plus page story with quotations/dialogue about their first years after interviewing parents, family members, friends, etc. .
    AGENDA:
    SSR, Shakespeare's Vocab quiz today. Mini-lesson on memory writing. Begin writing Chapter 4: "Suddenly I became Me."
    Hmwk: Finish Chapter 4 for peer edit on Friday.

    Friday, Dec. 4: M.O. SWBAT peer edit Chapter 4 using a class generated list of expected criteria for a nonfiction piece of writing.
    AGENDA:
    SSR
    Vocab (IX)/Journal, Class generated list, peer editing using the list, Rewrite.
    Hmwk: Final copy of Chapter 4 due Monday. Bring textbook for Monday.


    Dec. 7, 2009 Monday: M.O. Students will be able to read an excerpt from Pride and Prejudice and explore the marriage laws of the time in England by researching on the Internet and writing a report about them compared to today in America.

    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary (IX) and journal time. (Senior Assembly)
    *Turn in Chapter 4 with rough draft peer edited.
    *Read Pg. 521 about Jane Austen. List five important details about her in your notebook including birth/death dates.
    *Read the selection "From Pride and Prejudice" by Jane Austen (pg. 522-525), research the marriage laws in England during the late eighteenth century and compare them with today's marriage laws in America. work in pairs. Be ready to present your information.
    HMWK: 1. Do the Reading Check on pg 525 and Ques. #2 under For Study and Literature.
    2. Begin Chapter 5. Rough draft due Thursday.

    Dec. 8, 2009, Tuesday: M.O. Students will be able to analyze Jane Austen's characters by their mode of speech by comparing the speechs of Collins and Elizabeth in a compare and contrast list.

    AGENDA:
    SSR, Vocabulary (IX) and journal time.
    *In small groups complete an analysis of speech patterns and as a group list three conclusions. Then explain how this piece of writing is an example of satire. Be ready to present your conclusions.
    *Work on Chapter 5.
    *HMWK: 1. Read Pg. 837 about Virginia Woolf. List five important details about her in your notebook including birth/death dates.
    2. Chapter 5 due Thursday.

    Dec. 9, 2009, Wednesday: M.O. Students will be able to write a thesis statement about the role of women in society today compared to Shakespeare's time according to Woolf, using notes taken from group work, their readings, and their own experience.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary and journal time.
    *In pairs read the excerpt from "A Room of One's Own" orally (pg. 839-841), and then in foursomes discuss possible scenarios for the young girl other than the one she took. Explain whether this could happen today.
    *Independently complete the Reading Check on pg. 841.
    *Complete the "Focus on Expository Writing" (pg. 841). Expand your classroom notes for the list of how women's role in society has changed. Then write a one-sentence thesis statement.
    *HMWK: Quiz SAT Vocab IX
    *HMWK: RD of Chapter 5 due tomorrow for peer edtitng.

    Dec. 10, 2009 Thursday: M.O. Students will be able to peer edit their peer's Chapter 5 using a class generated checkoff list.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary (IX) quiz.
    Discuss Austen and Woolf's short stories. Rewrite the thesis statement. Peer edit Chapter 5 and then begin revising. Closing.
    HMWK: Read "The Rocking Horse Winner" by D.H. Lawrence in your textbook.

    Dec. 11, 2009 Friday: M.O. Students will be able to revise their Chapter 5 and add details, along with adding sources to their annotated bibliography.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary (X), and journal time.
    Class generated rubric. Revise your Chapter 5 based on the student generated rubric. Be sure to include details and anecdotes. You must also include an annotated bibliography with this chapter.
    HMWK: Complete Chapter 5. Be sure it is typed, double spaced, page numbered, 12 font, and in Times New Roman.

    Dec. 14, 2009 Monday: M.O. Students will be able to explain the symbolism of the rocking horse in D. H. Lawrence's "The Rocking Horse Winner" by listing three quotes from the text and explaining each one.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary, and journal time.
    *Vocabulary Quiz on Thursday (V for Victory).
    **Turn in Chapter 5.
    *Read pg. 851 about D. H. Lawrence. List five important details about him in your notebook including birth/death dates.
    *Review D. H. Lawrence's "The Rocking Horse Winner" (pg. 852-861).
    *Find three quotes from the text to explain the symbolism of the rocking horse with a partner. Explain your choices in a well designed paragraph.
    *HMWK: Define "motif." Explain how Lawrence uses it in his story. List one example of this found in fairy tales or in movies. Explain your choice.
    *HMWK: Bring I-Search information for class independent work on Tuesday. Follow the prompt questions for Chapter 6. Ask questions of parents, family members, family friends, etc before beginning to write. Take notes and be sure to answer as many of the questions plus others you think of in your essay.

    Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2009: M.O. Students will be able to write a rough draft of Chapter 6 by answering the prompt questions to be peer evaluated on Thursday.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary, and journal time.
    *Vocabulary Quiz on Thursday (V for Victory).
    Independent writing of Chapter 6. Closing.
    Tell the person next to you which choice you made to write about and why.
    HMWK: Work on Chapter 6. Choose a short story in the textbook and read it. Choose three quotes/sentences that epitomize the story and in class on Wednesday, create an easel sheet with your information


    Dec. 16, 2009, Wednesday: M.O. Students will be able to share their short story with the class and explain what the story was about using three quotes.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary, and journal time.
    *Vocabulary Quiz on Thursday (V for Victory).
    20 minutes to create a quote-board.
    Presentations
    HMWK: Bring in Chapter 6 rough draft ready for peer editing.

    Dec. 17, 2009 Thursday: M.O. Students will be able to peer edit their peer's Chapter 6 using a class generated checkoff list.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary (V for Victory) quiz.
    Quiz. Peer editing. Independent revision.

    Dec. 18, 2009 Friday: Students will be able to work in independent groups to read and share a short story.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, Journal.
    Quiz. Class will design rubric for Chapter 6. Small group work. Closing.

    *Group 1: James Joyces's "Araby" (page 844). Do the Reading Check on page 847. Trace the images of light and dark throughout the story. How do they define the boy's feelings? In small groups look at pg. 848 and read the "Commentary." Do Question 1a,b,c. Share your knowledge with the rest of the class.
    *Group 2: Read Chinua Achebe's "Dead Men's Path" (page 920). Do the Reading Check on page 922. In a short essay explain who is more tolerant, Mr. Obi or the village priest? Back up your statements with quotes from the text. In small groups look at pg. 922 and do questions 2, 4, 5 together. Type up and turn in with everyone's names. Share your knowledge with the rest of the class.
    HMWK: Chapter 6 is due Monday.


    Tuesday, Dec. 22, 2009: M.O. Students will be able to peer edit the rough draft of Chapter 7 using the class generated checklist.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, journal time.
    Complete Friday's short story assignment. Independent editing and revising of Chapter 7. Closing.
    Tell the person next to you what your best and worst memory was from 9th-11th grade. Add as many details as you can.
    HMWK: Chapter 7 due Wed.


    Dec. 23, 2009, Wednesday: M.O. Students will be able to write an essay answering the English department essay question.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, Journal time.
    Final copy of Chapter 7 with annotated bibliography due. Begin Chapter 8 if already turned in.
    HMWK: Begin the process of rewriting/revising Chapters 1-7 and illustrating each with at least three items. The completed I-Search project will be due the end of the first week back. Happy holidays!


    **2010**2010**2010**2010**2010**2010**2010**2010**2010**2010
    **2010

    Monday, Jan. 4, 2010: M.O. Students will be able to begin writing the rough draft of Chapter 8 using their memories, peers, and family memories.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, journal time.
    Final Journal due Wed., Jan 13 (need 14 entries)
    Brainstorm senior events
    Include peer's memory in Chapter 8 and add peer to annotated bibliography as an interview.
    Independent writing
    Complete for homework. Peer editing on Tuesday.
    Tuesday, Jan. 5, 2010: M.O. Students will be able to peer edit Chapter 8 using a class generated rubric.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, journal time.
    Final Journal due Wed., Jan 13 (need 14 entries)
    Peer editing
    Revision of Chapter 8. Be sure to include at least one quotation from a peer. More quotations will empower your paper.

    Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2010: M.O. Students will be able to work independently on editing their Chapters 1-8 and putting together the illustrations for each chapter.
    AGENDA:
    SSR (15 minutes), journal time (15 minutes).
    Final Journal due Wed., Jan 13 (need 14 entries)
    Independent work on Senior Memory Album, which is due on Friday.
    HMWK: Bring bibliography information for final check on Thursday.

    Thursday, Jan. 7, 2010: M.O. Students will be able to use a checkoff list and rubric to complete their Annotated Bibliography for their Senior Memory Albums.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, journal time.
    Final Journal due Wed., Jan 13 (need 14 entries)
    Annotated Bibliography checkoff.
    In-line citation explanation.
    In-line citations to be added to at least 4 chapters.
    Independent work to finalize chapters.
    Final Senior Memory Album due Frday

    Friday, Jan. 8, 2010: M.O. Students will be able to share their Senior Memory Albums with their peers.
    AGENDA:
    SSR (15 minutes), journal time (15 minutes).
    Final Journal due Wed., Jan 13 (need 14 entries)
    Sharing time
    Weekend off if Memory album completed. :-) :-) :-)


    Monday, Jan. 11, 2010: M.O. Students will be able to share their Senior Memory Albums with their peers and write their Epilogue.
    AGENDA:
    SSR (15 minutes), journal time (15 minutes).
    Final Journal due Wed., Jan 13 (need 14 entries)
    Sharing time.
    Epilogue question: “If I Could Live My Life Over Again, I would...” or “Why I Would Not Change Anything about My Life” Write a thoughtful, reflective essay independently.
    Senior memory albums due TODAY. 50 points off per day late. No excuses accepted as per class agreement, unless you're in the hospital. :-)
    HMWK: Take the Literature Terminology quiz online until you are satisfired with the grade. This must be completed by Friday.


    Tuesday, Jan. 12 2010: M.O. Students will be able to peer edit the epilogue to the Senior memory album and revise for final grade.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, journal time.
    Final Journal due Wed., Jan 13 (need 14 entries) These need to be at least a quarter to a half page in length each.
    Peer editing, independent revising; Journal revising.


    Wednesday, Jan. 13, 2010: M.O. Students will be able to complete their Journal and appraise their peers' emtries using a class generated rubric.
    AGENDA:
    SSR (15 minutes).
    Final Journal due Today (need 14 entries of at least a 1/4 - 1/2 page in length each)

    HMWK:

    Thursday, Jan. 14, 2010: M.O. Students will be able to identify four types of essays and write a thesis statement for each one.
    AGENDA:
    SSR
    Essay Definitions; check out http://essayinfo.com/essays/ for more information.

      Expository Essay:
      Expository essays advance ideas, but are not argumentative. They may contain narrative elements (ex: anecdote), but usually focus on explaining something to the reader. They put forth some idea or insight into the reading that needs to be better understood.

      Narrative Essay:
      Narrative essays are midway between the argumentative essay and the speculative essay. They can include stories, a single incident, and are almost always autobiographical. The idea is primary!

      Argumentative/Persuasive Essay:
      Argumentative essays make their claim directly and explicitly. Point blank: they persuade! They share a basic area of concern: to establish a point by providing evidence to support it. The support may include examples, analogies, facts, statistics, ancedote, and evidence. Both counterviews and counterarguments may be presented by using a pro/con structure or debate style.

      Speculative Essay:
      Speculative essays explore an idea, perception, or feeling. The tone of the essay is typically less authoritative and less insistent than that of an espository or argumentative essay. Usually the writer will use a less structured orgaization and will explore arguments, not advance them. This type of essay does not have a single, clear-cut thesis.

    In small groups research one of the four essays and create a presentation that will teach the purpose of the essay; give examples of this type of essay, and highlight thesis statements from outstanding essays. Handouts would be a good thing to offer during the presentation.


    Friday, Jan. 15, 2010: M.O. Students will be able to present their assigned essay type with explanations in a clear manner, so students will understand how to write a thesis for that essay.
    AGENDA:
    SSR (15 minutes), presentations. "Literature Terminology" Quiz completed by today.

    HMWK: Write a thesis statement for two of the types of essays presented in class.

    Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2010: M.O. Students will be able to critique thesis statements from expositive, narrative, argumentative, and speculative essays using a class generated check-off list.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, Vocab lesson, Create own Vocab. test, paired critique; Independent work: write a thesis statement for the two essays not yet chosen.

    Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2010: M.O. Students will be able to complete their Post-Test with an increase in grade.
    AGENDA:
    SSR (15 minutes). Vocab peer test. Complete essay assignment if not done (those absent on Friday), Begin review for final.

    Thursday, Jan. 21, 2010: M.O. Students will be able to take notes for the final.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, Final Review, Catch-up

    Friday, Jan. 22, 2010: M.O. Students will be able to take a Final Exam and pass it with at least 60% accuracy.
    Return work
    EXAM


    Monday, Jan. 25, 2010: Off Exam Day

    Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2010: Return Exam Day: Final day of first semester.

    Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2010: Professional Development Day for Teachers. No school for students.

    EXTRAS:


    Beowulf Unit:
    Homework:
    Textbook - do Review on page 9 re Anglo-Saxon period.
    Read "Literary Elements" on page 30. Bring to class on Tuesday a favorite song (CD or IPOD) that has a specific "beat."
    Define "scops," "caesura," "alliteration," "allusion," and "kennings" in your notebook in the section marked "DEFINITIONS." (textbook or online)
    Read assigned chapters for Beowulf.


    Tuesday: M.O. Students will be able to add to their knowledge of Beowulf by sharing their research with their peers and taking notes.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary and journal time, essay topic discussion, Discuss Beowulf, handouts (FCAs, "Janitor's Lessons," "Two Sodas," Syllabus FAQs, "Why Read Beowulf?")
    Homework: Read assigned chapters for Beowulf. Highlight the Beowulf handout and the "Janitor's Lessons."


    Wednesday: M.O. Students will be able to write a poem using alliteration and kennings.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary and journal time. Address a poem to a favorite coach, teacher, adult, or mentor and use alliteration and keenings. Use the computer and check out if you decide to use rhyming. Share with your small group.
    Go over highlighting worksheets.
    Discuss Beowulf. Add to the list of characteristics re Beowulf and Grendel's mother.
    Homework: *Pretend you're Beowulf and write your own version of a mighty battle or struggle you have to fight. Remember, a conflict or struggle is the core of narrative or storytelling. Use lots of descriptions, but please don't make it sickeningly graphic. Length = 300+ words.
    *Choose a topic for an essay (college if not done already) for Thursday. Read pages 1097-1099 about developing answers for a question. Take notes!
    Beowulf Chapters 11-13


    Read chapters 14-16 of Beowulf.

    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary and journal time. Narrative writing time.
    Beowulf. In pairs, draw a cartoon for Beowulf's adventure with the Firedrake. Be sure to use his physical characteristics and use the emotional characteristics within the dialogue of the story.
    Homework: Finish cartoon, study for Beowulf. test on Wednesday, and complete narrative if not done. turn in on Tuesday.
    Tuesday: M.O. Students will be able to take notes for the Beowulf test and find three good quotes, which they will compile on a 3" x 5" card to be used for the test.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary and journal time. Turn in completed Narrative. Beowulf test review. Essay continuation.
    Homework: Study for Beowulf test.
    ESSAY Unit:
    Thursday: M.O. Students will be able to write the first paragraph of a five paragraph essay using a thesis statement and three examples.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary and journal time. Essay disucssion and writing time. List of items to edit on easel. Peer edit exaggeration story.
    Homework: Edit your first paragraph and then write the second paragraph of your essay.
    Friday: M.O. Students will be able to write the second paragraph of their essay using their first topic sentence with details to support it.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary and journal time (Obama's Inaugural speech, Maya Angelou's interview). SAT Kaplan Vocab Quiz II. Essay disucssion and writing time. Beowulf.


    Monday: M.O. Students will be able to rewrite their narrative using appropriate dialogue and correcting their story.

    Wednesday: M.O. Students will be able to write the third and fourth paragraphs of their essay using topic sentences and supporting details.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary and journal time.
    Beowulf test. If time, continuation of the essay topic.
    Homework: Work on essay.

    Thursday: M.O. Students will be able to take an online vocabulary quiz using prior studying from the activities.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary and journal time.
    Vocab Quiz: Sat Vocab III.
    Peer editing
    Rewrite third and fourth paragraphs. Finish for homework if not completed in class.
    Friday: M.O. Students will be able to peer edit the third and fourth paragraphs of their partner's essay using a class generated list of items to look for.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary and journal time.
    Department essay.
    Peer-editing of class essay. Rewrite. Work on final paragraph.

    Happy Vacation


    Monday: M.O. Students will be able to peer edit their partner's completed class essay, including constructive criticism and suggestions.

    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary and journal time.
    *Vocab IV discussion (quiz on Thursday), *Beowulf make-up test after school mandatory, *discussion of Medieval Period (1066-1485) pages 43-54, *final peer edit of complete essay, *individual essay work, Stonehenge handout to be highlighted for next class.
    and Maya Angelou handout: "How Poor Were You?"
    CHAUCER Unit:
    Homework: Complete essay if not finished in class. Due Tuesday.
    Read pages 55-56 on Chaucer and "The Prologue to the Canterbury Tales" on pages 57-59. Note that pages 58 and 59 are the same thing, only translated. Highlight the main points on sticky note/s. Then read the "Focus on Narrative Writing" on page 80 and actually write a description (character traits) of a special family member. Remember to show not tell.

    Tuesday: M.O. Using a bulleted list, students will be able to describe one of the pilgrims in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary and journal time.
    Go over Beowulf test.
    Vocabulary for Chaucer's Canterbury Tales
    Include these words in your definitions: prologue, Magna Carta, chivalry, palmers, martyr, dirk, span, hurdy-gurdy (find a picture and include it), fee-simple, stave, tithes, excommunication, and epicurean.
    Make a bulleted list of all the physical and emotional character traits for your assigned pilgrim. Be ready to share on Wed.
    Reading of first tale. Notes should be taken. We will be going over these tales from Canterbury Tales "The Pardoner's Tale" pg. 81-87 (textbook), "The Miller's Tale" pg. 86-102 (Selected Canterbury Tales), or "The Tale of the Wife of Bath" pg. 125-135 (Selected Canterbury Tales).

    Homework: Find a translated tale online and summarize it. You may want to print it out. Do not use the ones listed here that will be discussed in class. Either write down or underline the similes, metaphors, or alliterations on two pages of your tale. Be sure to mark which is which.
    OR: Choose a tale and retell it in language an elementary school child could understand. Use the Internet if you are having trouble. There are plenty of translations available for downloading.

    Wednesday: M.O. Students will be able to create a character going on a modern-day pilgrimmage by developing an outline of the character and the place.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary and journal time.
    Reading of second and third tales. Notes should be taken.
    Sharing of Chaucer's pilgrim descriptions. Notes MUST be taken.
    If time, students will orally share special family member description and "found" tale.
    Character development: A writer develops a character in many ways including: a)showing the character acting and speaking; b) physical description; c) revealing the character's thoughts; d) revealing what other characters think about the character; and/or e) by commenting directly on the character. Make up one character who is going on a pilgrimage (religious or fun). You decide where the pilgrimmage is located. Be ready to present your creative character tomorrow.
    Homework: complete pilgrim description and place. Vocab IV quiz on Thursday.

    Thursday: M.O. Students will be able to share character and pilgrimage descriptions orally within large groups.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary and journal time.
    Vocabulary Quiz.
    Continuation of sharing re pilgrims and invented characters.

    Friday: M.O.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary and journal time.
    Essays returned and discussed.


    Monday equals a snow day. Enjoy the time off!

    Tuesday: M.O. Students will be able to share character/pilgrimage descriptions orally and compile a list of special characteristics for a class pilgrim.

    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary (V) and journal time.
    Canterbury Tales test on Friday.
    Don't forget to turn in rewritten essays for up to 200 more points!
    Vocab V discussion (quiz on Thursday), share personal characteristics, continue with Chaucer pilgrim characteristics, share "found" Chaucer tales with small groups.
    Homework: Your choice of two items: 1) Write a list of items that shows how Chaucer's tales give today's reader a window into the fourteenth century and earlier. Use class discussion, online research, and your textbook (pages 55-87) as sources for this assignment. OR 2) Think about how Chaucer epitomizes the overall questions of this unit. (How does one generation see another? How does the older generation affect those who come after? What are the responsibilities of the younger generation to the older generation). Make a detailed bulleted list for each question including citations. Be ready to discuss in class.


    Wednesday: M.O. Students will be able to relate the Tale to the Pilgrim in a brief essay. (Chaucer's Canterbury Tales)
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary and journal time.
    Vivid verbs! Lines 4, 17, 35, 71, 74, 212, and 222 on pages 82-87. Dull vs. vivid...why does a reader care? Discuss in class.
    Students will chose a tale and in an extended revelation, portray the pilgrim telling the tale with the pilgrim's tale. (Compare the pilgrim's characteristics to the moral of the tale.) This should be a brief essay, but spelling and facts should be checked. Final draft shoukld be typed on the computer. Have a classmate edit it before typing the final version to help with organization, vocabulary, and mechanics. Set up a thesis including the examples you will use in the body. Choose a tale you understand!

    Homework: Finish brief essay and study for vocabulary test

    Thursday: M.O. Students will be able to share pilgrim vs tale comparisons.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary, and journal time.
    Vocabulary Quiz (SAT V).
    Continuation of sharing re pilgrims and invented characters.
    Review for Canterbury test on Friday.

    Friday: M.O. Students will be able to take a test on Canterbury Tales online using only one notecard.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary and journal time.
    Canterbury Tales test.


    Ballad Unit:
    Monday: M.O. Students will be able to recognize a ballad's literary elements by finding a current piece of music with at least five of these elements and sharing it with the class.

    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary and journal time, I-search Introduction, Ballads.
    Ballads: 1. Read page 105 about early English and Scottish ballads.
    2. Read "Sir Patrick Spens" (pg 106),"Bonnie George Campbell" (pg 107), "Bonny Barbara Allen" (pg 108), and "Get Up and Bar the Door" (pg 109). Complete assigned questions depending on your group. Be ready to discuss their form (stanza, rhyme, meter).
    Make a list of all the literary elements found in a ballad.
    Research the web for current songs with the elements of ballads.
    Find one "old" ballad online and print out the verses. Share tomorrow.


    Ballads:(pg. 105-110)


    Ballads

    * Ballads (fifteenth century)
    * From traditions and everyday life of common people
    * Most popular themes: disappointed love, jealousy, revenge, sudden disaster, and daring deeds
    * Simple and direct narrative
    * Storyline developed largely through dialogue
    * Hinted narrative: little detail
    * "Refrain" or "incremental repetition" often used
    * Musical in nature; meant to be sung
    * Passed on by word of mouth
    * Impossible to trace original authors
    * Not printed until the eighteenth century

    Tuesday: M.O. Students will be able to share ballads orally and identify the literary elements in each through oral discussion.

    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary (V) and journal time, Sharing, I-Search.
    * Share songs with ballad elements in small groups.
    * I-Search paper
    * Write a short dialogue of a quarrel you heard recently. This can be from a personal experience, or from a fictional one (television, movie).

    Wednesday: M.O. Students will be able to interpret assigned ballads from text in small groups and share orally with the entire class. (Canterbury Tales test makeup today only)
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary and journal time.
    * Share ballads * Work on I Search Album

    Thursday: M.O. Students will be able to write a reply to orally analyze their peer's ballads using ballad literary techniques.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary, and journal time.
    *Vocabulary Quiz (SAT V).
    *Presentations

    Senior Memory Albums: I-Search Projects:
    Friday: M.O. Students will be able to find and assess appropriate web sites for their I-Search Chapter 1 project.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary and journal time.
    * I-Search Independent time, proofed and typed Chapter 1 due Monday. Check the rubric for point spread. Don't forget the Family Tree.

    Friday: M.O. Students will be able to create a memory with one parent for their I-Search Chapter 2 project.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary and journal time.
    *Finish presentations from Thursday.
    *Handouts of "Tradition" and "Mimi."
    *I-Search work
    Chapter 2 due next Tuesday. Have RD done for peer edit on Monday.
    Friday: M.O. Students will be able to write a detailed story with quotations/dialogue after interviewing a family member about a past event.
    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary and journal time.
    *Work on Chapter 3 (Family Lore) of I-Search independently.
    Rough draft for Monday's peer edits.




    March 30, 2009 Monday: M.O. Students will be able to peer edit Chapter 3 using a class generated list and correcting their peer's papers.

    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary (IX) and journal time.
    *Peer-edit (include constructive criticism + state at least one thing you liked), revision independently re I-search.
    Poetry:
    Marlowe and Raleigh, A.E. Housman, Sonnets
    March 15, 2009 Monday: M.O. Students will be able to respond to "The Nymph's Reply to the Shepherd" and then respond to that response in gender based groups.

    AGENDA:
    SSR, vocabulary and journal time, I-search, Marlowe/Raleigh.
    * Read page 161 re Marlowe (1564-1593) and Raleigh (1552-1618). *Read page 163 re "The Mystery of Marlowe's Death."
    * Read "The Passionate Shepherd to His Love" (pg 162) by Christopher Marlowe and "The Nymph's Reply to the Shepherd" (pg 162) by Sir Walter Raleigh. *Classroom assignment in gender groups.

*I search time re bibliography. Chapter 1 due!
Tuesday: M.O. Students will be able to write open ended questions for the two interviews needed for Chapter 2 of their I-search project.

AGENDA:
SSR, vocabulary (V) and journal time, I-Search.


Wednesday: M.O. Students will be able to explain in a Type 2 how satire is used in a "mock persuasion" piece of literature, i.e. "A Modest Proposal."
AGENDA:
SSR, vocabulary and journal time.
*Finish Marlowe/Raleigh 'Nymph" replies.

*A. E. Housman. Read pg. 663 and pg. 666 "From A letter to maurice Pollet." Find a poem from A Shropshire Lad and bring it in to read to the class. Who was the Shropshire lad according to Housman?
*Read pg. 664-665 and identify the symbolism in all four poems. What syllabic pattern does each poem follow? Take the lines/phrases you chose and write your own poem using one of the patterns identified.


Wednesday: M.O. Students will be able to identify the rhyme scheme in a sonnet and then write a sonnet in pairs.
AGENDA:
SSR, vocabulary and journal time.
*Turn in Short story Quiz.
* Read pgs. 152-153 (The Sonnet), 669 (Elizabeth Barrett Browning), 156 (Edmund Spenser), and 166-169 (William Shakespeare).
*Explain the difference among Italian (Petrarchan), English (Shakespearean), and Spenserian sonnets.
*Write a 14 line sonnet with a partner in Shakespearean rhyme scheme. (ababcdcdefef gg)
*Hmwk. if not finished in class: Find a sonnet online and mark the appropriate rhyme scheme. Class discussion on Thursday.
*Vocabulary quiz VIII on Thursday


Thursday: M.O. Students will be able to create a class generated list of attributes for a sonnet.
AGENDA:
SSR, vocabulary, and journal time.
*Vocabulary Quiz (SAT VII).
*Read homework sonnets and confirm rhyme scheme.
*Read class-made sonnets, confirm rhyme scheme.
*Class generated list of sonnet attributes.
* What is the rhyme scheme for Shakespeare's Sonnet 116 on page 168?
*Homework: Bring I-Search information for class independent work. Ask family members questions, so you can write up the stories in class on Friday. Stories may be written in first-person (your viewpoint) or third person (their viewpoint).


Short Stories:
"A Modest Proposal," "Araby, "Dead Men's Path," "Excerpt from Pride and Prejudice"
*Turn in Teenink essay choice, summary of pg. 163, and Chapter 1.
* Read (page 382) Jonathan Swift's "A Modest Proposal." Explain the irony and satire used by Jonathan Swift. Define cannibalism and research two examples of when it happened in America.
*Group 1: Read James Joyces's "Araby" (page 844).
*Group 2: Read Chinua Achebe's "Dead Men's Path" (page 920).br> Homework: Finish whatever you didn't complete in class and work on Chapter 2 of the I-search project.

Thursday: M.O. Students will be able to present their story and the conclusions drawn from the reading and the assignment to the class.
AGENDA:
SSR, vocabulary, and journal time.
*Vocabulary Quiz (SAT VII).
*Presentations
Everyone: Assignments:
pg. 389 Do "Focus on Persuasive Writing"
*Group 1: James Joyces's "Araby" (page 844). Do the Reading Check on page 847. Trace the images of light and dark throughout the story. How do they define the boy's feelings? In small groups look at pg. 848 and read the "Commentary." Do Question 1a,b,c. Share your knowledge with the rest of the class.
*Group 2: Read Chinua Achebe's "Dead Men's Path" (page 920). Do the Reading Check on page 922. In a short essay explain who is more tolerant, Mr. Obi or the village priest? Back up your statements with quotes from the text. In small groups look at pg. 922 and do questions 2, 4, 5 together. Type up and turn in with everyone's names. Share your knowledge with the rest of the class.


March 23, 2009 Monday: M.O. Students will be able to peer edit Chapter 2 using a class generated list.

AGENDA:
SSR, vocabulary and journal time.
Peer-edit, revision independently re I-search.
Quiz on "Dead Men's Path," "Araby," and "A Modest Proposal" due Wednesday.
Chapter 2 due Tuesday
SAT Vocab VIII quiz on Thursday


Tuesday: M.O. Students will be able to point out symbolism in A. E. Housman's poetry by making a class list.

AGENDA:
SSR, vocabulary (V) and journal time.
Turn in Chapter 2
Short story quiz due Wednesday. No exceptions. E-mail it if you're not going to be in class.

*Read Pg. 521 about Jane Austen. List five important details about her in your notebook including birth/death dates.
*Read the selection "From Pride and Prejudice" by Jane Austen (pg. 522-525), Do the Reading Check on pg 525 and Ques. #2 under For Study and Literature.
HMWK: Complete Chapter 3. Due Tuesday, no exceptions.

Tuesday: M.O. Students will be able to analyze Jane Austen's characters by their mode of speech by comparing the speechs of Collins and Elizabeth in a compare and contrast list.

AGENDA:
SSR, Vocabulary (IX) and journal time.
*Turn in Chapter 3.
*In small groups complete an analysis of speech patterns and as a group list three conclusions. Then explain how this piece of writing is another example of satire. be ready to present your conclusions.
*Read Pg. 837 about Virginia Woolf. List five important details about her in your notebook including birth/death dates.
*HMWK: Work on Chapter 4.

Wednesday: M.O. Students will be able to write a thesis statement about the role of women in society today compared to Shakespeare's time according to Woolf, using notes taken from group work, their readings, and their own experience.
AGENDA:
SSR, vocabulary and journal time.
*In pairs read the excerpt from "A Room of One's Own" orally (pg. 839-841), and then in foursomes discuss possible scenarios for the young girl other than the one she took. Explain whether this could happen today.
*Independently complete the Reading Check on pg. 841.
*Complete the "Focus on Expository Writing" (pg. 841). Expand your classroom notes for the list of how women's role in society has changed. Then write a one-sentence thesis statement.
*HMWK: Quiz Sat vocab IX
*HMWK: Work on Chapter 4.

Thursday: M.O. Students will be able to explain the symbolism of the rocking horse in D. H. Lawrence's "The Rocking Horse Winner" by listing three quotes from the text and explaining each one.
AGENDA:
SSR, vocabulary, and journal time.
*Vocabulary Quiz (SAT IX).
*Read pg. 851 about D. H. Lawrence. List five important details about him in your notebook including birth/death dates.
*Read D. H. Lawrence's "The Rocking Horse Winner" (pg. 852-861).
*Find three quotes from the text to explain the symbolism of the rocking horse. Explain your choices.
*HMWK: Define "motif." Explain how Lawrence uses it in his story. List one example of this found in fairy tales or in movies. Explain your choice.
*HMWK: Bring I-Search information for class independent work. Follow the prompt questions for Chapter 4. Ask questions of parents, family members, family friends, etc before beginning to write. Take notes and be sure to answer as many of the questions plus others you think of in your essay.

Friday: M.O. Students will be able to write a detailed 2 plus page story with quotations/dialogue about their first years after interviewing parents, family members, friends, etc.
AGENDA:
SSR, vocabulary and journal time.
*Turn in homework re "motif." Discuss.
*Work on Chapter 4 ("Suddenly, I Became Me!") of I-Search independently.
Rough draft for Monday's peer edits.
*HMWK: Finish rough draft of Chapter 4.


April 6, 2009 Monday: M.O. Students will be able to peer edit Chapter 4 using a class generated list and include one piece of constructive criticism and one complimentary comment.

AGENDA:
SSR, vocabulary (V is for Victory) and journal time.
*Peer-edit (include constructive criticism + state at least one thing you liked), revision independently re I-search.
*Begin Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
Using the Internet, write a one page paper on Shelley.
Read pages 1-6

Tuesday: M.O. Students will be able to discuss Mary Shelley's life and formulate questions as a group about her novel based on the "dare," then choose at least three each to answer after completing the reading.


AGENDA:
SSR, Vocabulary ("V is for Victory") and journal time.
*Turn in Chapter 4.
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
*Assigned reading: pages 7-14

Wednesday: M.O. Students will be able to find and list quotes (golden nuggets) from the readings to explain each of the characters.
AGENDA:
SSR, vocabulary and journal time.
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
*Assigned reading: Chapters 1-2 (pgs. 14-23)
*Quotations from readings
*HMWK: Practice for "V is for Victory" vocabulary quiz.
*HMWK: Bring in material for Chapters 1-4 for revision and organization

Thursday: M.O. Students will be able to revise their I-Search projects as they organize the chapters into an album.
AGENDA:
SSR, vocabulary, and journal time.
*Vocabulary Quiz (SAT "V is for Victory").
*I-Search revision/organization
*Peer editing
*Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, Assigned reading: Chapters 3 (pgs 23-29)

HAPPY EASTER


Week of April 13, 2009 *Frankenstein by Mary Shelley (bring novel daily)
*Work on Chapter 5 of I-Search in class

April 13, 2009 Monday: M.O. Students will be able to complete Literary Circles for Chapters 2 and 3 and turn in a final typed copy.
AGENDA:
*SSR and journal time.
*Literary Circles: independent work re Frankenstein
*Vocabulary: First half of the Princeton "50" list. Study using my "Activities." Quiz on Thursday.

*Literary Circles: group re Frankenstein:
Scribe: Describe the plot in a descriptive detailed paragraph.
Linguist Expert: Find ten words you don't know and define them.
Artist and Timer: Draw a picture depicting an important event in the chapter and keep your group on time.
Golden Nugget Champ: Find three golden nuggets that best elucidate the chapter.
Character Virtuoso: Add at least two items to the bulleted list for each character represented in the chapter.
*Turn in a final neat version of your group's work with everyone's names on it.
*Go to http://www.expertvillage.com/video/94927_speech-words-vocabulary.htm and listen to the vocabulary video in groups of 2-3. Take notes and highlight the three most important points. Turn this in with all names on the one page.
*HMWK: Bring in information to begin writing Chapter 5 "School Bells" for Tuesday. Concentrate on Kindergarten through Grade 4.
*HMWK: Frankenstein by Mary Shelley:
Read Chapters 4-5 (pgs. 29-46) for Wednesday.

Tuesday: M.O. Students will be able to begin writing a rough draft for the first half of Chapter 5 of their I-Search project.

AGENDA:
SSR and journal time.
*Begin writing Chapter 5.
*Peer edit work completed
*HMWK: Frankenstein by Mary Shelley:
Don't forget to read Chapters 4-5 (pgs. 29-40) for Wednesday.

Wednesday: M.O. M.O. Students will be able to participate in and complete Literary Circles for Chapters 4 and 5 and turn in a final typed copy.
AGENDA:
SSR and journal time.
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
*Assigned reading for Thursday: Frankenstein by Mary Shelley: Chapter 6 (pgs. 40-46)

Thursday: M.O. Students will be able to begin writing a rough draft for the second half of Chapter 5 of their I-Search project.
AGENDA:
SSR and journal time.
*First half of the Princeton "50" list quiz.
*Begin writing Chapter 5 second half.
*Peer edit work completed
*HMWK: Frankenstein by Mary Shelley:
Read Chapter 7 (pgs. 46-54) for Friday.

Friday: M.O. Students will be able to continue writing the rough draft for all of Chapter 5 of their I-Search project.
AGENDA:
SSR and journal time.
*Complete writing the rough draft for Chapter 5.
*Peer edit work completed.
*HMWK: Final for Chapter 5 due Tuesday, April 28
*HMWK: Frankenstein by Mary Shelley:
Read Chapters 8-10 (pgs. 54-70) for Monday, April 27.


Hope everyone had a great vacation!


April 27, 2009 Monday: M.O. Students will be able to proof (Peer-edit) their peer's Chapter 5 essays using a class generated list of items, which include FCAs.
AGENDA:
*SSR and journal time.
*Vocab: Princeton "50" list, part II. Quiz on Thursday.
*Proofing Chapter 5. Final due Tuesday.
*Lit. circles from April 17 re Chapter 6/7 due.
*Read Frankenstein, Chapter 11 (XI), pages 70-76, in preparation for Literary Circles on Tuesday (chapters 8-12).
HMWK: Read chapter 12 (XII), pages 77-81 for Tuesday.


Tuesday: M.O. Students will be able to participate in and complete Literary Circles, including the Scribe, Linguist, Artist, Golden Nugget Champion, and Character Virtuoso for Chapters 8 through 12 of Frankenstein, and then turn in one compiled final typed copy.
AGENDA:
*SSR and journal time.
*Chapter 5 of I-Search due today.
*Literary Circles for chapters 8-12 of Frankenstein.
HMWK: Read chapters 13 (XIII) through 15 (XV), pages 81-97 for Thursday.

Wednesday: M.O. Students will be able to begin writing a rough draft for Chapter 6 of their I-Search project using data gathering, discrimination, and analysis of information.
AGENDA:
SSR and journal time.
*Begin writing rough draft for Chapter 6.
*Spend last ten minutes proofing a peer's work.
*Closing
*HMWK: Be prepared for Literary Circles on Thursday. Make sure you have read through chapter 16 (XVI) or up to page 104.

Thursday: M.O. Students will be able to participate in and complete their assigned roles in Literary Circles, including the Scribe, Linguist, Artist, Golden Nugget Champion, and Character Virtuoso for Chapters 13 through 16 of Frankenstein, and then turn in one compiled final typed copy.
AGENDA:
*SSR and journal time.
*Princeton "50" list, part II. Quiz
*Literary Circles for chapters 13-16 of Frankenstein.
HMWK: *Read chapters 17 (XVII) through 21 (XXI), pages 104-136 for Monday. *Continue working on Chapter 6 of I-Search. RD due Monday for proofing. Class time on Friday to work on chapter 6.

Friday: M.O. Students will be able to continue writing, editing, and revising a rough draft for Chapter 6 of their I-Search project.
AGENDA:
SSR and journal time.
*Continue writing rough draft for Chapter 6.
*Spend last fifteen minutes proofing a peer's work.
*If chapter completed, read Frankenstein.
*Closing: homework reminder plus best ideas/memories re chapter 6.
*HMWK: Be prepared for Literary Circles on Tuesday. Make sure you have read through chapter 21 (XXI) or up to page 136.


May 4, 2009 Monday: M.O. Students will be able to proof (Peer-edit) their peer's Chapter 6 essays using a class generated list of items, constructive criticism, and a positive comment, which include FCAs.
AGENDA:
*SSR and journal time.
*Proofing Chapter 6. Final due Tuesday.
*Lit. circles from April 30 re Chapter 13-16 due.
*Make sure you've read Frankenstein, Chapter 17 (XVII) - 21 (XXI) in preparation for Literary Circles on Tuesday (chapters 17-21).
HMWK: Chapter 6 of I-Search for Tuesday.


Tuesday: M.O. Students will be able to participate in and complete Literary Circles, including the Scribe, Linguist, Artist, Golden Nugget Champion, and Character Virtuoso for Chapters 17 through 21 of Frankenstein, and then turn in one compiled final typed copy.
AGENDA:
*SSR and journal time.
*Chapter 6 of I-Search due today.
*Literary Circles for chapters 17-21 of Frankenstein.
HMWK: Read chapters 22 (XXII) through 23 (XXIII), pages 136-149 for Thursday.

Wednesday: M.O. Students will be able to begin writing a rough draft for Chapter 7 of their I-Search project using data gathering, discrimination, interview techniques, and analysis of information.
AGENDA:
SSR and journal time.
*Begin writing rough draft for Chapter 7.
*Spend last ten minutes proofing a peer's work.
*Closing
*HMWK: Be prepared for Literary Circles on Thursday. Make sure you have read through chapter 22 - 23.

Thursday: M.O. Students will be able to participate in and complete their assigned roles in Literary Circles, including the Scribe, Linguist, Artist, Golden Nugget Champion, and Character Virtuoso for Chapters 22 through 23 of Frankenstein, and then turn in one compiled final typed copy.
AGENDA:
*SSR and journal time.
*Literary Circles for chapters 22-23 of Frankenstein.
HMWK: *Read final chapter 24 (XIV) pages 149-166 for Monday. *Continue working on Chapter 7 of I-Search. RD due Monday for proofing. Class time on Friday to work on chapter 7.

Friday: M.O. Students will be able to continue writing, editing, and revising a rough draft for Chapter 7 of their I-Search project.
AGENDA:
SSR and journal time.
*Continue writing rough draft for Chapter 7.
*Spend last fifteen minutes proofing a peer's work.
*If chapter completed, read final chapter of Frankenstein.
*Closing: homework reminder plus best ideas/memories re chapter 7.
*HMWK: Be prepared for Literary Circles on Tuesday. Make sure you have read through chapter 24 (XXIV) or up to last page 166.

May 11, 2009 Monday: M.O. Students will be able to proof (Peer-edit) their peer's Chapter 7 essays using a class generated list of items, constructive criticism, and a positive comment, which include FCAs.
AGENDA:
*SSR and Vocabulary building time ().
*Proof Chapter 7. Final due Tuesday.
*Edit peer-editing.
*Listen to audio CD of introduction, and Chapter 1 to Frankenstein CD.
*Lit. circles from May 3 re Chapter 22-23 overdue, unless group members absent.
HMWK: *Be sure you have finished Frankenstein. Tuesday will be a group discussion of the entire novel.
*Chapter 7 due.


Tuesday: M.O. Students will be able to participate in a large discussion group about Frankenstein, and its final chapter, and begin writing a final chapter for the novel.
AGENDA:
*SSR and Vocabulary building time ().
*Listen to final chapter of audio CD re Frankenstein.
*Class discussion of Frankenstein.
*Begin writing a final chapter for the novel. Due at the end of class on Wed.
*Frankenstein take-home final available online. It's due Monday, May 18. There are two essy questions included. Complete only one, but write a full essay including cited material from the novel.
Example of a cited reference to back up a statement: The monster's joy in learning was obvious as he covertly watched the cottagers. In chapter VI his thoughts show how his education was unfolding. "Night quickly shut in: but to my extreme wonder, I found that the cottagers had a means of prolonging light by the use of tapers, and was delighted to find that the setting of the sun did not put an end to the pleasure I experienced in watching my human neighbours" (Shelley 76).


Wednesday: M.O. Students will complete a final typed chapter for Frankenstein
Agenda:
SSR and Vocabulary building time ().
*Discuss the following questions/thoughts, then complete final typed chapter for Frankenstein. 1. How does Shelley's novel impact today's genetics and the arguments surrounding creation? 2. What warnings in the novel might today's generation consider? 3. How is Frankenstein like the god Prometheus (god who stole fire)? 4. Should mankind ignore potential hazards for the good of everyone? 5. Would people today react the same way to the monster as those from Frankenstein's generation? Why or why not? 6. What do you think the monster really wants from his creator? 7. Describe the father-child relationship between Frankenstein and the monster.
*Spend ten minutes proofing a peer's work on their computer using highlighting.
*Print out this version and then a corrected version and turn both in.
*Closing: Go over Thursday and Friday's assignments.
*HMWK:*Bring materials to work on Chapter 8 for Thursday and Friday.
*Don't forget Take-home online test due May 18.

Thursday and Friday, May 14-15: M.O. Students will be able to write a rough draft for Chapter 8 of their I-Search project using data gathering, discrimination, interview techniques, details, and analysis of information.
AGENDA:
*SSR (15 minutes) and Vocabulary building time (10 minutes) (freerice.com).
Thursday: *Independent work on Chapter 8.
Grades close officially on Friday (mine closed Wed.), so all work must be in. No exceptions.
Final 10 minutes: Discuss high points of senior year from writing.
Friday: Continue independent work on Chapter 8 until half way through the block, then proof a peer's work on their computer using hilighting.
Students will then edit and add to their Chapter 8.
HMWK: *Frankenstein online take-home final due Monday (Do only one essay question). See Mrs. Currier if you need a copy of this test.
*Rough draft of Chapter 8 due for peer-proofing on Monday.


May 18, 2009 Monday: M.O. Students will be able to proof (Peer-edit) their peer's Chapter 8 essays using a class generated list of items, constructive criticism, and a positive comment, which include FCAs.
AGENDA:
*SSR and Vocabulary building time (freerice.com).
*Online take-home test on Frankenstein due by today.
*Department essay
*Proof Chapter 8. Final due Tuesday.
*Edit peer-editing.


Tuesday: M.O. Students will be able to share their final chapters for the novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley.
AGENDA:
*SSR and Vocabulary building time (freerice.com).
*Oral reading of final chapters.
*Closing
HMWK: Bring textbook on Wed. We begin Macbeth.
Wednesday: M.O. Students will research the Globe Theater and complete a collage of the different stages of it over time.
Agenda:
SSR and Vocabulary building time ().
Macbeth introduction
Read pages 174-177 in textbook.
Find at least four pictures of the Globe Theater at different stages of its completion or during different eras online, copy and paste them to a Word document collage-style, including captions and attributions.
Browse the five sites listed under links on Shakespeare (Look for the *). Take a full page of computer generated notes and attribute them to whichever site you read. You must have at least three of the sites listed in your notes. You do not have to have complete sentences, bullets for certain parts are fine. This is due Thursday.
HMWK *Read the first two scenes in Macbeth pages 179-181 for Friday
*Bring any materials you will need for the Epilogue. Thursday will be an independent work day.
Thursday: M.O. Students will be able to review their I-Search project and write at least a two page Epilogue while answering the questions on the Introduction page completely.
AGENDA:
*SSR and journal time.
*Independent work on Epilogue.
HMWK Bring in a binder and your eight chapters for Friday's class.
Friday: M.O. Students will be able to describe the three witches in Macbeth after researching paintings of them online and reading Act I, Scene 3.
AGENDA:
*SSR and journal time.
Read Act I, Scene 3 of Macbeth orally. (pages 182-187)
In a short essay, describe the three witches as seen in famous paintings you've found online. Cite the sources and copy and paste the pictures into your document.
Independent time to work on compiling your I-Search, which is due Tuesday.

May 26, 2009 Tuesday: M.O. Students will be able to work independently compiling their I-Search by revising their eight chapters, peer-editing their Epilogues, and adding illustrations.
AGENDA:
*SSR and Vocabulary building time (freerice.com).
Independent time for I-Search, which is due Tuesday.

HMWK: Bring textbook to class. Final on Thursday.

May 27, 2009 Wednesday: M.O. Students will be able to take notes during a review for their Final.
AGENDA:
*SSR and Vocabulary building time (freerice.com).
*Final review *I-Search due. Sharing time.

May 27, 2009 Thursday: M.O. Students will be able to pass their English IV final based on their skills.
AGENDA:
*FINAL *Happy Summer!

June 1, 2009, Monday:
Last class: return of finals. You're done! Breathe a sigh of relief! The end is in sight. Congratulations...You ALL are wonderful students and becoming tremendous people! I am very proud of your accomplishments. Please keep in touch. See you at graduation!
STOP*STOP*STOP*STOP*STOP*STOP*STOP*STOP*
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Generations Unit: Novel

    Novel: Angela' Ashes by Frank McCourt to be distributed.
    Read: Chapter I by Monday, pgs. 11-46.
    Chapter II by Friday pgs. 47-90.
    Chapter III by Monday pgs. 91-112.
    Chapter IV by Wed. pgs. 113-131.
    Chapter V by Friday pgs. 132-150.
    Chapter VI by Monday pgs. 151-170.
    Chapter VII by Wed. pgs. 170-186.
    Chapter VIII by Friday pgs. 187-215.
    Chapters IX and X by Monday pgs. 216-251.
    Chapters XI and XII by Wed. pgs. 252-283. ,br> Chapters XIII and XIV by Friday pgs. 284-308.
    Chapters XV-XVIII by Monday pgs. 309-362.

*************************

College Essay
*Choose three topics
*Brainstorm topics and outline possible ideas for the best two.
*In pairs, explain your idea and give feedback.
*Choose the best topic for your essay.
*Rough Draft due _________
*Peer edit RD including one piece of constructive criticism and one specific compliment
*Rewrite college essay
Final due ___________
(Typed/double spaced, creative title, spell and grammar checked, 375-500 words depending on college requirements, rough draft attached to the back including peer edit comments)
*************************

On Monday in class: Read (page 382) Jonathan Swift's "A Modest Proposal," (page 844) James Joyces's "Araby," and (page 920) Chinua Achebe's "Dead Men's Path" all in textbook.
Assignments:
pg. 389 Do "Focus on Persuasive Writing"; pg. 848 Read Commentary and do Question 1a,b,c; pg. 922 Do Questions 2, 4, 5.
Practice for 15 minutes daily on Vocabulary: Princeton Review Hit Parade (second half), (see link below) Test on Thursday Hint: Study definition to word.
Retakes on Vocabulary available after school within one week of quiz.
Don't forget to date and complete the two Journal entries per week.
Questions for Angela's Ashes
1. What role does God play in Frank's life?
2. What is the "dole"?
3. Summarize Chapter IV
4. Describe in detail Mr. O'Neill (VI).
**5. How do you think Frank feels about his mother? father?

Canterbury Tales test to be returned and discussed.
Hmwk: Angela's Ashes
Fri.:Department Essay #1

Week of Oct. 6
Kaplan Sat Vocab II test on Thursday
Angela's Ashes test on Friday; return book
Compile notes on Angela's Ashes for seven essay questions; study for Friday

Angela's Ashes Essay Study Questions

1. Why does Frank rarely blame his father for the suffering that his alcoholism inflicts upon the family? How does this lack of censure affect the moral tone of McCourt's memoir? Back up your statement with cited quotes from the memoir.
2. What role do women play in McCourt's memoir? Is it fair to describe their characterization as stereotypical? Back up your statement with cited quotes from the memoir.
3. What is Frank's relationship to Catholicism, and does this relationship change as the memoir progresses? Back up your statement with cited quotes from the memoir.
4. In what ways does McCourt use this infancy in New York to foreshadow his experiences in Limerick? Back up your statement with cited quotes from the memoir.
5. What role do Frank's and his friends' escapades play in establishing a sense of fun and vitality within the memoir? Back up your statement with cited quotes from the memoir.
6. What do you think McCourt's primary motivation was for wirintg his memoir? To earn the sympathy of his readers? To teach them something? Explain. Back up your statement with cited quotes from the memoir.
7. Does Frank's relationship with Ireland change during his childhood? If so, how does this affect his subsequent return to the United States? Back up your statement with cited quotes from the memoir.

Group work re Angela's Ashes


Research Paper: Thesis, collection of written notecards and highlighted Internet sources, and outline completed by Oct. 31

    Unit II Love and Loss
    Guiding Questions: What is love?
    What does it mean to love and be loved?
    How do we love ourselves?
    What types of loss can be expected in life?
    How do people deal with loss?
    How does growth proceed from loss?


    Sonnets: Browning, Sonnet #14 (pg. 669), Spencer, Sonnet #75 (pg 156), Shakespeare, Sonnet 116 (pg 168). Read and alalyze in class.
    Hmwk: Read pages 152-153 and make a bulleted list of what compiles a sonnet. Include another list as to the types of sonnets. Find examples of at least two different types of sonnets (Internet, books, magazines) and bring them in for sharing. Mark them appropriately.
    Oct. 31: Work on Outline re research paper/Inspiration. Come to class prepared.

    Sonnet
    14 lines
    10 syllables in each line
    Theme: unreachable love
    3 forms: Italian/Petrarchan, Spenserian, English/Shakespearian
    Basic meter: iambic pentameter (stressed and unstressed syllables)


    Italian Sonnet: 8 lines (octave) + 6 lines (sestet); abbaabba + cdcdcd or cddcdc or cdecde or cdeced or cdcedc
    Volta: means a change in subject matter - usually found in Italian sonnets with the "turn" into the sestet

    Spenserian Sonnet: invented by Edmund Spenser; rhyme scheme: a b a b b c b c c d c d e e ; famous for The Faerie Queene

    Shakespearian Sonnet: 4+4+4 (quatrain) +2 lines (couplet); rhyme scheme: a b a b c d c d e f e f g g.
    Vocabulary Kaplan SAT VI quiz on Friday. Activities already online.
    Nov. 6: Quarter ends: Journals due today.
    Final day to create research paper Outline using Inspiration. Be sure to come to class prepared to work. Students MUST turn in the Outline at the end of class.
    Bibliography Information: follow MLA style (see Online Writing Lab - Purdue link below for more information). Be sure to find the copyright date and sponsor for every Internet site. Do it as you find your sources, not later.
    Nov. 7: Textbook. Sonnets
    Read pages 162-163; answer ALL questions on page 163. Don't forget to read the "Literature and Politics" section on page 163. If not enough time in class, this is due on Monday.
    Homework: Work on research paper: first paragraph.

    Look-ahead: Macbeth begins in December
    Research paper due in early December.

    Ballads

    * Ballads (fifteenth century)
    * From traditions and everyday life of common people
    * Most popular themes: disappointed love, jealousy, revenge, sudden disaster, and daring deeds
    * Simple and direct narrative
    * Storyline developed largely through dialogue
    * Hinted narrative: little detail
    * "Refrain" or "incremental repetition" often used
    * Musical in nature; meant to be sung
    * Passed on by word of mouth
    * Impossible to trace original authors
    * Not printed until the eighteenth century

    1. Read page 105 about early English and Scottish ballads.
    2. Read "Sir Patrick Spens" (pg 106),"Bonnie George Campbell" (pg 107), "Bonny Barbara Allen" (pg 108), and "Get Up and Bar the Door" (pg 109). Complete assigned questions depending on your group. Group 4 should also find an example of a ballad. Bring it to class and be ready to discuss its form (stanza, rhyme, meter).<
    3. Read the "Literary Elements." br> 4. Write a short dialogue of a quarrel you heard recently. This can be from a personal experience, or from a fictional one (television, movie).
    5. Read page 161 re Marlowe (1564-1593) and Raleigh (1552-1618). Read page 163 re "The Mystery of Marlowe's Death."
    6. Read "The Passionate Shepherd to His Love" (pg 162) by Christopher Marlowe and "The Nymph's Reply to the Shepherd" (pg 162) by Sir Walter Raleigh. Classroom assignment in gender groups.

CONTINUE WORKING ON YOUR RESEARCH PAPER.


Continue checking out COLLEGES!
or
Begin, if you haven't already.
Call the Admissions Office for a "TOUR" Time!
Many colleges will allow you to stay overnight if you make an
appointment ahead of time. You are allowed "college" days. See your guidance counselor.

Register for the SATs.



Monday: Vocab/Journal/complete "Le Morte Darthur." (pg. 99-102) Do "Close Reading" in class. Finish group work re ballads.
Tuesday: Research Paper
Research Paper: inclass independent work on Wednesday and Thursday.
Quiz on Sonnets and ballads on Wed., Nov. 19
Vocab VII Quiz on Thursday, Nov. 20
Friday: Textbook

Monday-Friday: Work on research paper and Housman Essay (final paragraph should include a simple critique by a professional writer and a reference to one more of Housman's poems. Include a copy of the poem with the essay and RD due Dec. 8
Vocab VIII Quiz: Dec. 2

RESEARCH PAPER DUE Dec. 12
The final paper is worth 800 points
Include: Title page, Cover page, Table of Contents (subheadings, i.e Introduction), 10 page + paper, addendum (referenced within body of the paper) and bibliography (minimum of 8 sources, three not from the Internet. MLA format followed!).
* Be sure to bind it professionally and USE the rubric I gave earlier in the year and again on Tuesday, Dec. 9
* Page numbers belong at the center of the bottom of the page.
* Inline citations must correspond to the sources in the bibliography
* All pieces of the research paper must be turned in with the final paper. (notecards/notes, graded outline, graded bibliography, and two graded rough drafts (mine and the one one a peer proofed)
* REMEMBER: ANY quote or paraphrased quote or specific statistic must be cited!!!
* 80 points off per day late.
Vocab. IX Quiz: Dec. 11






    Essay 1
    That "all-important" college essay, SAT vocabulary, On The Beach or Snow Falling on Cedars, and short works from the literature textbook.

Independent Assignment:

Additional Assignments:
Writing Journal:
Choose three writing journal topics from the online list and write at least half a page or more for each.
Group work re contemporary ballads.

*************************

Week III

    Continuation and completion of previous textbook work.
    Final College Application Essay due.
    Second Vocab. test on second half of Princeton "50" list.
Additional Assignments:
Writing Journal:
Choose three writing journal topics from the online list and write at least half a page or more for each.



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Week IV and V

    Deadline to finish On the Beach/Snow Falling on Cedars will be the end of this week. Review will be completed. An essay and short answer test will be a few days later.
    Essay 2
    Lions' essay assigned.
    Write a five-paragraph plus essay using the assigned topic as your theme. The top essayists will present their essays to the Lions' Clubs (Attleboro Lions Club, South Attleboro Lions Club and the AHS Leo Club) in competition. AHS has had many winners in the past. Maybe you too will join this esteemed group!

    Unit II Generations
    Textbook Readings:

    "Rocking Horse Winner" Do a cause and effect chain
    "Dead Man's Path" Write an editorial evaluation.
    "Shooting an Elephant" Questions + oral defense of theme choice.
    "Ulysses" Fictional or nonfictional character monologue.
    "Spring and Fall..." Short essay glorifying autumn (Use colors and scents).


Additional Assignments
Writing Journal:
Choose three writing journal topics from the online list and write at least half a page or more for each.
*************************

Week VI
    Essay 3
    Veterans of Foreign Wars' essay contest (see http://www.vfw.org/index.cfm?fa=cmty.leveld&did=150) )
    2003-2004 Topic: "My Commitment to America's Future" Deadline: November 1, 2003


    Write a five-paragraph plus essay using this title as your main theme. We will be taping the best essays and submitting them to the VFW.

Oct-Nov.
    Macbeth by William Shakespeare. The play will be read both in and out of class.
    The WebQuest will be introduced and groups will be chosen based on Macbeth with Attitude's four parts.


Additional Assignments
Writing Journal:
Choose three writing journal topics from the online list and write at least half a page or more for each.
*************************

Week VII/VIII/IX

Research Paper

    Research paper topics (10-12 page minimum) will be assigned. Final choice made by early Nov.. This is a fully researched and cited paper with an extensive bibliography. Full details will be given in class.
    If you completed your summer reading, you may do it on your non-fiction choice. If you didn't, the topic must be a British/Irish/Scottish/Welsh author.
    Thesis, notecards, and outline to be completed in class by Dec. 1.
    Rough Draft and Final due prior to Christmas holiday.

Additional Assignments
Writing Journal:
Choose three writing journal topics from the online list and write at least half a page or more for each.
*************************

Macbeth with Attitude
See: http://www.kn.pacbell.com/wired/fil/pages/webmacbethms.html

WebQuest Dates to be arranged

    Group in-class research
    DVD of Macbeth.
    Complete Shakespeare Writing Journal entry.
    WebQuest Formal Presentation
    Individual five paragraph-minimum expository essay.


Week X/XI/XII/XIII
Essay 4
    Essay Topics: Choose one of the essay questions below. Using what you have learned from your research and any past experience with Shakespeare, create a well-thought out five-paragraph plus essay. This is due the day of the final presentations.

    1) At least since the 18th century, "Shakespeare" has been regarded as a mystery in one way or another(check out PBS's 1989 The Shakespeare Mystery or the link in the Macbeth with AttitudeWebQuest by the same name). Write an essay which explores some aspect of this mystery.
    2) Are Shakespeare's plays relevant to the 21st century? Why or why not?
    3) How does the life of an author enter into the construction of his literary work? Illustrate with specific examples from Shakespeare and/or others.



Writing Journal Extra
    I. Choose one of the following three quotes and add it to your Writing Journal, with an explanation of why it applies to you. Make sure this is complete before the final presentation. Consider that you and your teammates have learned an awesome amount of information by dividing up into different roles. Include in your explanation what you learned about yourself.
    1. You are too full o'th' milk of human kindness.
    2. You would screw your courage to the sticking place.
    3. You prefer your life to be tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow.
    The top essays will be submitted in early January 2003 in a Shakespeare essay competition.

    Group essay, powerpoint,or other multimedia presentation due.
    (see WebQuest for more information)


Essay Definitions

    Expository Essay:
    Expository essays advance ideas, but are not argumentative. They may contain narrative elements (ex: anecdote), but usually focus on explaining something to the reader. They put forth some idea or insight into the reading that needs to be better understood.

    Narrative Essay:
    Narrative essays are midway between the argumentative essay and the speculative essay. They can include stories, a single incident, and are almost always autobiographical. The idea is primary!

    Argumentative Essay:
    Argumentative essays make their claim directly and explicitly. Point blank: they persuade! They share a basic area of concern: to establish a point by providing evidence to support it. The support may include examples, analogies, facts, statistics, ancedote, and evidence. Both counterviews and counterarguments may be presented by using a pro/con structure or debate style.

    Speculative Essay:
    Speculative essays explore an idea, perception, or feeling. The tone of the essay is typically less authoritative and less insistent than that of an espository or argumentative essay. Usually the writer will use a less structured orgaization and will explore arguments, not advance them. This type of essay does not have a single, clear-cut thesis.
*************************

    Literary Circles

    Small group work:
    Each group will assign a member one or more of the following parts:
    1. Summarizer

    Definition: For each section read (approximately 25 pages or two chapters)you must summarize the plot, explain the theme, and describe the main characters.

    2. Quote Finder

    Definition:For each section read (approximately 25 pages or two chapters) you must find five important quotes that really explain the story.

    3. Photographer

    Definition:For each section read (approximately 25 pages or two chapters) you are to draw, design, and/or find three pictures that will help the members of your group understand the action.

    4. Vocabulary Expert

    Definition:As the expert in lexemes, you are to find at least ten new words in each section (approximately 25 pages or two chapters) that you were not familiar with previously or that you find "unique." Define them and explain how they were used in the text. Include page numbers in your notes.

    Parts should be rotated for each chapter of the novel or section read. All work should be completed on the computer if possible in order to make copies for each member of the group. One day each week will be used for Literary Circles through mid-Jan. Plan on completing two books by this time, so choose wisely. Once each book is complete, each group shall turn in one "clean-copy" of a fully completed manuscript. Include a cover sheet with the members of your group listed, along with the title and author of your book. Be creative!

Additional Assignments
Writing Journal:
Choose three writing journal topics from the online list and write at least half a page or more for each.
*************************

Week XVII/XVIII/XIX
Jan. 2004
    Geoffrey Chaucer (1340?-1400) (pg 55). Know these tales, their morals, and be able to describe the pilgrims who told them: "The Wife of Bath's Tale," "The Miller's Tale," "The Reeve's Tale," and The Pardoner's Tale."
    Hmwk: Search the Internet for information on Stonehenge and Canterbury Cathedral. Bring in the best site's information.
    Dead Poet's Society: Movie. Read (275-278) "To His Coy Mistress" by Andrew Marvell (1621-1678) Hmwk: Summarize the "Commentary." Then write a brief essay comparing carpe diem (seize the day) in Dead Poet's Society to Marvell's poem. Include personal comments as a conclusion comparing your own life to carpe diem.
    NOTE: Shakespeare essay for publication due asap.
    After watching Dead Poet's Society explain in your Writing Journal why you think Neal Perry felt emotionally that he had to take his own life.

Additional Assignments
Writing Journal:
Choose three writing journal topics from the online list and write at least half a page or more for each.
*************************

January 2004
    Finish Chaucer.
    Share Stonehenge information. Watch America's Stonehenge video. Find a different "Stonehenge" online and explain its meaning to the class.

Additional Assignments
Writing Journal:
Choose three writing journal topics from the online list and write at least half a page or more for each.
*************************

Read poems:

    "My Heart Leaps Up" by William Wordsworth (1770-1850) (p. 485)
    "To Autumn" by John Keats (1795-1821) (p. 583)
    "To a Mouse" by Robert Burns (1759-1796) (p. 440)
    "Pied Beauty" by Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889) (p. 659)
    "The Force that Through the Green Fuse Drives the Flower by Dylan Thomas (1914-1953) (p. 976)


In Class:

    "Kubla Khan" by Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834)(p. 513)
    Assignment: Draw a picture of Xanadu after reading the Commentary on page 514-515. Do: Descriptive Writing on page 515.
    "Composed Upon Westminster Bridge" William Wordsworth (1770-1850) (p. 486)


Week XX
    Give "Henge" reports orally.
    Pygmalion by Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) (p. 1004-1064)
    Read the Epilogue (p. 1064-1071)
    Movie: end of the week
    PowerPoint projects re research paper or personal memory presentation. See handout for more details.

January 2004
    Finish PPT projects and movie. Presentations on Wednesday.

Final

    Last class: return of finals. You're done! Breathe a sigh of relief! The end is in sight. Congratulations...You ALL are wonderful students and becoming tremendous people! I am very proud of your accomplishments. Please keep in touch. See you at graduation!

UNITS
(Approximately four weeks each)

Guiding Questions: What is love?
Love and Loss Unit
*What does it mean to love and be loved?
*How do we love ourselves?
*How does one deal with loss?
*How does growth proceed from loss?
*What types of loss can be expected in life?
    Generations
    *How does one generation see another?
    *How does the older generation affect those who come after?
    *What are the responsibilities of the younger generation to the older generation?

    Self Discovery

    *What are the different types of characterization, and how do authors use these elements to create life-like characters?
    *What causes characters to change and what are the results from moments of self-discovery?
    *How is literature symbolic of society and humanity?

    Shakespearean Tragedy

    *What are the basic elements of Shakespearean tragedies, and how do these elements contribute to the main themes of the dramatic works?
    *What are the aesthetic considerations, and how do they shape different interpretations of dramatic productions?
    *What motivates and drives characters and how can the knowledge be used to understand the human condition?

    Man vs. Society

    *What are specific student expectations for literature involving man versus society?
    *What are literary, historical, and contemporary examples of man versus society?
    *What are examples of common litrary elements/concepts of Dystopian Literature?


    SCHOOL-WIDE LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

    #2. Demonstrate the ability to be a reflective learner and an independent problem solver
    #3. Effectively communicate through writing and speaking

    ESSENTIAL SKILLS:
    1. Analyze different literary genres
    2. Write and speak effectively
    3. Become independent researchers
My Quia activities and quizzes
The Maze Runner Final
https://www.quia.com/quiz/6768178.html
Address Unknown Vocabulary
https://www.quia.com/jg/2852027.html
AP Literary Vocabulary
https://www.quia.com/jg/139092.html
Test Your Literary Terminology Skills
Shakespeare's Vocabulary re Macbeth
https://www.quia.com/jg/1795994.html
Macbeth Final (Eng IV)
https://www.quia.com/quiz/7209325.html
Literary Vocabulary for English
https://www.quia.com/jg/1447564.html
Review for English Final
https://www.quia.com/jg/2846907.html
The Maze Runner Vocabulary
https://www.quia.com/jg/2784863.html
The Maze Runner (1-8)
https://www.quia.com/quiz/6500583.html
The Maze Runner Chapters 1-10
https://www.quia.com/quiz/6122241.html
The Maze Runner Chapters 7-15
https://www.quia.com/quiz/6026760.html
The Maze Runner (Chapters 17-23)
https://www.quia.com/quiz/6036578.html
The Maze Runner Quiz (Chapters 21-30)
https://www.quia.com/quiz/6139535.html
The Maze Runner Chapters 31-33 Quick Quiz
https://www.quia.com/quiz/6538200.html
The Maze Runner Quiz Chapters 36-43
https://www.quia.com/quiz/6545854.html
The Maze Runner (Chapters 31-50)
https://www.quia.com/quiz/6141570.html
The Maze Runner Chapters 41-43
https://www.quia.com/quiz/6556035.html
The Maze Runner (Final with a focus on chapters 40-epilogue)
https://www.quia.com/quiz/6044678.html
The Shepherd and the Nymph Poems
https://www.quia.com/quiz/5545181.html
Useful links
Last updated  2020/03/24 11:36:25 EDTHits  25296