mrkpolicy
Mogadore High School Science Department Head
http://www.mogadore.summit.k12.oh.us/highschool/htm.
 
.............COURSE POLICIES.............

(These were handed out the first day of the class.)

..........Regular and Basic Physical Science..........

Grading

You will receive a weighted letter grade for all assignments, labs and tests.

Tests will count as 60% of your final grade.

Chapter homework must be handed in test day and can increase a test score up to an additional 5% (2/3 of a letter grade).

Labs will be worth 30%.

Misc. (video questions, quizzes, participation, student lead pre-lab discussion, etc.) will count as 10%.

You will have 3-4 tests each grading period.
One test grade will be dropped each grading period.
The first missed test not made up on time, according to school policy, will be your droped test. Every subseguent missed test not made up in time will be entered as an "F".

You will have 7 to 8 labs each grading period.
No lab grade will be dropped any grading period.

Your grades are available to be seen on the internet at the school's web site.

My chapter notes including OGT requirtements and overheads for each chapter will be handed out in booklet form for you to study from.

Lab Report Points will be determined by:
A. The importance and difficulty of the lab.
B. How much class time was needed to do the lab.
C. The time necessary to answer all questions.

......And......

D. Neatness: Use complete sentences when in doubt!  Lack of neatness will have a major negative impact on your grade. (A sample was enclosed.)

Classwork related extra credit is periodically offered.  When it is, it must be turned in when required just like any other assignment. No other extra credit is offered.  Do not get yourself into such a state that only "extra credit can pass you. Since there is none, only your prior effort will determine your grade !

If you are absent from class because you are: on a field trip, in a play, a cheerleader getting ready for a pep rally, or attending or participating in any other function; you must get your homework to me before class, that day it is due!
A copy of the school policy regarding this was enclosed in the packet.


Food

No food, candy, gum or beverages are allowed in the room or lab.  None is even to be seen!  Breaking this restriction will result with the item(s) being thrown away and up to three 7am detentions with me!   A science room with equipment and computers is no place for food or drink!


Test Makeup

Test makeups can be done before school, during lunch, after school, or during some other class period the second day back.   For example: if you missed a test on Wednesday and came back to school on Thursday, the test must be made up by the end of Friday.
One additional day will be allowed for each additional day absent.

Fees

Your fees must be paid as soon as possible.  Until they are, the school will not release your report card.  Breakage fees, if applicable, will be due before the next lab.


Behavior

I expect you to follow “The Golden Rule” and behave as though my mother were standing next to you!  Improper behavior, language, actions, etc., will not be tolerated!   I start with three 7am detentions and go up from there! Please do NOT mark my desks in any way! To do so will result in your parent having to come and see me, in addition to other penalties as needed.


Calling Home or Work

I will not hesitate to call your parents at home or work, right on the spot!
I have a phone right with me, which can be used immediately. 
When I ask you to do something, I expect you to do it the first time.


Labs

Lab reports are always due at the tardy bell 2 days after you finish the lab. For example, if you work on a lab Tuesday and Wednesday, it is due Friday.
....Late lab reports are only accepted one day late....
......Late lab reports lose 2 letter grades......
You may turn in a finished lab report early.
There is to be no horseplay in the lab.  The first time will result in a “0” for that lab. The second time will result in parental notification and a “0”.  The third time will result in the loss of ALL lab privileges and “0’s” for all subsequent labs unless your parents sign a liability form! 
Your parents will be made aware of this during the second offense contact.
When in the lab, a group leader will be responsible for his or her area and group, and as a result, this student can earn 2 bonus lab points.


Computers

You may not use the computers to check your grade; do that at the library or at home. The computers may be used once in a while in your class for labs. Do not mess with them physically nor try to hack them.  This will result in the loss of all computer privileges in this room unless your parents sign a liability waiver!


Studying

I do expect you to study 2 to 4 hours during the week!
I do expect you to read the text as assignedas part of this!

Not to do so will be reflected in your grade!  Chances of getting anything higher than a “D” will be slim.  Few people can “smart” their way through science classes.
If you do not know how to study, ask me!


Substitutes

Be on your best behavior if there is a substitute.  I will say no more!


Generalities

• Stay in your seat unless I say you can leave. 
• Do not get up to throw papers away, or for any other reason, during class discussions.  Wait until we are through, and then ask me.
• Do not talk to others about non- pertinent things while others or I am talking. This is rude and unacceptable.
• Do not touch my fans without my permission.
• You must be in your seat when the tardy bell rings. If you are not, you will be marked down in the attendance book as tardy.


Neatness and Information

All work handed in must be very neat and in pencil.  If ink is used, there must be no cross-outs, etc. If I have to try to figure out what you have written at all, I won’t, and you will receive no credit (since I cannot read it)!
Put your FULL NAME on all papers.  Assignments handed in without a name will be treated as a one day late hand-in!

Weekly Schedule

The weekly schedule is on a dry-erase board by the door.  Look at it each day, for it may change a few times a week.  “I didn’t know,” is not an acceptable answer for not having an assignment ready.


Sentences

Always use complete sentences when answering questions.
Not using complete sentences will often result in the loss of points. 
If in doubt, write a sentence.


Mathematics

Science uses a ton of mathematics.  You will use a little to quite a bit, depending on your class.  Pay attention in math class.  I do not plan on re-teaching you math you were already presented and supposed to learn.
I am familiar with your math curriculum.


Pencil or Pen !

All homework and labs should be done in pencil.  This allows all messy or incorrect work to be erased, which is also required. Also, do not us “b/c”, “cause”, or “cuz” for because, or any other such improper English usage.
If you do, you will lose a points.


Required For This Class :

1. Pencils
2. Colored Pencils/Markers
3. Calculator (per department/school policy).
4. Class Fees per schedule.


Conclusion

I will assume that whenever you answer a homework, lab or test question, whatever you write, is EVERYTHING you know about the subject.
You will be given much material to learn this year.
This is good practice for next year.
Don’t get behind!
I reserve the right to alter this policy under special circumstances.

WEB SITE PRACTICE

Go to the following web sites for games that will help you get ready for chapter tests and exams:

Period 4:  http://quia.com/pages/mrkper4.html
Period 6:  http://quia.com/pages/mrkper6.html
Period 8:  http://quia.com/pages/mrkper8.html


A Note to the Parent or Guardian

Please remember that all the grades are available on the internet to be seen at any time.  This way you can keep tabs on what is going on during the year and I won’t get calls asking how your son, daughter or guardian is doing in class (other than those you wish to discuss strategy about improving grades).   This prevents ‘surprises’ about late work, low scores, grades, etc.  As long as you do your job and view the grades every other day or so, these ‘emergency’ conferences will not be needed.  Please DO NOT let them ‘sink or swim’. Let the grade site be their
‘lifesaver’ and you the lifeguard.


Good Luck !

Mr. Lou Kristopson

School Phone 330-628-9943 x 5420
e-mail: mo_kristopl@neonet.k12.oh.us

Do not hesitate to call or e-mail me if you need to discuss something.

Dear Parent or Guardian :

Please acknowledge going over this “Course Policy”  packet,  which was given to your son, daughter, or guardian, by filling out and returning the last page.

Thank You
Lou Kristopson

...........................................................
...........................................................


...............Physical Science Acc...............

Grading

You will receive a weighted letter grade for all assignments, labs and tests.

Tests will count as 60% of your final grade.

Chapter homework must be handed in test day and can increase a test score up to an additional 5% (2/3 of a letter grade).

Labs will be worth 30%.

Misc. (video questions, quizzes, participation, student lead pre-lab discussion, etc.) will count as 10%.

You will have 3-4 tests each grading period.
One test grade will be dropped each grading period.
The first missed test not made up on time, according to school policy, will be your droped test. Every subseguent missed test not made up in time will be entered as an "F".

Remember, this is an accelerated class which means an “A” counts as 5 quality points.  Because of this, you need to remember that whatever it takes to get an “Excellent “ grade (“A”) in a regular science class will result in a “B” in this class. Therefore, a “Good” grade in this class would be a “C”, and an “A” in this class is considered to be a “Superior” grade.  What does this all mean?  It means that if your goal is to earn an “A”, that is a “Superior” grade, you will have to greatly exceed the requirements for what is considered an “Excellent” grade.  You will need to demonstrate that those students, who earn an “Excellent” grade, a “B”, are not even close to your abilities.
You will have 9 labs each grading period.

No lab grade will be dropped any grading period.

My chapter notes and overheads for each chapter will be handed out in booklet form for you to study from.

Your grades are available to be seen on the internet at the school's site.

Lab Report Points will be determined by:
A. The importance and difficulty of the lab.
B. How much class time was needed to do the lab.
C. The time necessary to answer all questions.

..............And..............

D. Neatness: Use complete sentences when in doubt!  Lack of neatness will have a major negative impact on your grade. The highest possible grade in such a case will be a "B".(A sample was enclosed.)

Classwork related extra credit is seldom, if ever, offered. If it is, it must be turned in when required just like any other assignment. No other extra credit is ever available for the Accelerated Physical Science class.

If you are absent from class because you are: on a field trip, in a play, a cheerleader getting ready for a pep rally, or attending or participating in any other function; you must get your homework to me before class, that day it is due!
A copy of the school policy regarding this was enclosed in the packet.


Food

No food, candy, gum or beverages are allowed in the room or lab.  None is even to be seen!  Breaking this restriction will result with the item(s) being thrown away and up to three 7am detentions with me!   A science room with equipment and computers is no place for food or drink!


Test Makeup

Test makeups can be done before school, during lunch, after school, or during some other class period the second day back.   For example: if you missed a test on Wednesday and came back to school on Thursday, the test must be made up by the end of Friday.
One additional day will be allowed for each additional day absent.


Fees

Your fees must be paid as soon as possible.  Until they are, the school will not release your report card.  Breakage fees, if applicable, will be due before the next lab.


Behavior

I expect you to follow “The Golden Rule” and behave as though my mother were standing next to you!  Improper behavior, language, actions, etc., will not be tolerated!   I start with three 7am detentions and go up from there! Do NOT mark my desks in any way! To do so will result in your parent having to come and see me, in addition to other penalties as needed.


Calling Home or Work

I will not hesitate to call your parents at home or work, right on the spot!  I have a phone right with me, which can be used immediately. 
When I ask you to do something, I expect you to do it the first time.


Labs

Lab reports are always due 2 days after the lab.  You are responsible for remembering this.

....Late lab reports are only accepted one day late....
......Late lab reports lose 3 letter grades......

You may turn in a finished lab report early. There is to be no horseplay in the lab.  The first time will result in a “0” for that lab. The second time will result in parental notification and a “0”.  The third time will result in the loss of ALL lab privileges and “0’s” for all subsequent labs unless your parents sign a liability form!  Your parents will be made aware of this during the second offense contact.
When in the lab, a group leader will be responsible for his or her area and group, and as a result, this student can earn 2 bonus lab points.
Always use complete sentences when answering questions.  I will assume that whatever you write is EVERYTHING you know about the subject.


Computers

The computers will be used once in a while in your class for labs. Do not mess with them physically nor try to hack them.  This will result in the loss of all computer privileges in this room unless your parents sign a liability waiver!


Studying

I do expect you to study SEVERAL HOURS per week!
I do expect you to read the text as assigned!

Not to do so will be reflected in your grade!  Chances of getting anything higher than a “D” will be slim.  Few people can “smart” their way through science classes.
If you do not know how to study, ask me!


Substitutes

Be on your best behavior if there is a substitute. I will say no more!


Generalities

• Stay in your seat unless I say you can leave. 
• Do not get up to throw papers away, or for any other reason, during class discussions.  Wait until we are through, and then ask me.
• Do not talk to others about non- pertinent things while others or I am talking. This is rude and unacceptable.
• Do not touch my fans without my permission.
• You must be in your seat when the tardy bell rings. If you are not, you will be marked down in the attendance book as tardy.


Neatness and Information

All work handed in must be very neat and in pencil.  If ink is used, there must be no cross-outs, etc. If I have to try to figure out what you have written at all, I won’t, and you will receive no credit (since I cannot read it)!
Put your FULL NAME on all papers.  Assignments handed in without a name will be treated as a one day late hand-in!
Labs which are not neat, orderly, and easy to read, cannot receive a grade higher than a "B".

Weekly Schedule

The weekly schedule is on a dry-erase board by the door.  Look at it each day, for it may change a few times a week.  “I didn’t know,” is not an acceptable answer for not having an assignment ready.


Sentences

Always use complete sentences when answering questions.
Not using complete sentences will often result in the loss of points. 
If in doubt, write a sentence.


Mathematics

Science uses a ton of mathematics.  You will use a little to quite a bit, depending on your class.  Pay attention in math class.  I do not plan on re-teaching you math you were already presented and supposed to learn.
I am familiar with your math curriculum.


Pencil or Pen !

All homework and labs should be done in pencil.  This allows all messy or incorrect work to be erased, which is also required. Also, do not us “b/c”, “cause”, or “cuz” for because, or any other such improper English usage.
If you do, you will lose a points.


Required For This Class :

1. Pencils
2. Colored Pencils/Markers
3. Calculator (per department/school policy).
4. Class Fees per schedule.


Conclusion

Whenever you answer any question, be it homework, lab or test; I will assume your answer is
everything
you know about the question, everything!
You will be given much material to learn this year.
This is good practice for next year.
Don’t get behind!
I reserve the right to alter this policy under special circumscances.


WEB SITE PRACTICE

Go to the following web sites for games that will help you get ready for chapter tests and semester exams:

.......http://quia.com/pages/mrkper3.html.....


A Note to the Parent or Guardian

Please remember that all the grades are available on the internet to be seen at any time.  This way you can keep tabs on what is going on during the year and I won’t get calls asking how your son, daughter or guardian is doing in class (other than those you wish to discuss strategy about improving grades).   This prevents ‘surprises’ about late work, low scores, grades, etc.  As long as you do your job and view the grades every other day or so, these ‘emergency’ conferences will not be needed.  Please DO NOT let them ‘sink or swim’.  Let the grade site be their ‘Lifesaver’ and you the Lifeguard.


Good Luck !

Mr. Lou Kristopson

School Phone 330-628-9943 x 5420
e-mail: mo_kristopl@neonet.k12.oh.us

Do not hesitate to call or e-mail me if you need to discuss something.


Dear Parent or Guardian :

Please acknowledge going over this “Course Policy”  packet, which was given to your son, daughter, or guardian, by filling out and returning the last page.

Thank You

Lou Kristopson

........................................................
........................................................

The following are the Ohio Board of Education, Grade Nine Academic Content Standards for Science, which I teach to all my classes (and must be learned in order to graduate by passing the OGT):

Grade Nine Science Benchmarks

By the end of the grade 9 program all students will be able to:

Earth and Space Sciences

A. Explain how evidence from stars and other celestial objects provide information about the processes that cause changes in the composition and scale of the physical universe.

B. Explain that many processes occur in patterns within the Earth's systems.

C. Explain the 4.5 billion-year-history of Earth and the 4 billion-year-history of life on Earth based on observable scientific evidence in the geologic record.

D. Describe the finite nature of Earth's resources and those human activities that can conserve or deplete Earth's resources.

E. Explain the processes that move and shape Earth's surface.

F. Summarize the historical development of scientific theories and ideas, and describe emerging issues in the study of Earth and space sciences.


Physical Sciences

A. Describe that matter is made of minute particles called atoms and atoms are comprised of even smaller components. Explain the structure and properties of atoms.

B. Explain how atoms react with each other to form other substances and how molecules react with each other or other atoms to form even different substances.

C. Describe the identifiable physical properties of substances (e.g., color, hardness, conductivity, density, concentration and ductility). Explain how changes in these properties can occur without changing the chemical nature of the substance.

D. Explain the movement of objects by applying Newton's three laws of motion.

E. Demonstrate that energy can be considered to be either kinetic (motion) or potential (stored).

F. Explain how energy may change form or be redistributed but the total quantity of energy is conserved.

G. Demonstrate that waves (e.g., sound, seismic, water and light) have energy and waves can transfer energy when they interact with matter.

H. Trace the historical development of scientific theories and ideas, and describe emerging issues in the study of physical sciences.

Science and Technology

A. Explain the ways in which the processes of technological design respond to the needs of society.

B. Explain that science and technology are interdependent; each drives the other.

Scientific Inquiry

A. Participate in and apply the processes of scientific investigation to create models and to design, conduct, evaluate and communicate the results of these investigations.

Scientific Ways of Knowing

A. Explain that scientific knowledge must be based on evidence, be predictive, logical, subject to modification and limited to the natural world.

B. Explain how scientific inquiry is guided by knowledge, observations, ideas and questions.

C. Describe the ethical practices and guidelines in which science operates.

D. Recognize that scientific literacy is part of being a knowledgeable citizen.


A C A D E M I C   C O N T E N T   S TA N D A R D S

Grade Nine

Earth and Space Sciences

The Universe

1. Describe that stars produce energy from nuclear reactions and that processes in stars have led to the formation of all elements beyond hydrogen and helium.

2. Describe the current scientific evidence that supports the theory of the explosive expansion of the universe, the Big Bang, over 10 billion years ago.

3. Explain that gravitational forces govern the characteristics and movement patterns of the planets, comets and asteroids in the solar system.

Earth Systems

4. Explain the relationships of the oceans to the lithosphere and atmosphere (e.g., transfer of energy, ocean currents and landforms).

Processes That Shape Earth

5. Explain how the slow movement of material within Earth results from:a. thermal energy transfer (conduction and convection) from the deep interior;b. the action of gravitational forces on regions of different density.

6. Explain the results of plate tectonic activity (e.g., magma generation, igneous intrusion, metamorphism, volcanic action, earthquakes, faulting and folding).

7. Explain sea-floor spreading and continental drift using scientific evidence (e.g., fossil distributions, magnetic reversals and radiometric dating).

  Historical Perspectives and Scientific Revolutions

8. Use historical examples to explain how new ideas are limited by the context in which they are conceived; are often initially rejected by the scientific establishment; sometimes spring from unexpected findings; and usually grow slowly through contributions from many different investigators (e.g., heliocentric theory and plate tectonics theory).


        Physical Sciences

Nature of Matter

1. Recognize that all atoms of the same element contain the same number of protons, and elements with the same number of protons may or may not have the same mass. Those with different masses (different numbers of neutrons) are called isotopes.

2. Illustrate that atoms with the same number of positively charged protons and negatively charged electrons are electrically neutral.

3. Describe radioactive substances as unstable nuclei that undergo random spontaneous nuclear decay emitting particles and/or high energy wavelike radiation.

4. Show that when elements are listed in order according to the number of protons (called the atomic number), the repeating patterns of physical and chemical properties identify families of elements. Recognize that the periodic table was formed as a result of the repeating pattern of electron configurations.

5. Describe how ions are formed when an atom or a group of atoms acquire an unbalanced charge by gaining or losing one or more electrons.

6. Explain that the electric force between the nucleus and the electrons hold an atom together. Relate that on a larger scale, electric forces hold solid and liquid materials together (e.g., salt crystals and water).

7. Show how atoms may be bonded together by losing, gaining or sharing electrons and that in a chemical reaction, the number, type of atoms and total mass must be the same before and after the reaction (e.g., writing correct chemical formulas and writing balanced chemical equations).

8. Demonstrate that the pH scale (0-14) is used to measure acidity and classify substances or solutions as acidic, basic, or neutral.

9. Investigate the properties of pure substances and mixtures (e.g., density, conductivity, hardness, properties of alloys, superconductors and semiconductors).

10. Compare the conductivity of different materials and explain the role of electrons in the ability to conduct electricity.

 
Nature of Energy

11. Explain how thermal energy exists in the random motion and vibrations of atoms and molecules. Recognize that the higher the temperature, the greater the average atomic or molecular motion, and during changes of state the temperature remains constant.

12. Explain how an object's kinetic energy depends on its mass and its speed (KE=½mv 2).

13. Demonstrate that near Earth's surface an object's gravitational potential energy depends upon its weight (mg where m is the object's mass and g is the acceleration due to gravity) and height (h) above a reference surface (PE=mgh).

14. Summarize how nuclear reactions convert a small amount of matter into a large amount of energy. (Fission involves the splitting of a large nucleus into smaller nuclei; fusion is the joining of two small nuclei into a larger nucleus at extremely high energies.)

15. Trace the transformations of energy within a system (e.g., chemical to electrical to mechanical) and recognize that energy is conserved. Show that these transformations involve the release of some thermal energy.

16. Illustrate that chemical reactions are either endothermic or exothermic (e.g., cold packs, hot packs and the burning of fossil fuels).

17. Demonstrate that thermal energy can be transferred by conduction, convection or radiation (e.g., through materials by the collision of particles, moving air masses or across empty space by forms of electromagnetic radiation).

18. Demonstrate that electromagnetic radiation is a form of energy. Recognize that light acts as a wave. Show that visible light is a part of the electromagnetic spectrum (e.g., radio waves, microwaves, infrared, visible light, ultraviolet, X-rays, and gamma rays).

19. Show how the properties of a wave depend on the properties of the medium through which it travels. Recognize that electromagnetic waves can be propagated without a medium.

20. Describe how waves can superimpose on one another when propagated in the same medium. Analyze conditions in which waves can bend around corners, reflect off surfaces, are absorbed by materials they enter, and change direction and speed when entering a different material.


Forces and Motion

21. Demonstrate that motion is a measurable quantity that depends on the observer's frame of reference and describe the object's motion in terms of position, velocity, acceleration and time.

22. Demonstrate that any object does not accelerate (remains at rest or maintains a constant speed and direction of motion) unless an unbalanced (net) force acts on it.

23. Explain the change in motion (acceleration) of an object. Demonstrate that the acceleration is proportional to the net force acting on the object and inversely proportional to the mass of the object. (F net =ma. Note that weight is the gravitational force on a mass.)

24. Demonstrate that whenever one object exerts a force on another, an equal amount of force is exerted back on the first object.

25. Demonstrate the ways in which frictional forces constrain the motion of objects (e.g., a car traveling around a curve, a block on an inclined plane, a person running, an airplane in flight).


Historical Perspectives and Scientific Revolutions

26. Use historical examples to explain how new ideas are limited by the context in which they are conceived; are often initially rejected by the scientific establishment; sometimes spring from unexpected findings; and usually grow slowly through contributions from many different investigators (e.g., atomic theory, quantum theory and Newtonian mechanics).

27. Describe advances and issues in physical science that have important, long-lasting effects on science and society (e.g., atomic theory, quantum theory, Newtonian mechanics, nuclear energy, nanotechnology, plastics, ceramics and communication technology).


Science and Technology

Understanding Technology

1. Describe means of comparing the benefits with the risks of technology and how science can inform public policy.

        Abilities To Do Technological Design

2. Identify a problem or need, propose designs and choose among alternative solutions for the problem.

3. Explain why a design should be continually assessed and the ideas of the design should be tested, adapted and refined.


Scientific Inquiry

Doing Scientific Inquiry

1. Distinguish between observations and inferences given a scientific situation.

2. Research and apply appropriate safety precautions when designing and conducting scientific investigations (e.g., OSHA, Material Safety Data Sheets [MSDS], eyewash, goggles and ventilation).

3. Construct, interpret and apply physical and conceptual models that represent or explain systems, objects, events or concepts.

4. Decide what degree of precision based on the data is adequate and round off the results of calculator operations to the proper number of significant figures to reasonably reflect those of the inputs.

5. Develop oral and written presentations using clear language, accurate data, appropriate graphs, tables, maps and available technology.

6. Draw logical conclusions based on scientific knowledge and evidence from investigations.


Scientific Ways of Knowing

Nature of Science

1. Comprehend that many scientific investigations require the contributions of women and men from different disciplines in and out of science. These people study different topics, use different techniques and have different standards of evidence but share a common purpose - to better understand a portion of our universe.

2. Illustrate that the methods and procedures used to obtain evidence must be clearly reported to enhance opportunities for further investigations.

3. Demonstrate that reliable scientific evidence improves the ability of scientists to offer accurate predictions.

Ethical Practices

4. Explain how support of ethical practices in science (e.g., individual observations and confirmations, accurate reporting, peer review and publication) are required to reduce bias.

Scientific Theories

5. Justify that scientific theories are explanations of large bodies of information and/or observations that withstand repeated testing.

6. Explain that inquiry fuels observation and experimentation that produce data that are the foundation of scientific disciplines. Theories are explanations of these data.

7. Recognize that scientific knowledge and explanations have changed over time, almost always building on earlier knowledge.

Science and Society

8. Illustrate that much can be learned about the internal workings of science and the nature of science from the study of scientists, their daily work and their efforts to advance scientific knowledge in their area of study.

9. Investigate how the knowledge, skills and interests learned in science classes apply to the careers students plan to pursue.


Useful links
Last updated  2008/09/28 04:48:50 EDTHits  377