summerreading9 Mrs. Briel
Totino-Grace  
http://totiongrace.org
 
SUMMER Reading/Journal: Read one or two books, or parts of several, from the list below. You are required to write three (3) journal entries. When school begins, you will also have a short, general-question essay exam on this reading, so other notes you take may be helpful for you personally. Keep them in the same notebook, but separate from your journal entries.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
When is the SUMMER READING JOURNAL due?
I’ll collect your journal on the first day of class (a half-day) - Monday, 27 August.

How much should I read?
You can decide: if you select something as dense or as long as, say, the books by Pressfield, Undset or Adams, one of those is fine; on the other hand, if you select a big-print McCaulay book, or a middle school-level book like Eric Kelly’s, you should read at least two books. If you begin a book, then find yourself uninterested after a few chapters, keep your notes, but try a different book.

How do I know what to choose?
I’ve made comments and suggestions after many of the texts. Locate several of them, then take time to look through the table of contents or the first few pages, before you make a decision. Also, show the list to parents or older siblings; you’d be surprised what they know, sometimes.

Where can I locate these books?
There are many possibilities:
• area libraries have many of them;
• some used bookstores in the metro area carry these books;
• in Stillwater, Loome’s Booksellers is particularly helpful, and there are other good used bookstores near Loome’s.
• try your family or friends’ bookshelves -- you might be surprised at what you find.
• you can order the books, at least those still in print, at Barnes and Noble stores or online, at BarnesandNoble.com or Amazon.com ( I really do advise you to look at the books before you buy them, however, so that you’re making an informed choice).v • you can contact me before 1 Aug, and I’ll try to guide you to books that might interest you: 586-6330, ex. 719 or - the best way to contact me - e-mail: briel001@tc.umn.edu. Also, I am hoping to have a note (possibly a Message Board, too) on the TG website, so check there:
totinograce.org--> Staff Directory--> M.E. Briel

Any advice?
Yes:
• Don’t wait until August to start
• Begin as soon as you read this page
• Start now

F.A.Q.’s - JOURNAL ENTRIES

Do WHAT…?
- Using three different "sentence openers" or “lead-in” suggestions from the list below, compose 3 journal entries; they should be on passages selected from the first-middle and last parts of your book. I f you read more than one book, or parts of more than one, please write at least one journal entry for each book.

A HEADING…?
- For each entry, write these: title of book; date of journal entry; page[s] the entry discusses. How LONG? - Each entry should be 150 - 300 words long. How?? Do all work in a spiral notebook or on computer. As you start to write, UNDERLINE the "lead-in" (then continue your journal entry). For WHEN?
The 3 entries of Summer Reading Journal are due the first day of class (a half-day) - Monday, 27 August.


“Lead-in” Suggestions for Journal Entries 1. I wonder what this passage/scene/character means (as you write, ponder various possibilities).
2. I like/dislike this idea because…
3. This character reminds me of ________________, because…
4. This scene (setting) is important because…
5. This scene/character/idea is similar to a scene/character/idea in -title of another book or a film>.
6. This part is unrealistic because…
7. This passage makes me think about__________ because…
8. This passage is particularly effective because…
9. The relationship between ___ and _____ is interesting because…
10. I like/dislike -name of character- because…
11. If I were <> at this point, I would…
12. I didn't understand this passage when I started reading, but now that I have finished/gotten farther in the book, I realize…

Novels, Short Stories, Drama Anderson, Maxwell BAREFOOT IN ATHENS
• Humorous at times, but contains a serious message about truth and truthfulness, as Socrates lived them; available in video, but beware: the film was made as a play, and to your special effects-accustomed eyes, it may appear contrived and artificial.
Coolidge, Olivia ROMAN PEOPLE

Costain, Thomas THE DARKNESS AND THE DAWN
• Easily available at local libraries, all of Costain’s historical novels are good reads. This one is about the Roman Empire, and Atilla the Hun (several of his others are British history)
Gardener, John GRENDEL
• Anyone interested in early British history might try this - it’s an adaptation of the epic Beowulf, a great adventure story with heroic and monstrous characters.
Goodrich, Norma MEDIEVAL MYTHS
• A retelling of the great medieval legends - Beowulf, Roland, Siegfried, The Cid, and others.
Kelly, Eric THE TRUMPETER OF KRAKOW
• This Newberry Award winner is a good junior high-level read, an adventure story set in Poland in the early Renaissance (15th c.). Mystery surrounds a precious jewel and a youthful patriot who stands in a church tower. Also available on tape at local libraries.
de Lafayette, Madame THE PRINCESS OF CLEVES.
• First published anonymously in 1678, sometimes called the first great short French novel ; set in the last days of Henri II of France (1519-59), it actually reflects the manners and morals of the court of Louis XIV: lots of gossip, deceit, and intrigue.
Lofts, Norah KNIGHTS OF ACRE
• Sir Godfrey Tallboys sets off on a six-year adventure, leaving Lady Sybilla to run the manor and raise the children; set in the 1450’s.
Paton Walsh, Jill A PARCEL OF PATTERNS.
• Mall Percival tells how the plague came to her Derbyshire village of Exam in the year 1665, and of how 3/4 of the people died before the end of the following year.
Prescott, H.F. THE MAN ON A DONKEY
SPANISH TUDOR: THE LIFE OF BLOODY MARY
Pressfield, Stephen TIDES OF WAR
• As of June '00, still only out in hardcover, so try your local library. This novel of Alcibiades and the Peloponnesian War is fast-paced and accurate.*
GATES OF FIRE
• Also an adventure story that rings with truth, this novel tells the story of the great Battle of Thermopylae.
* Sienkiewicz, Henryk QUO VADIS
Stewart, Mary THE CRYSTAL CAVE
THE HOLLOW HILLS
THE LAST ENCHANTMENT
THE WICKED DAY
• Mary Stewart’s series of Arthurian stories, following Merlin’s and then Modred’s adventures and education are not short, but are very readable.
Stone, Irving THE GREEK TREASURE
• Biographical novel of Henry and Sophie Schlieman; he discovered what are thought to be the ruins of ancient Troy.v THE AGONY AND THE ECSTASY
• Biographical novel of Michelangelo.
Tey, Josephine DAUGHTER OF TIME
• A modern detective tries to solve the mystery of King Richard III’s link to the deaths of the 2 young princes who were kept in the Tower of London. Also available on tape in local libraries.
Twain, Mark A YANKEE IN KING ARTHUR’S COURT
• Maybe you’ve seen the movie; maybe you’ve read some of this author’s other works. This one is a good read if you wonder how you’d feel, suddenly transported to the Middle Ages.
Undset, Sigrid KRISTIN LAVRANSDATTER
• Set in Norway in the Middle Ages, this is the story, from beginning to end, of Kristin, who struggles to understand her own will and God’s. This is a long one, but if you like to read, get through the first 100 pages and you’ll be caught. Liv Ullman recently directed a film of [Part I of] this epic - who knows, it may be coming soon to your neighborhood theater.
Wallace, Lewis BEN HUR: THE STORY OF CHRISTv • Tale of the Roman world at the time of Christ; first published in 1880, it has twice been made into a moviev White, T.H. THE ONCE AND FUTURE KING
THE BOOK OF MERLYN: Unpublished Conclusion to The Book of Merlyn

* These books by Pressfield come highly recommended by me and also by a classics scholar at the University of Minnesota, who will work with us when we read our Greek and Roman epics.
-MEB

Biography and Commentary

Adams, Henry MONT ST-MICHEL & CHARTRES
• Recommended for the daring reader, this classic commentary on two of France’s most important medieval sites/cathedrals contains much history and some philosophy and theology from the 13th c.
Bowra, C.M. THE GREEK EXPERIENCE
• This Oxford don’s writing is dense, but fluid; the chapter titles will indicate whether it’s worth a read; might be a good one for picking and choosing
Braymer, Marjorie THE WALLS OF WINDY TROY
• Biography of Heinrich Schlieman (Troy).
Chippindale, Christopher STONEHENGE COMPLETE
• Full account of the history of inquiry, from the Middle Ages to the present, into the megalithic structure in England.
Clark, Kenneth CIVILISATION
• Based on a BBC series of nearly 3 decades ago, Clark’s commentary and selected artwork trace the art, ideas and discoveries which form the basis of Western civilization; also available on videotape (PBS catalogue).
Erickson, Carolly. MISTRESS ANNE.
• Tells of the exceptional life of Anne Boleyn, who lost her head over Henry VIII.
Hamilton, Edith THE GREEK WAY
THE ROMAN WAY
• We’ll read parts of Hamilton’s Mythology in class; like that book, these two are clear and beautiful reading; selecting a few chapters might be a way to read either or both of these.
Hawkins, Gerald STONEHENGE DECODED
• Another one on Stonehenge (probably an easier read than the Chippindale, above).
Kitto, H.D.F. THE GREEKS
• First published in the 1950’s, this book remains a classic study of the character and history of Greek civilization and the people who created it. Arranged in chronological order, the text is challenging but it’s also lively, if you give it a chance.
MacCaulay, David CASTLE
CATHEDRAL
• You’ve probably seen the videos of these books, which are large, informative and easy on the eyes and mind.Remember, if you read these, you should combine them with at least one other work. Also available on CD-ROM and video.
Ronan, ColinSCIENCE: ITS HISTORY & DEVELOPMENT AMONG THE WORLD’S CULTURES
• Explores the scientific achievements since the beginning of history. The panoramic view is clear and easy, even for non-science buffs. Chapters on Greek, Roman, Medieval and Renaissance science are especially interesting for our purposes. The sections on non-Western sources - Chinese, Indian, Arabian - complement what we’ll study this year.
Rowse, A.L. EMINENT ELIZABETHANS
• Presents biographical sketches of five not very well known contemporaries of Shakespeare.
Last updated  2008/09/28 07:10:08 CDTHits  488