jojopilot Jacob
Jones Middle School Algebra period 9
http://www.expage.com/page/jonesmiddleschoolhouse8c
 
Math and nature go hand in hand.  They are like Adam and eve.  All math has come from nature and all nature has been explained using math.  One of the most directly related subjects is the Fibonacci numbers.  They are found all over nature.  They are found in everything from beehives to botanical flower designs.

The Fibonacci numbers can be represented with the equation N+T=H.  N= the second number of the previous Fibonacci equation, T= the sum of the previous Fibonacci equation, and H= the next Fibonacci number in the pattern.  Note the first equation starts with 1+1.  0 is skipped because it would make the equation pointless, 0+0.  The first numbers are , 1+1=2, 1+2=3, 2+3=5, 3+5=8 etc. 

The numbers are seen in nature in many ways.  Let's start exploring one of the most amazing areas.  The Fibonacci spiral.  This spiral is made when you take the square of every Fibonacci number and place them together in a certain pattern.  This is illustrated at http://www.mcs.surrey.ac.uk/Personal/R.Knott/Fibonacci/fibnat.html#spiral
This is not the only place a Fibonacci spiral is found, they are also found on pine cones and pineapples.  There are 8 spirals going one way and 13 going the other way on a pine cone.

There are Fibonacci numbers working in me as we speak.  look at your 2 hands.  They booth have 5 fingers, each of which has 3 parts separated by 2 knuckles.

Another amazing thing about this series of numbers is that when you take two of the numbers in succession and place them together, and find their ratio, with the larger number being divided by the smaller number we find that the higher the numbers we use the closer it gets to the golden number, approximately 1.61804.  This can be better represented by a graph at
http://www.mcs.surrey.ac.uk/Personal/R.Knott/Fibonacci/fibnat.html#golden


Fibonacci numbers don't end there.  Many or most plants have arrangements with Fibonacci numbers.  Daffodils, daisies, tulips, buttercups, lilies, delphiniums, and corn marigolds all have Fibonacci numbers in them.  It is an accepted theory that plants have Fibonacci numbers so that leaves do not shade leaves below from the sun, and so that more water can be channeled in towards the roots.

I have gotten most, if not all of my information from the great web sites of


http://www.mcs.surrey.ac.uk/Personal/R.Knott/

and

http://www.aegsp.br/hs/fib/fibnat.html
My Quia activities and quizzes
Fibonacci numbers
https://www.quia.com/jg/5746.html
Test what you have learned with these games
Useful links
Last updated  2008/09/28 11:39:32 PDTHits  647